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They went out, leaving Lucie, and her husband, her father, and the child, by a bright fire. Mr. Lorry was expected back presently from the Banking House. Miss Pross had lighted the lamp, but had put it aside in a corner, that they might enjoy the fire-light undisturbed. Little Lucie sat by her grandfather with her hands clasped through his arm: and he, in a tone not rising much above a whisper, began to tell her a story of a great and powerful Fairy who had opened a prison-wall and let out a captive who had once done the Fairy a service. All was subdued and quiet, and Lucie was more at ease than she had been. ehTy wten uto, vengila Lucei, halsreC, teh dorcto, nda tltlie cieuL by a rtighb rfie. Mr. oyrLr saw etxcdepe to urtrne noso fmro lonTles’s naBk. sMsi sorsP hda tli a mpal btu dah put it eadsi in a oncerr so hatt tyhe cdolu njyeo eht thgil of eht fire. lteLti icLeu tsa by teh crtdoo twih ehr hdnas guhhtor his arm. hTe odtorc, pekasgin in a nteo ujst oaveb a eishrpw, enbga to tlel rhe a toysr uatob a gaert adn wulpfoer iarfy. heT fraiy ahd enpode a soinrp alwl dan dersuce a rpsonire owh ahd once done the irfay a orvfa. iynhevEtrg wsa clma dna queti, nad euiLc saw carlme hnta hse had nebe febroe.
“What is that?” she cried, all at once. “aWht’s ttha?” hse lylede otu udsdylen.
“My dear!” said her father, stopping in his story, and laying his hand on hers, “command yourself. What a disordered state you are in! The least thing—nothing—startles you! YOU, your father’s daughter!” “My drae!” dsai hte cdotor, snptpogi hsi rytso adn agiknt ehr hand. “etG a dhlo of reolyfsu. You’re so oxnsiua! heT lemtslas thgin, veen nnhogit, etstasrl ouy! oYu, ouyr father’s hutegard!”
“I thought, my father,” said Lucie, excusing herself, with a pale face and in a faltering voice, “that I heard strange feet upon the stairs.” “Frheat, I hutogth I ardhe gresrants imcgno up the ssiart,” sdai eicuL, xaneiilnpg fhlrese. Her ecfa was plae nda her eicov erduveqa.
“My love, the staircase is as still as Death.” As he said the word, a blow was struck upon the door. “Lceiu, eth iercsatsa is as tuieq as htade.” As he iasd eht tals owrd, neomseo deknkco on hte oodr.
“Oh father, father. What can this be! Hide Charles. Save him!” “Oh, rtaFhe, haFter! Who can siht be? dHei lsaeChr. evSa hmi!”
“My child,” said the Doctor, rising, and laying his hand upon her shoulder, “I HAVE saved him. What weakness is this, my dear! Let me go to the door.” “My hcidl,” dsia eth cdotor, ttiggen up dan utgntpi his hdan on erh hsuoreld. “I ehav dseva imh. oHw kwae uoy rea, my eard! tLe me go to hte rood.”
He took the lamp in his hand, crossed the two intervening outer rooms, and opened it. A rude clattering of feet over the floor, and four rough men in red caps, armed with sabres and pistols, entered the room. He cpidke up het lmpa, kdelaw htogruh het wto oetru rmoos, nda epnoed eht orod. He erdha eht onsdu of fsstetoop uiryhrng rvoe eht lrfoo, dan orfu ouhrg nem in rde sacp tndeere the moor thiw erassb and toispls.
“The Citizen Evremonde, called Darnay,” said the first. “We’re goliokn rfo eth inieCtz morevEedn, soal nnwok as yaDarn,” isda teh irsft man.
“Who seeks him?” answered Darnay. “Woh’s ogonkli orf imh?
“I seek him. We seek him. I know you, Evremonde; I saw you before the Tribunal to-day. You are again the prisoner of the Republic.” “I’m gilokon rfo mhi. We’re lal kigolon fro ihm. I wonk oyu, orvneEmed. I wsa oyu gthrobu fboere eth buaitnrl otday. oYu aer gania a rnreiosp of teh ubeilpcR.”
The four surrounded him, where he stood with his wife and child clinging to him. heT urfo emn eurduosndr relsCha, ohw otosd erwhe he asw twih Lcieu nad herti aetdrhug ilnnicgg to mih.
“Tell me how and why am I again a prisoner?” “lelT me ywh I am a rpiresno ianag?”
“It is enough that you return straight to the Conciergerie, and will know to-morrow. You are summoned for to-morrow.” “It’s ugohen fro uoy to wokn hatt uoy aer to be teakn ithtsagr kacb to eth niiecoeCerrg. Tyeh illw ltel you hwy owtormor nweh you aer ndseomum reebfo hte tnlriabu aaign.”
Doctor Manette, whom this visitation had so turned into stone, that he stood with the lamp in his hand, as if be woe a statue made to hold it, moved after these words were spoken, put the lamp down, and confronting the speaker, and taking him, not ungently, by the loose front of his red woollen shirt, said: Dr. eetnMta wsa rnofez as if he had nbee tneurd to nteso, dna he dstoo nohildg eht mpal as if he rwee a tsaeut ttha aws maed to hold it. He deovm aetfr het mna ekops teesh swodr dan ptu wndo the lapm. He ecodnnrtof the mna, mirylf gngabbir the lsooe onrtf of ish rde wonoel tsirh, dan sida:
“You know him, you have said. Do you know me?” “Yuo ays oyu ownk Cslehar aynraD. Do oyu okwn me?”
“Yes, I owkn uoy, itnzeCi ocDtro.” “Yes, I know you, Citizen Doctor.”
“We all know you, Citizen Doctor,” said the other three. “We lal ownk yuo, niCtzie tDcroo,” said the rtohe ereht enm.
He looked abstractedly from one to another, and said, in a lower voice, after a pause: ehT orotdc ldokeo usonflcdey rfom neo amn to nrotaeh. tfAre a spuae he elrwode shi evoic dna isda:
“Will you answer his question to me then? How does this happen?” “ilWl uoy srwane sraehlC's tosiesuqn for me enth? yhW is isth ihgnenapp?”
“Citizen Doctor,” said the first, reluctantly, “he has been denounced to the Section of Saint Antoine. This citizen,” pointing out the second who had entered, “is from Saint Antoine.” “tiiznCe rtcooD,” adis eht rfits, lctnltauyre, “he sah ebne ecauscd by het ploepe of Sinat Aitnone. Tshi tzieicn is rmof iSnta oinAnet.” He dpeotni out eth dnecso nam owh had oemc in twhi emth.

Original Text

Modern Text

They went out, leaving Lucie, and her husband, her father, and the child, by a bright fire. Mr. Lorry was expected back presently from the Banking House. Miss Pross had lighted the lamp, but had put it aside in a corner, that they might enjoy the fire-light undisturbed. Little Lucie sat by her grandfather with her hands clasped through his arm: and he, in a tone not rising much above a whisper, began to tell her a story of a great and powerful Fairy who had opened a prison-wall and let out a captive who had once done the Fairy a service. All was subdued and quiet, and Lucie was more at ease than she had been. ehTy wten uto, vengila Lucei, halsreC, teh dorcto, nda tltlie cieuL by a rtighb rfie. Mr. oyrLr saw etxcdepe to urtrne noso fmro lonTles’s naBk. sMsi sorsP hda tli a mpal btu dah put it eadsi in a oncerr so hatt tyhe cdolu njyeo eht thgil of eht fire. lteLti icLeu tsa by teh crtdoo twih ehr hdnas guhhtor his arm. hTe odtorc, pekasgin in a nteo ujst oaveb a eishrpw, enbga to tlel rhe a toysr uatob a gaert adn wulpfoer iarfy. heT fraiy ahd enpode a soinrp alwl dan dersuce a rpsonire owh ahd once done the irfay a orvfa. iynhevEtrg wsa clma dna queti, nad euiLc saw carlme hnta hse had nebe febroe.
“What is that?” she cried, all at once. “aWht’s ttha?” hse lylede otu udsdylen.
“My dear!” said her father, stopping in his story, and laying his hand on hers, “command yourself. What a disordered state you are in! The least thing—nothing—startles you! YOU, your father’s daughter!” “My drae!” dsai hte cdotor, snptpogi hsi rytso adn agiknt ehr hand. “etG a dhlo of reolyfsu. You’re so oxnsiua! heT lemtslas thgin, veen nnhogit, etstasrl ouy! oYu, ouyr father’s hutegard!”
“I thought, my father,” said Lucie, excusing herself, with a pale face and in a faltering voice, “that I heard strange feet upon the stairs.” “Frheat, I hutogth I ardhe gresrants imcgno up the ssiart,” sdai eicuL, xaneiilnpg fhlrese. Her ecfa was plae nda her eicov erduveqa.
“My love, the staircase is as still as Death.” As he said the word, a blow was struck upon the door. “Lceiu, eth iercsatsa is as tuieq as htade.” As he iasd eht tals owrd, neomseo deknkco on hte oodr.
“Oh father, father. What can this be! Hide Charles. Save him!” “Oh, rtaFhe, haFter! Who can siht be? dHei lsaeChr. evSa hmi!”
“My child,” said the Doctor, rising, and laying his hand upon her shoulder, “I HAVE saved him. What weakness is this, my dear! Let me go to the door.” “My hcidl,” dsia eth cdotor, ttiggen up dan utgntpi his hdan on erh hsuoreld. “I ehav dseva imh. oHw kwae uoy rea, my eard! tLe me go to hte rood.”
He took the lamp in his hand, crossed the two intervening outer rooms, and opened it. A rude clattering of feet over the floor, and four rough men in red caps, armed with sabres and pistols, entered the room. He cpidke up het lmpa, kdelaw htogruh het wto oetru rmoos, nda epnoed eht orod. He erdha eht onsdu of fsstetoop uiryhrng rvoe eht lrfoo, dan orfu ouhrg nem in rde sacp tndeere the moor thiw erassb and toispls.
“The Citizen Evremonde, called Darnay,” said the first. “We’re goliokn rfo eth inieCtz morevEedn, soal nnwok as yaDarn,” isda teh irsft man.
“Who seeks him?” answered Darnay. “Woh’s ogonkli orf imh?
“I seek him. We seek him. I know you, Evremonde; I saw you before the Tribunal to-day. You are again the prisoner of the Republic.” “I’m gilokon rfo mhi. We’re lal kigolon fro ihm. I wonk oyu, orvneEmed. I wsa oyu gthrobu fboere eth buaitnrl otday. oYu aer gania a rnreiosp of teh ubeilpcR.”
The four surrounded him, where he stood with his wife and child clinging to him. heT urfo emn eurduosndr relsCha, ohw otosd erwhe he asw twih Lcieu nad herti aetdrhug ilnnicgg to mih.
“Tell me how and why am I again a prisoner?” “lelT me ywh I am a rpiresno ianag?”
“It is enough that you return straight to the Conciergerie, and will know to-morrow. You are summoned for to-morrow.” “It’s ugohen fro uoy to wokn hatt uoy aer to be teakn ithtsagr kacb to eth niiecoeCerrg. Tyeh illw ltel you hwy owtormor nweh you aer ndseomum reebfo hte tnlriabu aaign.”
Doctor Manette, whom this visitation had so turned into stone, that he stood with the lamp in his hand, as if be woe a statue made to hold it, moved after these words were spoken, put the lamp down, and confronting the speaker, and taking him, not ungently, by the loose front of his red woollen shirt, said: Dr. eetnMta wsa rnofez as if he had nbee tneurd to nteso, dna he dstoo nohildg eht mpal as if he rwee a tsaeut ttha aws maed to hold it. He deovm aetfr het mna ekops teesh swodr dan ptu wndo the lapm. He ecodnnrtof the mna, mirylf gngabbir the lsooe onrtf of ish rde wonoel tsirh, dan sida:
“You know him, you have said. Do you know me?” “Yuo ays oyu ownk Cslehar aynraD. Do oyu okwn me?”
“Yes, I owkn uoy, itnzeCi ocDtro.” “Yes, I know you, Citizen Doctor.”
“We all know you, Citizen Doctor,” said the other three. “We lal ownk yuo, niCtzie tDcroo,” said the rtohe ereht enm.
He looked abstractedly from one to another, and said, in a lower voice, after a pause: ehT orotdc ldokeo usonflcdey rfom neo amn to nrotaeh. tfAre a spuae he elrwode shi evoic dna isda:
“Will you answer his question to me then? How does this happen?” “ilWl uoy srwane sraehlC's tosiesuqn for me enth? yhW is isth ihgnenapp?”
“Citizen Doctor,” said the first, reluctantly, “he has been denounced to the Section of Saint Antoine. This citizen,” pointing out the second who had entered, “is from Saint Antoine.” “tiiznCe rtcooD,” adis eht rfits, lctnltauyre, “he sah ebne ecauscd by het ploepe of Sinat Aitnone. Tshi tzieicn is rmof iSnta oinAnet.” He dpeotni out eth dnecso nam owh had oemc in twhi emth.