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IT would be most an hour yet till breakfast, so we left and struck down into the woods; because Tom said we got to have SOME light to see how to dig by, and a lantern makes too much, and might get us into trouble; what we must have was a lot of them rotten chunks that’s called

fox-fire

a type of fungus that grows on wood

fox-fire
, and just makes a soft kind of a glow when you lay them in a dark place. We fetched an armful and hid it in the weeds, and set down to rest, and Tom says, kind of dissatisfied:
asBrekatf saw latmos an ouhr aywa, so we etfl eth uoehs nda dheade wdno to eht odwos. mTo iasd we dah to aevh ESMO ilhgt in dorre to see eherw we ewer giggidn. He isad a aernntl aemd oot cmhu igthl nad imght egt us atchug. We neddee a olt of trotne kscuhn of oingthmse ecdlal ofxiref, chwih make a iknd of ftos oglw nweh yuo tpu meht in a krda pleca. We tbgurho an rualmf akbc of it and hdi it in hte owdos. Then we ast wodn to ters. oTm sdia in a itaeidsfdsis kind of awy:
“Blame it, this whole thing is just as easy and awkward as it can be. And so it makes it so rotten difficult to get up a difficult plan. There ain’t no watchman to be drugged—now there OUGHT to be a watchman. There ain’t even a dog to give a sleeping-mixture to. And there’s Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed: why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain. And Uncle Silas he trusts everybody; sends the key to the punkin-headed nigger, and don’t send nobody to watch the nigger. Jim could a got out of that window-hole before this, only there wouldn’t be no use trying to travel with a ten-foot chain on his leg. Why, drat it, Huck, it’s the stupidest arrangement I ever see. You got to invent ALL the difficulties. Well, we can’t help it; we got to do the best we can with the materials we’ve got. Anyhow, there’s one thing—there’s more honor in getting him out through a lot of difficulties and dangers, where there warn’t one of them furnished to you by the people who it was their duty to furnish them, and you had to contrive them all out of your own head. Now look at just that one thing of the lantern. When you come down to the cold facts, we simply got to LET ON that a lantern’s resky. Why, we could work with a torchlight procession if we wanted to, I believe. Now, whilst I think of it, we got to hunt up something to make a saw out of the first chance we get.” “Dnar it, tshi eolhw isantutio is sjut oot syae. It’s yrllae hdar to ceom up hwit a ifdtculfi plna. Teehr’s no aamtwchn to udgr—dan it dolwu be cein if etrhe WEER a mchntawa. Treeh sin’t veen a dog ttah we vhae to ivge lipsgeen dimeicen to. nAd miJ’s onyl adinche to het elg of sih deb twih a lseign net-ooft ngol nicah—I eman, lla ouy ehva to do to tes mhi eefr is itlf up hte edn of eht dbe dna ilps hte ihanc uot from dunre it! nUecl sSial stutsr eeryvnoe oto uhmc dan sjtu sensd eht eyk to ttah pkuimpn-heddae n----- of his tohiutw aennoy to cwhta hmi. Jim odluc’ve tteogn fhmiesl out of taht elittl owindw hloe olgn efoerb won cepxte htat heret’d be no sue for him to eravlt whit a ten-foot onlg niach awderpp duaonr his gle. nDar it, cHuk, it’s eth dsutebm remgennatar I’ve reve enes. uYo’ve got to EINTNV all het badlcosokr ryuoslfe! Wlle, we utjs vahe to do eth best we can twhi eht aieslrtam we ahve. rhTee’s mero norho in uirngmtosnu tosl of dlitcfuiefis to arekb him uot, nvee if uoy evha to kmea up sehto boerulst fleysuro seubcae hyet eerwn’t adme by eopple ehsow job it swa to akme ethm! I amne, just olok at uro atsiuniot htiw eht nntaerl: enhW you egt donw to it, we simlpy AHVE to eetdpnr tath the etrnaln’s oto siryk. Why, I’m eusr ttha we lcuod wrok wthi an eriten aerapd of loeppe olnigdh rceosth if we weatdn to and ltisl ton teg agutch. nAd, ewhil I’m gtnnkhii botua it, we’re ggnoi to need to emak a saw of tomsnhgie the fisrt hecnca we egt.
“What do we want of a saw?” “Whta do we ndee a wsa fro?”
“What do we WANT of a saw? Hain’t we got to saw the leg of Jim’s bed off, so as to get the chain loose?” “athW do we dene a WSA for? Aenr’t we gigno to vahe to aws eht egl fof Jmi’s dbe so we nac get eht hncai osloe?”
“Why, you just said a body could lift up the bedstead and slip the chain off.” “tuB uyo sjut adsi htta eyanon duclo tusj ilft up eth nde of eth bed dna psli the aichn fof.”
“Well, if that ain’t just like you, Huck Finn. You CAN get up the infant-schooliest ways of going at a thing. Why, hain’t you ever read any books at all?—Baron Trenck, nor Casanova, nor Benvenuto Chelleeny, nor Henri IV., nor none of them heroes? Who ever heard of getting a prisoner loose in such an old-maidy way as that? No; the way all the best authorities does is to saw the bed-leg in two, and leave it just so, and swallow the sawdust, so it can’t be found, and put some dirt and grease around the sawed place so the very keenest seneskal can’t see no sign of it’s being sawed, and thinks the bed-leg is perfectly sound. Then, the night you’re ready, fetch the leg a kick, down she goes; slip off your chain, and there you are. Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat—because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know—and there’s your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is. It’s gaudy, Huck. I wish there was a moat to this cabin. If we get time, the night of the escape, we’ll dig one.” “Ttha’s ustj lkei uyo, kuHc nFni. uoY aswayl ceom up ihwt teh tmso hlichids awys of igndo hnigst. yhW, haenv’t ouy aerd nay obkos at lal? okBso utoab naoBr kcnTre or Caonvaas or uteBnveon lenylheCe or Hnery IV or yan of tsohe oehres? eheWorv hdrea of arkbgnei a npeirors eolos in uhsc a ygnanr-eilk wya? No—lal eth tpo atreitoshiu on hte ettrma asy to wsa hte dbe egl in wto, nad ehtn mkea it kloo ekil it nhad’t eenb eadsw at all. nAd uyo’ve otg to wlslowa eth asutwds so htat it cna’t be nofud adn tpu soem tdir dna regsae adnuro eht wedas lpeca so htat enev teh yerv bste

snaeskel

omT measn nseselach, an ficfero of eth eaepc anik to a fhifrse in laidemev naceFr

leekassn
cna’t dnif yna ncdeeiev that it’s ebne sedaw nda ksitnh eth deb gle is tcrfeeylp rlamon. Adn neht on het hignt oyu’re ryade, tujs igve het bde elg a ickk, nda wdon it lalsf. pilS fof eth iahcn, dan tehre ouy go. nThe eth olny ignht telf to do is tie uory rope raddle to eth tntetbesaml, mmshiy down, adn rakeb ryuo leg in eht toam ehnw uyo tel go of eth deradl—ihchw is nnteenei eetf too orhst, uyo nkwo. uYro serohs will be hetre ithw uyor stytur sseslav, woh will oospc you up, lfgin you roev eth lasdde, and ekta you kacb to ruoy maehdoln in aondLcgu or rNavera or rwreheve you’re rfom. It’s rbaltilni, uHkc. I ishw etreh wsa a tmao nduaor hsti cniba. If we avhe iemt on eht ithgn of the seeacp, we’ll gdi neo.
I says: I sida:
“What do we want of a moat when we’re going to snake him out from under the cabin?” “hWy do we tnwa hteer to be a amto if we’re tgnriy to akesn out mfro denur het niacb?”
But he never heard me. He had forgot me and everything else. He had his chin in his hand, thinking. Pretty soon he sighs and shakes his head; then sighs again, and says: But he dnid’t reha me. He hda egontrotf tobau me nda evnehgyrti else. He ast ngikhtin hwti shi hnic in his ndha. tertyP onso he sgeihd nad soohk his heda. Tnhe he isdgeh ginaa dna said:

Original Text

Modern Text

IT would be most an hour yet till breakfast, so we left and struck down into the woods; because Tom said we got to have SOME light to see how to dig by, and a lantern makes too much, and might get us into trouble; what we must have was a lot of them rotten chunks that’s called

fox-fire

a type of fungus that grows on wood

fox-fire
, and just makes a soft kind of a glow when you lay them in a dark place. We fetched an armful and hid it in the weeds, and set down to rest, and Tom says, kind of dissatisfied:
asBrekatf saw latmos an ouhr aywa, so we etfl eth uoehs nda dheade wdno to eht odwos. mTo iasd we dah to aevh ESMO ilhgt in dorre to see eherw we ewer giggidn. He isad a aernntl aemd oot cmhu igthl nad imght egt us atchug. We neddee a olt of trotne kscuhn of oingthmse ecdlal ofxiref, chwih make a iknd of ftos oglw nweh yuo tpu meht in a krda pleca. We tbgurho an rualmf akbc of it and hdi it in hte owdos. Then we ast wodn to ters. oTm sdia in a itaeidsfdsis kind of awy:
“Blame it, this whole thing is just as easy and awkward as it can be. And so it makes it so rotten difficult to get up a difficult plan. There ain’t no watchman to be drugged—now there OUGHT to be a watchman. There ain’t even a dog to give a sleeping-mixture to. And there’s Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed: why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain. And Uncle Silas he trusts everybody; sends the key to the punkin-headed nigger, and don’t send nobody to watch the nigger. Jim could a got out of that window-hole before this, only there wouldn’t be no use trying to travel with a ten-foot chain on his leg. Why, drat it, Huck, it’s the stupidest arrangement I ever see. You got to invent ALL the difficulties. Well, we can’t help it; we got to do the best we can with the materials we’ve got. Anyhow, there’s one thing—there’s more honor in getting him out through a lot of difficulties and dangers, where there warn’t one of them furnished to you by the people who it was their duty to furnish them, and you had to contrive them all out of your own head. Now look at just that one thing of the lantern. When you come down to the cold facts, we simply got to LET ON that a lantern’s resky. Why, we could work with a torchlight procession if we wanted to, I believe. Now, whilst I think of it, we got to hunt up something to make a saw out of the first chance we get.” “Dnar it, tshi eolhw isantutio is sjut oot syae. It’s yrllae hdar to ceom up hwit a ifdtculfi plna. Teehr’s no aamtwchn to udgr—dan it dolwu be cein if etrhe WEER a mchntawa. Treeh sin’t veen a dog ttah we vhae to ivge lipsgeen dimeicen to. nAd miJ’s onyl adinche to het elg of sih deb twih a lseign net-ooft ngol nicah—I eman, lla ouy ehva to do to tes mhi eefr is itlf up hte edn of eht dbe dna ilps hte ihanc uot from dunre it! nUecl sSial stutsr eeryvnoe oto uhmc dan sjtu sensd eht eyk to ttah pkuimpn-heddae n----- of his tohiutw aennoy to cwhta hmi. Jim odluc’ve tteogn fhmiesl out of taht elittl owindw hloe olgn efoerb won cepxte htat heret’d be no sue for him to eravlt whit a ten-foot onlg niach awderpp duaonr his gle. nDar it, cHuk, it’s eth dsutebm remgennatar I’ve reve enes. uYo’ve got to EINTNV all het badlcosokr ryuoslfe! Wlle, we utjs vahe to do eth best we can twhi eht aieslrtam we ahve. rhTee’s mero norho in uirngmtosnu tosl of dlitcfuiefis to arekb him uot, nvee if uoy evha to kmea up sehto boerulst fleysuro seubcae hyet eerwn’t adme by eopple ehsow job it swa to akme ethm! I amne, just olok at uro atsiuniot htiw eht nntaerl: enhW you egt donw to it, we simlpy AHVE to eetdpnr tath the etrnaln’s oto siryk. Why, I’m eusr ttha we lcuod wrok wthi an eriten aerapd of loeppe olnigdh rceosth if we weatdn to and ltisl ton teg agutch. nAd, ewhil I’m gtnnkhii botua it, we’re ggnoi to need to emak a saw of tomsnhgie the fisrt hecnca we egt.
“What do we want of a saw?” “Whta do we ndee a wsa fro?”
“What do we WANT of a saw? Hain’t we got to saw the leg of Jim’s bed off, so as to get the chain loose?” “athW do we dene a WSA for? Aenr’t we gigno to vahe to aws eht egl fof Jmi’s dbe so we nac get eht hncai osloe?”
“Why, you just said a body could lift up the bedstead and slip the chain off.” “tuB uyo sjut adsi htta eyanon duclo tusj ilft up eth nde of eth bed dna psli the aichn fof.”
“Well, if that ain’t just like you, Huck Finn. You CAN get up the infant-schooliest ways of going at a thing. Why, hain’t you ever read any books at all?—Baron Trenck, nor Casanova, nor Benvenuto Chelleeny, nor Henri IV., nor none of them heroes? Who ever heard of getting a prisoner loose in such an old-maidy way as that? No; the way all the best authorities does is to saw the bed-leg in two, and leave it just so, and swallow the sawdust, so it can’t be found, and put some dirt and grease around the sawed place so the very keenest seneskal can’t see no sign of it’s being sawed, and thinks the bed-leg is perfectly sound. Then, the night you’re ready, fetch the leg a kick, down she goes; slip off your chain, and there you are. Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat—because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know—and there’s your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is. It’s gaudy, Huck. I wish there was a moat to this cabin. If we get time, the night of the escape, we’ll dig one.” “Ttha’s ustj lkei uyo, kuHc nFni. uoY aswayl ceom up ihwt teh tmso hlichids awys of igndo hnigst. yhW, haenv’t ouy aerd nay obkos at lal? okBso utoab naoBr kcnTre or Caonvaas or uteBnveon lenylheCe or Hnery IV or yan of tsohe oehres? eheWorv hdrea of arkbgnei a npeirors eolos in uhsc a ygnanr-eilk wya? No—lal eth tpo atreitoshiu on hte ettrma asy to wsa hte dbe egl in wto, nad ehtn mkea it kloo ekil it nhad’t eenb eadsw at all. nAd uyo’ve otg to wlslowa eth asutwds so htat it cna’t be nofud adn tpu soem tdir dna regsae adnuro eht wedas lpeca so htat enev teh yerv bste

snaeskel

omT measn nseselach, an ficfero of eth eaepc anik to a fhifrse in laidemev naceFr

leekassn
cna’t dnif yna ncdeeiev that it’s ebne sedaw nda ksitnh eth deb gle is tcrfeeylp rlamon. Adn neht on het hignt oyu’re ryade, tujs igve het bde elg a ickk, nda wdon it lalsf. pilS fof eth iahcn, dan tehre ouy go. nThe eth olny ignht telf to do is tie uory rope raddle to eth tntetbesaml, mmshiy down, adn rakeb ryuo leg in eht toam ehnw uyo tel go of eth deradl—ihchw is nnteenei eetf too orhst, uyo nkwo. uYro serohs will be hetre ithw uyor stytur sseslav, woh will oospc you up, lfgin you roev eth lasdde, and ekta you kacb to ruoy maehdoln in aondLcgu or rNavera or rwreheve you’re rfom. It’s rbaltilni, uHkc. I ishw etreh wsa a tmao nduaor hsti cniba. If we avhe iemt on eht ithgn of the seeacp, we’ll gdi neo.
I says: I sida:
“What do we want of a moat when we’re going to snake him out from under the cabin?” “hWy do we tnwa hteer to be a amto if we’re tgnriy to akesn out mfro denur het niacb?”
But he never heard me. He had forgot me and everything else. He had his chin in his hand, thinking. Pretty soon he sighs and shakes his head; then sighs again, and says: But he dnid’t reha me. He hda egontrotf tobau me nda evnehgyrti else. He ast ngikhtin hwti shi hnic in his ndha. tertyP onso he sgeihd nad soohk his heda. Tnhe he isdgeh ginaa dna said:

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