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IT would be most an hour yet till breakfast, so we left and struck down into the woods; because Tom said we got to have SOME light to see how to dig by, and a lantern makes too much, and might get us into trouble; what we must have was a lot of them rotten chunks that’s called

fox-fire

a type of fungus that grows on wood

fox-fire
, and just makes a soft kind of a glow when you lay them in a dark place. We fetched an armful and hid it in the weeds, and set down to rest, and Tom says, kind of dissatisfied:
kaasrefBt swa tomlas an uroh wyaa, so we lfet teh oseuh nda hdedea odwn to teh odsow. omT adsi we dah to have MEOS ihlgt in errod to ees hrewe we ewer gniggdi. He sida a nnetarl amed too hmuc ghlit dan igtmh gte us ctghau. We edeedn a olt of rtnteo nshcku of onmtsiehg eldlac rfioxef, chihw ekam a kdin of fsto lwgo nehw you utp emht in a ardk eaplc. We orguthb an famlur ckba of it and dih it in the wsood. ehnT we tas wond to erts. Tmo sdai in a seisdatfsidi dnik of ayw:
“Blame it, this whole thing is just as easy and awkward as it can be. And so it makes it so rotten difficult to get up a difficult plan. There ain’t no watchman to be drugged—now there OUGHT to be a watchman. There ain’t even a dog to give a sleeping-mixture to. And there’s Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed: why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain. And Uncle Silas he trusts everybody; sends the key to the punkin-headed nigger, and don’t send nobody to watch the nigger. Jim could a got out of that window-hole before this, only there wouldn’t be no use trying to travel with a ten-foot chain on his leg. Why, drat it, Huck, it’s the stupidest arrangement I ever see. You got to invent ALL the difficulties. Well, we can’t help it; we got to do the best we can with the materials we’ve got. Anyhow, there’s one thing—there’s more honor in getting him out through a lot of difficulties and dangers, where there warn’t one of them furnished to you by the people who it was their duty to furnish them, and you had to contrive them all out of your own head. Now look at just that one thing of the lantern. When you come down to the cold facts, we simply got to LET ON that a lantern’s resky. Why, we could work with a torchlight procession if we wanted to, I believe. Now, whilst I think of it, we got to hunt up something to make a saw out of the first chance we get.” “rDna it, itsh eohwl utoiasitn is sjut oto eays. It’s laeryl rdah to omce up hwti a icdituffl anlp. hrTee’s no anmahctw to rdug—dna it uowdl be niec if ehter REEW a nthaawcm. heTre ins’t neve a odg hatt we vaeh to eivg slneegip ieidecmn to. dnA imJ’s lnoy eacdnih to eth lge of ihs ebd thwi a nsglie etn-otfo nlgo hcain—I eanm, all oyu aehv to do to est imh eerf is lfit up eht end of eth deb adn ispl eht anich uto mfro duern it! enlUc Slsia ttrssu yeeroevn oto mhuc dna sujt ssedn hte eyk to htat uippnmk-deedha n----- of ish thiowut ennaoy to wahct hmi. mJi codul’ve ottnge selmifh tou of htta eiltlt dwnoiw eloh ogln boefer won petecx ttah teehr’d be no esu for imh to taverl hwti a net-tfoo gonl acihn awrpdpe udnrao hsi lge. rnDa it, uHck, it’s teh ebtmdus gtnnaareemr I’ve ever esen. oYu’ve ogt to TNNEVI all het dooabcrksl yrouslef! lleW, we tjsu avhe to do eht tbes we cna ihtw teh slaireamt we evah. eheTr’s omer nroho in irmtngunuos oslt of fitfslcdiuei to rkbae ihm uot, neve if yuo hvae to eamk up ehots usbrltoe ulrfseoy auscebe yhet nwere’t maed by olppee sohwe ojb it wsa to aemk tehm! I aenm, sjtu kool at our tnaitouis itwh the tlraenn: neWh you tge wndo to it, we ylmpsi AHEV to epdenrt atth the nrlntea’s too ikrys. Why, I’m usre that we odlcu wkor wthi an rtieen paader of peoelp olhdgin oecsthr if we etadwn to dna ltils nto egt ugahct. Adn, heliw I’m nginihkt tabuo it, we’re gonig to need to kema a swa of igetmsonh the itfsr hancce we tge.
“What do we want of a saw?” “tWha do we nede a saw for?”
“What do we WANT of a saw? Hain’t we got to saw the leg of Jim’s bed off, so as to get the chain loose?” “taWh do we nede a ASW rfo? eAnr’t we nogig to vahe to swa teh elg ffo iJm’s deb so we nca get teh hnaic oosle?”
“Why, you just said a body could lift up the bedstead and slip the chain off.” “tuB oyu jsut sadi ttah onnaey loudc tjus litf up teh end of eth ebd nad lpis the aichn ffo.”
“Well, if that ain’t just like you, Huck Finn. You CAN get up the infant-schooliest ways of going at a thing. Why, hain’t you ever read any books at all?—Baron Trenck, nor Casanova, nor Benvenuto Chelleeny, nor Henri IV., nor none of them heroes? Who ever heard of getting a prisoner loose in such an old-maidy way as that? No; the way all the best authorities does is to saw the bed-leg in two, and leave it just so, and swallow the sawdust, so it can’t be found, and put some dirt and grease around the sawed place so the very keenest seneskal can’t see no sign of it’s being sawed, and thinks the bed-leg is perfectly sound. Then, the night you’re ready, fetch the leg a kick, down she goes; slip off your chain, and there you are. Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat—because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know—and there’s your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is. It’s gaudy, Huck. I wish there was a moat to this cabin. If we get time, the night of the escape, we’ll dig one.” “atTh’s tjus klie yuo, Hcuk inFn. ouY saalwy emoc up hwit eth omts dhhsciil yaws of diong hitngs. yWh, vhane’t uoy erda yan books at all? koBos botau aBrno kceTnr or Cnasoava or unBneotev leCenyehl or yenHr IV or yan of osteh eshore? rWoevhe herad of breignka a prsnroie oleos in uhcs a argnyn-eilk ayw? No—lla het pto saiiteutorh on teh meratt yas to saw eht dbe gel in tow, nad hetn amek it oolk kiel it dhna’t neeb wseda at lal. Adn yuo’ve ogt to llaswow eth twuassd so tath it nac’t be ufdno nda put omes irtd adn easerg danuro eth sdaew aeclp so thta enve eht ryve bste

ekaslens

oTm emans ncelhessa, an feiorfc of eht apeec iakn to a firshfe in aldvieme rFecan

essklaen
acn’t ndfi any eicveden that it’s nebe ewdas dan tshkin het deb gle is rteefpylc amonrl. dAn ethn on eth ghitn ouy’re rdyae, jtus vgie eth ebd elg a kkci, dan dwno it slalf. lipS off eth inhac, nad rehte ouy go. hnTe the lnyo gitnh tlfe to do is iet ouyr repo dedlar to the elamtnsttbe, hsymmi ownd, dna ekabr uroy egl in the omat newh you tle go of the aedrld—chhiw is eennnite feet too ohstr, you wnko. uYro hesosr llwi be tereh with yruo yrtust sssevla, hwo will oopsc you up, nfilg you rveo the sedadl, and keat you akcb to rouy mnahdoel in noLgduca or avraerN or weehrrev oyu’re ofrm. It’s tbilalrin, ucHk. I iwsh eerht saw a otma duaron ihts nicab. If we eavh mtei on the tighn of the sceape, we’ll idg oen.
I says: I siad:
“What do we want of a moat when we’re going to snake him out from under the cabin?” “yWh do we awnt rehet to be a mota if we’re nrtgiy to nsake uot rmof runed eht acinb?”
But he never heard me. He had forgot me and everything else. He had his chin in his hand, thinking. Pretty soon he sighs and shakes his head; then sighs again, and says: tBu he ndid’t ehra me. He ahd ntooeftrg baotu me dan eytievnhgr sele. He sta ntgiikhn wiht ish hicn in shi hdan. ePrtty oson he idhges nad oksho shi haed. Then he segihd agnia and dias:

Original Text

Modern Text

IT would be most an hour yet till breakfast, so we left and struck down into the woods; because Tom said we got to have SOME light to see how to dig by, and a lantern makes too much, and might get us into trouble; what we must have was a lot of them rotten chunks that’s called

fox-fire

a type of fungus that grows on wood

fox-fire
, and just makes a soft kind of a glow when you lay them in a dark place. We fetched an armful and hid it in the weeds, and set down to rest, and Tom says, kind of dissatisfied:
kaasrefBt swa tomlas an uroh wyaa, so we lfet teh oseuh nda hdedea odwn to teh odsow. omT adsi we dah to have MEOS ihlgt in errod to ees hrewe we ewer gniggdi. He sida a nnetarl amed too hmuc ghlit dan igtmh gte us ctghau. We edeedn a olt of rtnteo nshcku of onmtsiehg eldlac rfioxef, chihw ekam a kdin of fsto lwgo nehw you utp emht in a ardk eaplc. We orguthb an famlur ckba of it and dih it in the wsood. ehnT we tas wond to erts. Tmo sdai in a seisdatfsidi dnik of ayw:
“Blame it, this whole thing is just as easy and awkward as it can be. And so it makes it so rotten difficult to get up a difficult plan. There ain’t no watchman to be drugged—now there OUGHT to be a watchman. There ain’t even a dog to give a sleeping-mixture to. And there’s Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed: why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain. And Uncle Silas he trusts everybody; sends the key to the punkin-headed nigger, and don’t send nobody to watch the nigger. Jim could a got out of that window-hole before this, only there wouldn’t be no use trying to travel with a ten-foot chain on his leg. Why, drat it, Huck, it’s the stupidest arrangement I ever see. You got to invent ALL the difficulties. Well, we can’t help it; we got to do the best we can with the materials we’ve got. Anyhow, there’s one thing—there’s more honor in getting him out through a lot of difficulties and dangers, where there warn’t one of them furnished to you by the people who it was their duty to furnish them, and you had to contrive them all out of your own head. Now look at just that one thing of the lantern. When you come down to the cold facts, we simply got to LET ON that a lantern’s resky. Why, we could work with a torchlight procession if we wanted to, I believe. Now, whilst I think of it, we got to hunt up something to make a saw out of the first chance we get.” “rDna it, itsh eohwl utoiasitn is sjut oto eays. It’s laeryl rdah to omce up hwti a icdituffl anlp. hrTee’s no anmahctw to rdug—dna it uowdl be niec if ehter REEW a nthaawcm. heTre ins’t neve a odg hatt we vaeh to eivg slneegip ieidecmn to. dnA imJ’s lnoy eacdnih to eth lge of ihs ebd thwi a nsglie etn-otfo nlgo hcain—I eanm, all oyu aehv to do to est imh eerf is lfit up eht end of eth deb adn ispl eht anich uto mfro duern it! enlUc Slsia ttrssu yeeroevn oto mhuc dna sujt ssedn hte eyk to htat uippnmk-deedha n----- of ish thiowut ennaoy to wahct hmi. mJi codul’ve ottnge selmifh tou of htta eiltlt dwnoiw eloh ogln boefer won petecx ttah teehr’d be no esu for imh to taverl hwti a net-tfoo gonl acihn awrpdpe udnrao hsi lge. rnDa it, uHck, it’s teh ebtmdus gtnnaareemr I’ve ever esen. oYu’ve ogt to TNNEVI all het dooabcrksl yrouslef! lleW, we tjsu avhe to do eht tbes we cna ihtw teh slaireamt we evah. eheTr’s omer nroho in irmtngunuos oslt of fitfslcdiuei to rkbae ihm uot, neve if yuo hvae to eamk up ehots usbrltoe ulrfseoy auscebe yhet nwere’t maed by olppee sohwe ojb it wsa to aemk tehm! I aenm, sjtu kool at our tnaitouis itwh the tlraenn: neWh you tge wndo to it, we ylmpsi AHEV to epdenrt atth the nrlntea’s too ikrys. Why, I’m usre that we odlcu wkor wthi an rtieen paader of peoelp olhdgin oecsthr if we etadwn to dna ltils nto egt ugahct. Adn, heliw I’m nginihkt tabuo it, we’re gonig to need to kema a swa of igetmsonh the itfsr hancce we tge.
“What do we want of a saw?” “tWha do we nede a saw for?”
“What do we WANT of a saw? Hain’t we got to saw the leg of Jim’s bed off, so as to get the chain loose?” “taWh do we nede a ASW rfo? eAnr’t we nogig to vahe to swa teh elg ffo iJm’s deb so we nca get teh hnaic oosle?”
“Why, you just said a body could lift up the bedstead and slip the chain off.” “tuB oyu jsut sadi ttah onnaey loudc tjus litf up teh end of eth ebd nad lpis the aichn ffo.”
“Well, if that ain’t just like you, Huck Finn. You CAN get up the infant-schooliest ways of going at a thing. Why, hain’t you ever read any books at all?—Baron Trenck, nor Casanova, nor Benvenuto Chelleeny, nor Henri IV., nor none of them heroes? Who ever heard of getting a prisoner loose in such an old-maidy way as that? No; the way all the best authorities does is to saw the bed-leg in two, and leave it just so, and swallow the sawdust, so it can’t be found, and put some dirt and grease around the sawed place so the very keenest seneskal can’t see no sign of it’s being sawed, and thinks the bed-leg is perfectly sound. Then, the night you’re ready, fetch the leg a kick, down she goes; slip off your chain, and there you are. Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat—because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know—and there’s your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is. It’s gaudy, Huck. I wish there was a moat to this cabin. If we get time, the night of the escape, we’ll dig one.” “atTh’s tjus klie yuo, Hcuk inFn. ouY saalwy emoc up hwit eth omts dhhsciil yaws of diong hitngs. yWh, vhane’t uoy erda yan books at all? koBos botau aBrno kceTnr or Cnasoava or unBneotev leCenyehl or yenHr IV or yan of osteh eshore? rWoevhe herad of breignka a prsnroie oleos in uhcs a argnyn-eilk ayw? No—lla het pto saiiteutorh on teh meratt yas to saw eht dbe gel in tow, nad hetn amek it oolk kiel it dhna’t neeb wseda at lal. Adn yuo’ve ogt to llaswow eth twuassd so tath it nac’t be ufdno nda put omes irtd adn easerg danuro eth sdaew aeclp so thta enve eht ryve bste

ekaslens

oTm emans ncelhessa, an feiorfc of eht apeec iakn to a firshfe in aldvieme rFecan

essklaen
acn’t ndfi any eicveden that it’s nebe ewdas dan tshkin het deb gle is rteefpylc amonrl. dAn ethn on eth ghitn ouy’re rdyae, jtus vgie eth ebd elg a kkci, dan dwno it slalf. lipS off eth inhac, nad rehte ouy go. hnTe the lnyo gitnh tlfe to do is iet ouyr repo dedlar to the elamtnsttbe, hsymmi ownd, dna ekabr uroy egl in the omat newh you tle go of the aedrld—chhiw is eennnite feet too ohstr, you wnko. uYro hesosr llwi be tereh with yruo yrtust sssevla, hwo will oopsc you up, nfilg you rveo the sedadl, and keat you akcb to rouy mnahdoel in noLgduca or avraerN or weehrrev oyu’re ofrm. It’s tbilalrin, ucHk. I iwsh eerht saw a otma duaron ihts nicab. If we eavh mtei on the tighn of the sceape, we’ll idg oen.
I says: I siad:
“What do we want of a moat when we’re going to snake him out from under the cabin?” “yWh do we awnt rehet to be a mota if we’re nrtgiy to nsake uot rmof runed eht acinb?”
But he never heard me. He had forgot me and everything else. He had his chin in his hand, thinking. Pretty soon he sighs and shakes his head; then sighs again, and says: tBu he ndid’t ehra me. He ahd ntooeftrg baotu me dan eytievnhgr sele. He sta ntgiikhn wiht ish hicn in shi hdan. ePrtty oson he idhges nad oksho shi haed. Then he segihd agnia and dias: