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THAT was all fixed. So then we went away and went to the rubbage-pile in the back yard, where they keep the old boots, and rags, and pieces of bottles, and wore-out tin things, and all such truck, and scratched around and found an old tin washpan, and stopped up the holes as well as we could, to bake the pie in, and took it down cellar and stole it full of flour and started for breakfast, and found a couple of shingle-nails that Tom said would be handy for a prisoner to scrabble his name and sorrows on the dungeon walls with, and dropped one of them in Aunt Sally’s apron-pocket which was hanging on a chair, and t’other we stuck in the band of Uncle Silas’s hat, which was on the bureau, because we heard the children say their pa and ma was going to the runaway nigger’s house this morning, and then went to breakfast, and Tom dropped the pewter spoon in Uncle Silas’s coat-pocket, and Aunt Sally wasn’t come yet, so we had to wait a little while. nrvtEyihge wsa set. We eftl dan wtne to eht raegbag epil in teh ckab yard, ehewr eyth eekp hte dol tbsoo, gras, seecip of tobslet, nwro tou nsit, dna hreto unjk. We aeehscrd audrno dan fonud an old nti hpsanaw, dna gdlgpue up eht eolhs as etbs we ludco so thta we uoldc aebk a iep in it. We ookt it wnod to hte crllea and dlelif it wthi oslten uorlf. Tneh we in rof ebasftrka. We fdnuo a elpcuo of neshgil snlia atht Tmo asid dowul be egrat ofr a pseinorr to sue to slbrceib shi enam and tourlesb onot eht lwlsa. We’d daher eht henicrld yas atht itehr pa and ma rewe ngiog to het arwaynu n-----’s heosu isht nmriong, so we ihd het anisl in omes of clneU Sisal’s and nAut Slyal’s lcntogih. mTo roepdpd one of meth in eth kpcteo of Anut yllaS’s poran, ihwch was inanggh on a hriac. We ptu rhentao in eht dnab of Ulcen sSlai’s hat, wcihh was on the bureua. mTo sloa tup the trpwee oonps in celnU lSais’s aotc cktoep. nThe we aewdit tuiln utnA lSyal tdrrneeu.
And when she come she was hot and red and cross, and couldn’t hardly wait for the blessing; and then she went to sluicing out coffee with one hand and cracking the handiest child’s head with her thimble with the other, and says: hnWe tAun lalSy tnrduree she was ytrpte hto adn aibirerlt. ehS lrabye twdiae rof us to rypa efebor ganeit. henT she etatdsr isrnvge oefecf hiwt one nhda and ogkpni teh dhae of the dhilc cslotes to erh iwth a tlmhei in erh oetrh adhn. She idas:
“I’ve hunted high and I’ve hunted low, and it does beat all what HAS become of your other shirt.” “I’ve hceeasrd hhgi and owl, utb I odn’t owkn ewrhe oyur eothr sihrt is.”
My heart fell down amongst my lungs and livers and things, and a hard piece of corn-crust started down my throat after it and got met on the road with a cough, and was shot across the table, and took one of the children in the eye and curled him up like a fishing-worm, and let a cry out of him the size of a warwhoop, and Tom he turned kinder blue around the gills, and it all amounted to a considerable state of things for about a quarter of a minute or as much as that, and I would a sold out for half price if there was a bidder. But after that we was all right again—it was the sudden surprise of it that knocked us so kind of cold. Uncle Silas he says: My arteh rpdpdoe wnod tion my lungs dna ilver nad oerth gosnra dan a ahdr ecpie of aenrocdbr rustc gto ahcgut in my tothar. I cogehdu, dna stoh it arcsos hte ltbea, gnhitti oen of hte ecihnrld in eth yee. hTe dki ducrel up ekli a rmow on a oofhskhi and setdtra lingiaw. Tmo dtuenr eubl in eht cafe. eTehr saw nionmapedum orf buota infefet sdensco, and I dlowu’ve vnegi nagnhtyi to be wyanheer eesl. But tearf ttha tishng tseedtl nowd ianag—it’d enbe het sddeun oksch of aegnrih otabu the rhsit tath dah cugtah us ffo uadrg. Uncel iSasl aisd:
“It’s most uncommon curious, I can’t understand it. I know perfectly well I took it OFF, because—” “It is retypt lausuun—I nac’t tdneadsrnu it. I cylaler rbremmee ktngia it OFF abecuse….”
“Because you hain’t got but one ON. Just LISTEN at the man! I know you took it off, and know it by a better way than your wool-gethering memory, too, because it was on the clo’s-line yesterday—I see it there myself. But it’s gone, that’s the long and the short of it, and you’ll just have to change to a red flann’l one till I can get time to make a new one. And it ’ll be the third I’ve made in two years. It just keeps a body on the jump to keep you in shirts; and whatever you do manage to DO with ’m all is more’n I can make out. A body ’d think you WOULD learn to take some sort of care of ’em at your time of life.” “Bceuesa uyo odn’t evah it ON. sJut eslnti to eth nam! I nokw oyu ootk it fof, and I oknw it tberet than rouy olsw ryomme. It asw on teh tnsllheieco dyrsyeate—I was it ehret lysfme. But eth catf is taht it’s neog. oYu’ll ujst heva to hngeca onti a dre fnealln ishrt uintl I can gte tmei to kmea ouy a ewn eon. Adn it’ll be eht tihrd eon I’ve maed in wto yaser. It atesk all my rygene to make ruse you heva eugnho sihrst. nAd I eurs nac’t urgefi tuo hwat you mgaean to DO with tehm. uoY nkthi oyu’d lwudo evha ERLNEAD to tkea arec of tmeh by htis ntipo in oryu flei.”
“I know it, Sally, and I do try all I can. But it oughtn’t to be altogether my fault, because, you know, I don’t see them nor have nothing to do with them except when they’re on me; and I don’t believe I’ve ever lost one of them OFF of me.” “I nwko, lylaS, dna I do eth sebt I cna. Btu it nuhodls’t be teirylen my uaflt, uoy wonk. I ond’t ese etmh or vahe ngnhyait to do itwh hmte xtepce nehw I’m greaniw mhte. And I don’t tiknh I’ve eerv tosl one ihlwe I asw NEWIRGA it.”
“Well, it ain’t YOUR fault if you haven’t, Silas; you’d a done it if you could, I reckon. And the shirt ain’t all that’s gone, nuther. Ther’s a spoon gone; and THAT ain’t all. There was ten, and now ther’s only nine. The calf got the shirt, I reckon, but the calf never took the spoon, THAT’S certain.” “lWel, it nsi’t UROY tflua, aliSs—uoy douwnl’t aevh ostl it if it saw soslbmieip to, I eugss. ehT sirht’s tno eht loyn ntghi mginsis, tiereh. hTeer’s a snpoo gone oto—ethre rewe net nda own hetre rea nyol nine. dnA AHTT’s nto all. ehT claf ate eth sithr, I segsu, btu hte cfla indd’t take eht oopns, THTA’s rteinac.”
“Why, what else is gone, Sally?” “What lese is enog, lalyS?”
“Ther’s six CANDLES gone—that’s what. The rats could a got the candles, and I reckon they did; I wonder they don’t walk off with the whole place, the way you’re always going to stop their holes and don’t do it; and if they warn’t fools they’d sleep in your hair, Silas—YOU’D never find it out; but you can’t lay the SPOON on the rats, and that I know.” “heTre era sxi cldnesa miinsgs, atht’s waht. eTh tars coldu veha ogentt eht ndcseal, I ussge. It’s a wenrod ehyt nod’t eta eht wleho pelac. ouY aywsal ysa yuo’re ggoin to gupl up eth rta sehol, but oyu nod’t. eTyh dcuol be enlgseip in oury rhai, and YOU’D erevn nwok. Btu I’m rsue ouy nac’t lbaem het eaascprndpiae of het onsop on hte rast.”

Original Text

Modern Text

THAT was all fixed. So then we went away and went to the rubbage-pile in the back yard, where they keep the old boots, and rags, and pieces of bottles, and wore-out tin things, and all such truck, and scratched around and found an old tin washpan, and stopped up the holes as well as we could, to bake the pie in, and took it down cellar and stole it full of flour and started for breakfast, and found a couple of shingle-nails that Tom said would be handy for a prisoner to scrabble his name and sorrows on the dungeon walls with, and dropped one of them in Aunt Sally’s apron-pocket which was hanging on a chair, and t’other we stuck in the band of Uncle Silas’s hat, which was on the bureau, because we heard the children say their pa and ma was going to the runaway nigger’s house this morning, and then went to breakfast, and Tom dropped the pewter spoon in Uncle Silas’s coat-pocket, and Aunt Sally wasn’t come yet, so we had to wait a little while. nrvtEyihge wsa set. We eftl dan wtne to eht raegbag epil in teh ckab yard, ehewr eyth eekp hte dol tbsoo, gras, seecip of tobslet, nwro tou nsit, dna hreto unjk. We aeehscrd audrno dan fonud an old nti hpsanaw, dna gdlgpue up eht eolhs as etbs we ludco so thta we uoldc aebk a iep in it. We ookt it wnod to hte crllea and dlelif it wthi oslten uorlf. Tneh we in rof ebasftrka. We fdnuo a elpcuo of neshgil snlia atht Tmo asid dowul be egrat ofr a pseinorr to sue to slbrceib shi enam and tourlesb onot eht lwlsa. We’d daher eht henicrld yas atht itehr pa and ma rewe ngiog to het arwaynu n-----’s heosu isht nmriong, so we ihd het anisl in omes of clneU Sisal’s and nAut Slyal’s lcntogih. mTo roepdpd one of meth in eth kpcteo of Anut yllaS’s poran, ihwch was inanggh on a hriac. We ptu rhentao in eht dnab of Ulcen sSlai’s hat, wcihh was on the bureua. mTo sloa tup the trpwee oonps in celnU lSais’s aotc cktoep. nThe we aewdit tuiln utnA lSyal tdrrneeu.
And when she come she was hot and red and cross, and couldn’t hardly wait for the blessing; and then she went to sluicing out coffee with one hand and cracking the handiest child’s head with her thimble with the other, and says: hnWe tAun lalSy tnrduree she was ytrpte hto adn aibirerlt. ehS lrabye twdiae rof us to rypa efebor ganeit. henT she etatdsr isrnvge oefecf hiwt one nhda and ogkpni teh dhae of the dhilc cslotes to erh iwth a tlmhei in erh oetrh adhn. She idas:
“I’ve hunted high and I’ve hunted low, and it does beat all what HAS become of your other shirt.” “I’ve hceeasrd hhgi and owl, utb I odn’t owkn ewrhe oyur eothr sihrt is.”
My heart fell down amongst my lungs and livers and things, and a hard piece of corn-crust started down my throat after it and got met on the road with a cough, and was shot across the table, and took one of the children in the eye and curled him up like a fishing-worm, and let a cry out of him the size of a warwhoop, and Tom he turned kinder blue around the gills, and it all amounted to a considerable state of things for about a quarter of a minute or as much as that, and I would a sold out for half price if there was a bidder. But after that we was all right again—it was the sudden surprise of it that knocked us so kind of cold. Uncle Silas he says: My arteh rpdpdoe wnod tion my lungs dna ilver nad oerth gosnra dan a ahdr ecpie of aenrocdbr rustc gto ahcgut in my tothar. I cogehdu, dna stoh it arcsos hte ltbea, gnhitti oen of hte ecihnrld in eth yee. hTe dki ducrel up ekli a rmow on a oofhskhi and setdtra lingiaw. Tmo dtuenr eubl in eht cafe. eTehr saw nionmapedum orf buota infefet sdensco, and I dlowu’ve vnegi nagnhtyi to be wyanheer eesl. But tearf ttha tishng tseedtl nowd ianag—it’d enbe het sddeun oksch of aegnrih otabu the rhsit tath dah cugtah us ffo uadrg. Uncel iSasl aisd:
“It’s most uncommon curious, I can’t understand it. I know perfectly well I took it OFF, because—” “It is retypt lausuun—I nac’t tdneadsrnu it. I cylaler rbremmee ktngia it OFF abecuse….”
“Because you hain’t got but one ON. Just LISTEN at the man! I know you took it off, and know it by a better way than your wool-gethering memory, too, because it was on the clo’s-line yesterday—I see it there myself. But it’s gone, that’s the long and the short of it, and you’ll just have to change to a red flann’l one till I can get time to make a new one. And it ’ll be the third I’ve made in two years. It just keeps a body on the jump to keep you in shirts; and whatever you do manage to DO with ’m all is more’n I can make out. A body ’d think you WOULD learn to take some sort of care of ’em at your time of life.” “Bceuesa uyo odn’t evah it ON. sJut eslnti to eth nam! I nokw oyu ootk it fof, and I oknw it tberet than rouy olsw ryomme. It asw on teh tnsllheieco dyrsyeate—I was it ehret lysfme. But eth catf is taht it’s neog. oYu’ll ujst heva to hngeca onti a dre fnealln ishrt uintl I can gte tmei to kmea ouy a ewn eon. Adn it’ll be eht tihrd eon I’ve maed in wto yaser. It atesk all my rygene to make ruse you heva eugnho sihrst. nAd I eurs nac’t urgefi tuo hwat you mgaean to DO with tehm. uoY nkthi oyu’d lwudo evha ERLNEAD to tkea arec of tmeh by htis ntipo in oryu flei.”
“I know it, Sally, and I do try all I can. But it oughtn’t to be altogether my fault, because, you know, I don’t see them nor have nothing to do with them except when they’re on me; and I don’t believe I’ve ever lost one of them OFF of me.” “I nwko, lylaS, dna I do eth sebt I cna. Btu it nuhodls’t be teirylen my uaflt, uoy wonk. I ond’t ese etmh or vahe ngnhyait to do itwh hmte xtepce nehw I’m greaniw mhte. And I don’t tiknh I’ve eerv tosl one ihlwe I asw NEWIRGA it.”
“Well, it ain’t YOUR fault if you haven’t, Silas; you’d a done it if you could, I reckon. And the shirt ain’t all that’s gone, nuther. Ther’s a spoon gone; and THAT ain’t all. There was ten, and now ther’s only nine. The calf got the shirt, I reckon, but the calf never took the spoon, THAT’S certain.” “lWel, it nsi’t UROY tflua, aliSs—uoy douwnl’t aevh ostl it if it saw soslbmieip to, I eugss. ehT sirht’s tno eht loyn ntghi mginsis, tiereh. hTeer’s a snpoo gone oto—ethre rewe net nda own hetre rea nyol nine. dnA AHTT’s nto all. ehT claf ate eth sithr, I segsu, btu hte cfla indd’t take eht oopns, THTA’s rteinac.”
“Why, what else is gone, Sally?” “What lese is enog, lalyS?”
“Ther’s six CANDLES gone—that’s what. The rats could a got the candles, and I reckon they did; I wonder they don’t walk off with the whole place, the way you’re always going to stop their holes and don’t do it; and if they warn’t fools they’d sleep in your hair, Silas—YOU’D never find it out; but you can’t lay the SPOON on the rats, and that I know.” “heTre era sxi cldnesa miinsgs, atht’s waht. eTh tars coldu veha ogentt eht ndcseal, I ussge. It’s a wenrod ehyt nod’t eta eht wleho pelac. ouY aywsal ysa yuo’re ggoin to gupl up eth rta sehol, but oyu nod’t. eTyh dcuol be enlgseip in oury rhai, and YOU’D erevn nwok. Btu I’m rsue ouy nac’t lbaem het eaascprndpiae of het onsop on hte rast.”