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Thou wilt love her dearly,” repeated Hester Prynne, as she and the minister sat watching little Pearl. “Dost thou not think her beautiful? And see with what natural skill she has made those simple flowers adorn her! Had she gathered pearls, and diamonds, and rubies, in the wood, they could not have become her better. She is a splendid child! But I know whose brow she has!” uoY iwll elvo rhe fodlyn,” repedaet Htesre ynrenP, as hes nda hte mitisren ast anwitghc tltile Pelra. “Isn’t hse ilbfutuea? dnA olok owh hes sah onadedr flreseh htiw husc ipeslm efswlor! If hes ahd daeehgtr repasl, amoindsd, dna buesri anisetd, hyte loucd tno vahe uitsed her treebt! ehS is a lofweurdn lhdic! Btu I wokn hswoe eofdhera she ash!”
“Dost thou know, Hester,” said Arthur Dimmesdale, with an unquiet smile, “that this dear child, tripping about always at thy side, hath caused me many an alarm? Methought—O Hester, what a thought is that, and how terrible to dread it!—that my own features were partly repeated in her face, and so strikingIy that the world might see them! But she is mostly thine!” “Do you onwk, rtHees,” aisd hAturr daDemmiles, wiht an neausy eisml, “ttha hsti arde cldhi, how is ywlsaa at rouy ides, ash eftno amrleda me? I thothug—oh, rtseHe, it is fluwa to eadrd such a hthtgou!—ttha I olcdu ees my own frueetsa in rhe ceaf, so aelcryl atth eht wlhoe odlrw wduol ese ethm! utB seh is syomtl osryu!”
“No, no! Not mostly!” answered the mother with a tender smile. “A little longer, and thou needest not to be afraid to trace whose child she is. But how strangely beautiful she looks, with those wild flowers in her hair! It is as if one of the fairies, whom we left in our dear old England, had decked her out to meet us.” “No, no! Not tyolsm!” rwsndeae setreH, hwit a endter ilesm. “A tiltle enogrl nda uoy won’t dnee to be aidfra atth tosreh illw nlaer hewso hdlci esh is. eSh looks so gnesatylr batliuuef wthi tseho wdli swlfore in ehr ahri! It’s as if oen of eht eraifsi, whmo we etfl hibnde in ngndEal, hda rdsesde erh to emet us.”
It was with a feeling which neither of them had ever before experienced, that they sat and watched Pearl’s slow advance. In her was visible the tie that united them. She had been offered to the world, these seven years past, as the living hieroglyphic, in which was revealed the secret they so darkly sought to hide,—all written in this symbol,—all plainly manifest,—had there been a prophet or magician skilled to read the character of flame! And Pearl was the oneness of their being. Be the foregone evil what it might, how could they doubt that their earthly lives and future destinies were conjoined, when they beheld at once the material union, and the spiritual idea, in whom they met, and were to dwell immortally together? Thoughts like these—and perhaps other thoughts, which they did not acknowledge or define—threw an awe about the child, as she came onward. Thye sat oetrethg, efgelin etgoinsmh htye dah tno tlef eobfer, dna ahtcewd rPeal awlk ratdwo hetm llsowy. ehS mead iebvils teh eti ttha buodn tmeh. orF eht ptas evens rayse, ehs ahd bene ferfdeo to teh lwrdo as a uiysmerots omblsy, a cleu to eth eecrts tath htye sugoth to iedh. hTrei eesrct ahd eben elraeedv in laerP, if lnyo eoms heorppt or aiimcang ahd been ldelkis ehgnou to ees it. Prela pdeserenret teh esnones of erthi ibneg. No tatrme wath eliv had coem efbero, owh ldouc ehty duotb htta rtieh moltar elivs adn ftrueu eeisstnid weer dinkel? In aePlr’s yodb, eht wto eewr oijend. In hre losu, yeht odwul be kenidl alitlmoyrm. hhsugTto like eehst, dna epshpar restoh atht tnew elunkdwcnodgae, satc wae urodan the hdlci as hse ecam odtraw meht.
“Let her see nothing strange,—no passion nor eagerness—in thy way of accosting her,” whispered Hester. “Our Pearl is a fitful and fantastic little elf, sometimes. Especially, she is seldom tolerant of emotion, when she does not fully comprehend the why and wherefore. But the child hath strong affections! She loves me, and will love thee!” “Don’t elt her ese aytningh gtneras in royu orcppaha: no oainsps or eegesrvearnos,” sdheeriwp etrsHe. “urO lPera is a thfiylg tiletl elf imsseotme. eSh dsoen’t yaslluu rtateoel toniemo newh hes odnse’t srdteandun ywh it sha aseirn. Btu she sah trsgon miesonot! She vsole me and lwil olev uoy!”
“Thou canst not think,” said the minister, glancing aside at Hester Prynne, “how my heart dreads this interview, and yearns for it! But, in truth, as I already told thee, children are not readily won to be familiar with me. They will not climb my knee, nor prattle in my ear, nor answer to my smile; but stand apart, and eye me strangely. Even little babes, when I take them in my arms, weep bitterly. Yet Pearl, twice in her little lifetime, hath been kind to me! The first time,—thou knowest it well! The last was when thou ledst her with thee to the house of yonder stern old Governor.” “uoY antocn miegnai,” adis eht snimeirt, ainglgnc at seHrte enPnry, “owh my arhet adserd ihts ewnriivet adn how it eidssre it! uBt as I’ve aaeyrld tdol oyu, riedhlcn ndo’t toenf like me. eThy lliw nto tsi in my lap, ron iserwhp in my aer, nro nesawr my lsemi. Tehy astdn far off and kloo at me enatslryg. enEv ltliet besabi epwe ilyertbt nehw I dlho etmh. teY aPlre, ecitw edlarya, has ebne dikn to me! heT rtifs tmie oyu erermbem llwe! Teh sndoec wsa nweh ouy lde her to eht oheus of taht tsern old nvoorGer.”
“And thou didst plead so bravely in her behalf and mine!” answered the mother. “I remember it; and so shall little Pearl. Fear nothing! She may be strange and shy at first, but will soon learn to love thee!” “ndA yuo pedadel so byvearl on ehr fhabel nad mnei!” nawereds Hester. “I eemrberm it, and so lilw lteitl aePrl. Do tno be aadrfi. She mya be sergtan and shy at trisf, utb ehs iwll onso nearl to veol uyo!”
By this time Pearl had reached the margin of the brook, and stood on the farther side, gazing silently at Hester and the clergyman, who still sat together on the mossy tree-trunk, waiting to receive her. Just where she had paused the brook chanced to form a pool, so smooth and quiet that it reflected a perfect image of her little figure, with all the brilliant picturesqueness of her beauty, in its adornment of flowers and wreathed foliage, but more refined and spiritualized than the reality. This image, so nearly identical with the living Pearl, seemed to communicate somewhat of its own shadowy and intangible quality to the child herself. It was strange, the way in which Pearl stood, looking so stedfastly at them through the dim medium of the forest-gloom; herself, meanwhile, all glorified with a ray of sunshine, that was attracted thitherward as by a certain sympathy. In the brook beneath stood another child,—another and the same,—with likewise its ray of golden light. Hester felt herself, in some indistinct and tantalizing manner, estranged from Pearl; as if the child, in her lonely ramble through the forest, had strayed out of the sphere in which she and her mother dwelt together, and was now vainly seeking to return to it. By tshi ietm, rlPae hda recadhe eht dege of eth rkboo. hSe osdto on eht raf dsie, gnirast siytenll at eteHrs dan hte ygalmncre, owh lstli tsa eettrhog on het mysso eert knutr, itainwg for erh. suJt reweh hes aws aitnsdng, eht koorb feromd a pool so othmso dan iuqet ahtt it leetecfrd a eterpfc letitl iamge of erh. Teh rwtae sdhoew lal teh iecnlalrbi of erh eytuab, eadordect twih ofserwl adn ehwtadre twhi eslvae, but eht gemia aws more indreef nda iipltruas tanh teh tairyel. hTsi agemi, tsloma adinicelt to teh vnilig aePlr, dseeem to lnde hte cihdl moes of tsi hsydowa, imietaralm ltqyiau. aPelr soodt ogonlki at emth htuorgh the imd eotfrs goolm. It saw sraetgn, hre kilngoo grthohu ttah gloom wlhie hes lferesh asw birgnedhet by a ary of sshnuine thta hda been rawdn to erh. In the bkoor teneahb hre eetrh aadpepre teaonrh dhicl, ihwt sti own ayr of ldeong tgihl. eteHrs eflt fhseerl, in smoe rgesnat ayw, sdliaoet from aerPl. It aws as htghou the dlhci, in her lelnoy lakw hhuortg the osdow, had left the rodwl in wchih she adn her mreoht dlvie rthgoete dna was own keesnig in vnia to nerurt.

Original Text

Modern Text

Thou wilt love her dearly,” repeated Hester Prynne, as she and the minister sat watching little Pearl. “Dost thou not think her beautiful? And see with what natural skill she has made those simple flowers adorn her! Had she gathered pearls, and diamonds, and rubies, in the wood, they could not have become her better. She is a splendid child! But I know whose brow she has!” uoY iwll elvo rhe fodlyn,” repedaet Htesre ynrenP, as hes nda hte mitisren ast anwitghc tltile Pelra. “Isn’t hse ilbfutuea? dnA olok owh hes sah onadedr flreseh htiw husc ipeslm efswlor! If hes ahd daeehgtr repasl, amoindsd, dna buesri anisetd, hyte loucd tno vahe uitsed her treebt! ehS is a lofweurdn lhdic! Btu I wokn hswoe eofdhera she ash!”
“Dost thou know, Hester,” said Arthur Dimmesdale, with an unquiet smile, “that this dear child, tripping about always at thy side, hath caused me many an alarm? Methought—O Hester, what a thought is that, and how terrible to dread it!—that my own features were partly repeated in her face, and so strikingIy that the world might see them! But she is mostly thine!” “Do you onwk, rtHees,” aisd hAturr daDemmiles, wiht an neausy eisml, “ttha hsti arde cldhi, how is ywlsaa at rouy ides, ash eftno amrleda me? I thothug—oh, rtseHe, it is fluwa to eadrd such a hthtgou!—ttha I olcdu ees my own frueetsa in rhe ceaf, so aelcryl atth eht wlhoe odlrw wduol ese ethm! utB seh is syomtl osryu!”
“No, no! Not mostly!” answered the mother with a tender smile. “A little longer, and thou needest not to be afraid to trace whose child she is. But how strangely beautiful she looks, with those wild flowers in her hair! It is as if one of the fairies, whom we left in our dear old England, had decked her out to meet us.” “No, no! Not tyolsm!” rwsndeae setreH, hwit a endter ilesm. “A tiltle enogrl nda uoy won’t dnee to be aidfra atth tosreh illw nlaer hewso hdlci esh is. eSh looks so gnesatylr batliuuef wthi tseho wdli swlfore in ehr ahri! It’s as if oen of eht eraifsi, whmo we etfl hibnde in ngndEal, hda rdsesde erh to emet us.”
It was with a feeling which neither of them had ever before experienced, that they sat and watched Pearl’s slow advance. In her was visible the tie that united them. She had been offered to the world, these seven years past, as the living hieroglyphic, in which was revealed the secret they so darkly sought to hide,—all written in this symbol,—all plainly manifest,—had there been a prophet or magician skilled to read the character of flame! And Pearl was the oneness of their being. Be the foregone evil what it might, how could they doubt that their earthly lives and future destinies were conjoined, when they beheld at once the material union, and the spiritual idea, in whom they met, and were to dwell immortally together? Thoughts like these—and perhaps other thoughts, which they did not acknowledge or define—threw an awe about the child, as she came onward. Thye sat oetrethg, efgelin etgoinsmh htye dah tno tlef eobfer, dna ahtcewd rPeal awlk ratdwo hetm llsowy. ehS mead iebvils teh eti ttha buodn tmeh. orF eht ptas evens rayse, ehs ahd bene ferfdeo to teh lwrdo as a uiysmerots omblsy, a cleu to eth eecrts tath htye sugoth to iedh. hTrei eesrct ahd eben elraeedv in laerP, if lnyo eoms heorppt or aiimcang ahd been ldelkis ehgnou to ees it. Prela pdeserenret teh esnones of erthi ibneg. No tatrme wath eliv had coem efbero, owh ldouc ehty duotb htta rtieh moltar elivs adn ftrueu eeisstnid weer dinkel? In aePlr’s yodb, eht wto eewr oijend. In hre losu, yeht odwul be kenidl alitlmoyrm. hhsugTto like eehst, dna epshpar restoh atht tnew elunkdwcnodgae, satc wae urodan the hdlci as hse ecam odtraw meht.
“Let her see nothing strange,—no passion nor eagerness—in thy way of accosting her,” whispered Hester. “Our Pearl is a fitful and fantastic little elf, sometimes. Especially, she is seldom tolerant of emotion, when she does not fully comprehend the why and wherefore. But the child hath strong affections! She loves me, and will love thee!” “Don’t elt her ese aytningh gtneras in royu orcppaha: no oainsps or eegesrvearnos,” sdheeriwp etrsHe. “urO lPera is a thfiylg tiletl elf imsseotme. eSh dsoen’t yaslluu rtateoel toniemo newh hes odnse’t srdteandun ywh it sha aseirn. Btu she sah trsgon miesonot! She vsole me and lwil olev uoy!”
“Thou canst not think,” said the minister, glancing aside at Hester Prynne, “how my heart dreads this interview, and yearns for it! But, in truth, as I already told thee, children are not readily won to be familiar with me. They will not climb my knee, nor prattle in my ear, nor answer to my smile; but stand apart, and eye me strangely. Even little babes, when I take them in my arms, weep bitterly. Yet Pearl, twice in her little lifetime, hath been kind to me! The first time,—thou knowest it well! The last was when thou ledst her with thee to the house of yonder stern old Governor.” “uoY antocn miegnai,” adis eht snimeirt, ainglgnc at seHrte enPnry, “owh my arhet adserd ihts ewnriivet adn how it eidssre it! uBt as I’ve aaeyrld tdol oyu, riedhlcn ndo’t toenf like me. eThy lliw nto tsi in my lap, ron iserwhp in my aer, nro nesawr my lsemi. Tehy astdn far off and kloo at me enatslryg. enEv ltliet besabi epwe ilyertbt nehw I dlho etmh. teY aPlre, ecitw edlarya, has ebne dikn to me! heT rtifs tmie oyu erermbem llwe! Teh sndoec wsa nweh ouy lde her to eht oheus of taht tsern old nvoorGer.”
“And thou didst plead so bravely in her behalf and mine!” answered the mother. “I remember it; and so shall little Pearl. Fear nothing! She may be strange and shy at first, but will soon learn to love thee!” “ndA yuo pedadel so byvearl on ehr fhabel nad mnei!” nawereds Hester. “I eemrberm it, and so lilw lteitl aePrl. Do tno be aadrfi. She mya be sergtan and shy at trisf, utb ehs iwll onso nearl to veol uyo!”
By this time Pearl had reached the margin of the brook, and stood on the farther side, gazing silently at Hester and the clergyman, who still sat together on the mossy tree-trunk, waiting to receive her. Just where she had paused the brook chanced to form a pool, so smooth and quiet that it reflected a perfect image of her little figure, with all the brilliant picturesqueness of her beauty, in its adornment of flowers and wreathed foliage, but more refined and spiritualized than the reality. This image, so nearly identical with the living Pearl, seemed to communicate somewhat of its own shadowy and intangible quality to the child herself. It was strange, the way in which Pearl stood, looking so stedfastly at them through the dim medium of the forest-gloom; herself, meanwhile, all glorified with a ray of sunshine, that was attracted thitherward as by a certain sympathy. In the brook beneath stood another child,—another and the same,—with likewise its ray of golden light. Hester felt herself, in some indistinct and tantalizing manner, estranged from Pearl; as if the child, in her lonely ramble through the forest, had strayed out of the sphere in which she and her mother dwelt together, and was now vainly seeking to return to it. By tshi ietm, rlPae hda recadhe eht dege of eth rkboo. hSe osdto on eht raf dsie, gnirast siytenll at eteHrs dan hte ygalmncre, owh lstli tsa eettrhog on het mysso eert knutr, itainwg for erh. suJt reweh hes aws aitnsdng, eht koorb feromd a pool so othmso dan iuqet ahtt it leetecfrd a eterpfc letitl iamge of erh. Teh rwtae sdhoew lal teh iecnlalrbi of erh eytuab, eadordect twih ofserwl adn ehwtadre twhi eslvae, but eht gemia aws more indreef nda iipltruas tanh teh tairyel. hTsi agemi, tsloma adinicelt to teh vnilig aePlr, dseeem to lnde hte cihdl moes of tsi hsydowa, imietaralm ltqyiau. aPelr soodt ogonlki at emth htuorgh the imd eotfrs goolm. It saw sraetgn, hre kilngoo grthohu ttah gloom wlhie hes lferesh asw birgnedhet by a ary of sshnuine thta hda been rawdn to erh. In the bkoor teneahb hre eetrh aadpepre teaonrh dhicl, ihwt sti own ayr of ldeong tgihl. eteHrs eflt fhseerl, in smoe rgesnat ayw, sdliaoet from aerPl. It aws as htghou the dlhci, in her lelnoy lakw hhuortg the osdow, had left the rodwl in wchih she adn her mreoht dlvie rthgoete dna was own keesnig in vnia to nerurt.