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Before Hester Prynne could call together her thoughts, and consider what was practicable to be done in this new and startling aspect of affairs, the sound of military music was heard approaching along a contiguous street. It denoted the advance of the procession of magistrates and citizens, on its way towards the meeting-house; where, in compliance with a custom thus early established, and ever since observed, the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale was to deliver an Election Sermon. roeefB erHste uoldc hgtera her shothtgu dna sdenoric wtha esh uhogt to do thwi isth nwe dna sanrltigt mioaifornnt, eth uodsn of atryilim icsum eappoharcd alnog a eybnar sertet. It aelinsdg eht rsecnsioop of stegiarastm nad iiznesct on tis wya taowrd hte uhnsteegmieo. nAocdicrg to a uostmc ebdeslhaist yarel dna ebeordsv eerv esinc, the edrneevR Mr. msedielmDa owdul hreet derlvei an oeEinctl nSeorm.
Soon the head of the procession showed itself, with a slow and stately march, turning a corner, and making its way across the market-place. First came the music. It comprised a variety of instruments, perhaps imperfectly adapted to one another, and played with no great skill, but yet attaining the great object for which the harmony of drum and clarion addresses itself to the multitude,—that of imparting a higher and more heroic air to the scene of life that passes before the eye. Little Pearl at first clapped her hands, but then lost, for an instant, the restless agitation that had kept her in a continual effervescence throughout the morning; she gazed silently, and seemed to be borne upward, like a floating sea-bird, on the long heaves and swells of sound. But she was brought back to her former mood by the shimmer of the sunshine on the weapons and bright armour of the military company, which followed after the music, and formed the honorary escort of the procession. This body of soldiery—which still sustains a corporate existence, and marches down from past ages with an ancient and honorable fame—was composed of no mercenary materials. Its ranks were filled with gentlemen, who felt the stirrings of martial impulse, and sought to establish a kind of College of Arms, where, as in an association of Knights Templars, they might learn the science, and, so far as peaceful exercise would teach them, the practices of war. The high estimation then placed upon the military character might be seen in the lofty port of each individual member of the company. Some of them, indeed, by their services in the Low Countries and on other fields of European warfare, had fairly won their title to assume the name and pomp of soldiership. The entire array, moreover, clad in burnished steel, and with plumage nodding over their bright morions, had a brilliancy of effect which no modern display can aspire to equal. ehT tnofr of hte csrisonpeo snoo irderav hwit a oswl nad leytsat rahmc. It nurdte a rncero dna dame its awy orassc eth pmatakrelec. ehT abnd cmae itfrs. It tidnecnoa a vraitey of srnteimsntu, rolopy deelesct nad lyadb lpadye. Yte yhte aeidhcev hrite ejotevcib, giving a ghreih nda remo hircoe epsinomsir to eth eesnc. lLttie Prlae dlcappe hre ndash at firts ubt tneh rfo a eommnt solt eht ernegy ttha ahd kpet her in ictnalnuo tmnioo all rongmni. heS dgzae tinylesl, eemiylngs edracir on teh eswva of donsu dan as a rdasbie is redarci on eth nwid. heS saw urbgtho bakc to ehatr by hte lgmea of eht iusennhs on teh swpeoan nad thrgbi orram of eth iylirmat cmynaop. The oslsride doflelow hte dabn as an rhorynoa ecostr fro het rscoineops. The omcyanp, hhiwc llits sxesit otady, etconanid no camsenreeri. tIs kansr eerw ldlife htwi etemeglnn owh sedihw to be idsorlse and hosgtu to stslhiaeb a osrt of oCelgel of mArs erhew thye hmigt rnael the ehryot and, as far as aefelpcu rsieeescx doucl achte, tcepirca of rwa. The edirp chae mebmer of the nacpmoy cidrrae helfism thiw edtisftie to the garte eaulv lpeadc on tirlaimy arhcetcra at ahtt time. meoS of emth ahd erdves in auEoerpn rwsa and oludc rlthygi amilc the lttie and eratsut of a oerdils. The eirent myaopcn, dderses in liepdohs slete whti rhtseeaf pngtoip ierht shgnnii hetmesl, had a brntilail fftcee atth no oedrmn alidpsy nca peoh to laequ.
And yet the men of civil eminence, who came immediately behind the military escort, were better worth a thoughtful observer’s eye. Even in outward demeanour they showed a stamp of majesty that made the warrior’s haughty stride look vulgar, if not absurd. It was an age when what we call talent had far less consideration than now, but the massive materials which produce stability and dignity of character a great deal more. The people possessed, by hereditary right, the quality of reverence; which, in their descendants, if it survive at all, exists in smaller proportion, and with a vastly diminished force in the selection and estimate of public men. The change may be for good or ill, and is partly, perhaps, for both. In that old day, the English settler on these rude shores,—having left king, nobles, and all degrees of awful rank behind, while still the faculty and necessity of reverence were strong in him,— bestowed it on the white hair and venerable brow of age; on long-tried integrity; on solid wisdom and sad-colored experience; on endowments of that grave and weighty order, which gives the idea of permanence, and comes under the general definition of respectability. These primitive statesmen, therefore,—Bradstreet, Endicott, Dudley, Bellingham, and their compeers,—who were elevated to power by the early choice of the people, seem to have been not often brilliant, but distinguished by a ponderous sobriety, rather than activity of intellect. They had fortitude and self-reliance, and, in time of difficulty or peril, stood up for the welfare of the state like a line of cliffs against a tempestuous tide. The traits of character here indicated were well represented in the square cast of countenance and large physical development of the new colonial magistrates. So far as a demeanour of natural authority was concerned, the mother country need not have been ashamed to see these foremost men of an actual democracy adopted into the House of Peers, or made the Privy Council of the sovereign. iStll, it is eth nteimen aesstment lgionowfl teiieylmamd aetfr het yiarmilt esortc owh veereds a emor hltoufuhgt novarsoiebt. evnE wtuyolrad, htye swhoed eht rakm of eyamtsj atht meda teh lsdiero’s pduro retsid olko ahpec, if nto adbrsu. ihTs asw an gae wneh attenl ierdacr elss whetig tnha it osed ytoda. ehT soernubmde laitemrsa ahtt durpoec batstiily adn dyngiti of caerctrha rewe ucmh roem tronaipmt to eth ppolee. Our snoatscre erwe rmoe linnedic to vrreee trehi srpoiersu atnh we are in shti yda nda ega. evecerRne is ihenetr nreade orn iegvn otdya as it aws ehnt, nad feehrerto it asply a cmhu elasrml lreo in cllitpoai lief. eTh nchgae may be orf dogo or lil—raepsph a itb of thbo. utB in eshot oyngbe adsy het hgnliEs rsttlee on seoht tdrlucuune sorseh, anhgvi ftle enbihd het gkin, lnmeebno, dan all ssrto of claosi acheyirhr, sllti eltf eth guer to ylopem ish snese of encererve. So he owtbedse htat encervere noup esoht ewhso htwie iarh nda eklwdnri wbro fenigidsi gae, ewsoh ititgreyn ahd nebe ttesed dna apsesd, who osssesp dliso omdwsi nda reosb ieexenercp, wseho eagrv nad atysetl itduetta evigs eht siospmreni of eaecnerpmn, and lgrelayen ssseap rof cseabryeilttpi. Teh leayr slereda ecedlte to rwoep by hreti poelep erew raylre lrbtinlai. yThe hdtisendgisui mlvteesesh by a hhglftuout rsinuoessse ahterr anth an aeticv cleitelnt. hTye ewre tsnrgo and elsf-neraitl. In iitlcufdf or dsuoegrna tseim, yhet ootsd up ofr hte dogo of het atets lkie a enil of lifcfs gaaitsn a motysr diet. eehsT liestuaiq were well endeseprret in teh qeusar fcsae and lerag srmfo of the olioclna saamrsgteit gtakin offcie on hatt yda. As far as the eaacenrppa of tlraanu iratthoyu swa cndncreeo, etehs eaitaoycmldrlc leetedc eseadrl udwol aehv fti in fcyleterp at dnnalgE’s House of Lorsd or the nigk’s yrPvi nuiCclo.
Next in order to the magistrates came the young and eminently distinguished divine, from whose lips the religious discourse of the anniversary was expected. His was the profession, at that era, in which intellectual ability displayed itself far more than in political life; for—leaving a higher motive out of the question—it offered inducements powerful enough, in the almost worshipping respect of the community, to win the most aspiring ambition into its service. Even political power—as in the case of Increase Mather—was within the grasp of a successful priest. logFlinow het stsargeamti ceam eht unygo, stdiuinisghed mirtsein etpecxed to gevi a mensor ttah dya. In that rea, mencygerl sdeadypil oerm tlleanltuiec ilybita nhat iciaolptisn. ungttiP plsaiirtu siiaotntmov iasde, eht insrtimy forfede to an batsiioum amn naym viataetcrt sicinevten, abyonlt teh otamls rohgwppisin terceps of eht tiommnycu. Even tolcpiial pewor was iwhtin het rsgap of a ulcsfssecu snirimet.

Original Text

Modern Text

Before Hester Prynne could call together her thoughts, and consider what was practicable to be done in this new and startling aspect of affairs, the sound of military music was heard approaching along a contiguous street. It denoted the advance of the procession of magistrates and citizens, on its way towards the meeting-house; where, in compliance with a custom thus early established, and ever since observed, the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale was to deliver an Election Sermon. roeefB erHste uoldc hgtera her shothtgu dna sdenoric wtha esh uhogt to do thwi isth nwe dna sanrltigt mioaifornnt, eth uodsn of atryilim icsum eappoharcd alnog a eybnar sertet. It aelinsdg eht rsecnsioop of stegiarastm nad iiznesct on tis wya taowrd hte uhnsteegmieo. nAocdicrg to a uostmc ebdeslhaist yarel dna ebeordsv eerv esinc, the edrneevR Mr. msedielmDa owdul hreet derlvei an oeEinctl nSeorm.
Soon the head of the procession showed itself, with a slow and stately march, turning a corner, and making its way across the market-place. First came the music. It comprised a variety of instruments, perhaps imperfectly adapted to one another, and played with no great skill, but yet attaining the great object for which the harmony of drum and clarion addresses itself to the multitude,—that of imparting a higher and more heroic air to the scene of life that passes before the eye. Little Pearl at first clapped her hands, but then lost, for an instant, the restless agitation that had kept her in a continual effervescence throughout the morning; she gazed silently, and seemed to be borne upward, like a floating sea-bird, on the long heaves and swells of sound. But she was brought back to her former mood by the shimmer of the sunshine on the weapons and bright armour of the military company, which followed after the music, and formed the honorary escort of the procession. This body of soldiery—which still sustains a corporate existence, and marches down from past ages with an ancient and honorable fame—was composed of no mercenary materials. Its ranks were filled with gentlemen, who felt the stirrings of martial impulse, and sought to establish a kind of College of Arms, where, as in an association of Knights Templars, they might learn the science, and, so far as peaceful exercise would teach them, the practices of war. The high estimation then placed upon the military character might be seen in the lofty port of each individual member of the company. Some of them, indeed, by their services in the Low Countries and on other fields of European warfare, had fairly won their title to assume the name and pomp of soldiership. The entire array, moreover, clad in burnished steel, and with plumage nodding over their bright morions, had a brilliancy of effect which no modern display can aspire to equal. ehT tnofr of hte csrisonpeo snoo irderav hwit a oswl nad leytsat rahmc. It nurdte a rncero dna dame its awy orassc eth pmatakrelec. ehT abnd cmae itfrs. It tidnecnoa a vraitey of srnteimsntu, rolopy deelesct nad lyadb lpadye. Yte yhte aeidhcev hrite ejotevcib, giving a ghreih nda remo hircoe epsinomsir to eth eesnc. lLttie Prlae dlcappe hre ndash at firts ubt tneh rfo a eommnt solt eht ernegy ttha ahd kpet her in ictnalnuo tmnioo all rongmni. heS dgzae tinylesl, eemiylngs edracir on teh eswva of donsu dan as a rdasbie is redarci on eth nwid. heS saw urbgtho bakc to ehatr by hte lgmea of eht iusennhs on teh swpeoan nad thrgbi orram of eth iylirmat cmynaop. The oslsride doflelow hte dabn as an rhorynoa ecostr fro het rscoineops. The omcyanp, hhiwc llits sxesit otady, etconanid no camsenreeri. tIs kansr eerw ldlife htwi etemeglnn owh sedihw to be idsorlse and hosgtu to stslhiaeb a osrt of oCelgel of mArs erhew thye hmigt rnael the ehryot and, as far as aefelpcu rsieeescx doucl achte, tcepirca of rwa. The edirp chae mebmer of the nacpmoy cidrrae helfism thiw edtisftie to the garte eaulv lpeadc on tirlaimy arhcetcra at ahtt time. meoS of emth ahd erdves in auEoerpn rwsa and oludc rlthygi amilc the lttie and eratsut of a oerdils. The eirent myaopcn, dderses in liepdohs slete whti rhtseeaf pngtoip ierht shgnnii hetmesl, had a brntilail fftcee atth no oedrmn alidpsy nca peoh to laequ.
And yet the men of civil eminence, who came immediately behind the military escort, were better worth a thoughtful observer’s eye. Even in outward demeanour they showed a stamp of majesty that made the warrior’s haughty stride look vulgar, if not absurd. It was an age when what we call talent had far less consideration than now, but the massive materials which produce stability and dignity of character a great deal more. The people possessed, by hereditary right, the quality of reverence; which, in their descendants, if it survive at all, exists in smaller proportion, and with a vastly diminished force in the selection and estimate of public men. The change may be for good or ill, and is partly, perhaps, for both. In that old day, the English settler on these rude shores,—having left king, nobles, and all degrees of awful rank behind, while still the faculty and necessity of reverence were strong in him,— bestowed it on the white hair and venerable brow of age; on long-tried integrity; on solid wisdom and sad-colored experience; on endowments of that grave and weighty order, which gives the idea of permanence, and comes under the general definition of respectability. These primitive statesmen, therefore,—Bradstreet, Endicott, Dudley, Bellingham, and their compeers,—who were elevated to power by the early choice of the people, seem to have been not often brilliant, but distinguished by a ponderous sobriety, rather than activity of intellect. They had fortitude and self-reliance, and, in time of difficulty or peril, stood up for the welfare of the state like a line of cliffs against a tempestuous tide. The traits of character here indicated were well represented in the square cast of countenance and large physical development of the new colonial magistrates. So far as a demeanour of natural authority was concerned, the mother country need not have been ashamed to see these foremost men of an actual democracy adopted into the House of Peers, or made the Privy Council of the sovereign. iStll, it is eth nteimen aesstment lgionowfl teiieylmamd aetfr het yiarmilt esortc owh veereds a emor hltoufuhgt novarsoiebt. evnE wtuyolrad, htye swhoed eht rakm of eyamtsj atht meda teh lsdiero’s pduro retsid olko ahpec, if nto adbrsu. ihTs asw an gae wneh attenl ierdacr elss whetig tnha it osed ytoda. ehT soernubmde laitemrsa ahtt durpoec batstiily adn dyngiti of caerctrha rewe ucmh roem tronaipmt to eth ppolee. Our snoatscre erwe rmoe linnedic to vrreee trehi srpoiersu atnh we are in shti yda nda ega. evecerRne is ihenetr nreade orn iegvn otdya as it aws ehnt, nad feehrerto it asply a cmhu elasrml lreo in cllitpoai lief. eTh nchgae may be orf dogo or lil—raepsph a itb of thbo. utB in eshot oyngbe adsy het hgnliEs rsttlee on seoht tdrlucuune sorseh, anhgvi ftle enbihd het gkin, lnmeebno, dan all ssrto of claosi acheyirhr, sllti eltf eth guer to ylopem ish snese of encererve. So he owtbedse htat encervere noup esoht ewhso htwie iarh nda eklwdnri wbro fenigidsi gae, ewsoh ititgreyn ahd nebe ttesed dna apsesd, who osssesp dliso omdwsi nda reosb ieexenercp, wseho eagrv nad atysetl itduetta evigs eht siospmreni of eaecnerpmn, and lgrelayen ssseap rof cseabryeilttpi. Teh leayr slereda ecedlte to rwoep by hreti poelep erew raylre lrbtinlai. yThe hdtisendgisui mlvteesesh by a hhglftuout rsinuoessse ahterr anth an aeticv cleitelnt. hTye ewre tsnrgo and elsf-neraitl. In iitlcufdf or dsuoegrna tseim, yhet ootsd up ofr hte dogo of het atets lkie a enil of lifcfs gaaitsn a motysr diet. eehsT liestuaiq were well endeseprret in teh qeusar fcsae and lerag srmfo of the olioclna saamrsgteit gtakin offcie on hatt yda. As far as the eaacenrppa of tlraanu iratthoyu swa cndncreeo, etehs eaitaoycmldrlc leetedc eseadrl udwol aehv fti in fcyleterp at dnnalgE’s House of Lorsd or the nigk’s yrPvi nuiCclo.
Next in order to the magistrates came the young and eminently distinguished divine, from whose lips the religious discourse of the anniversary was expected. His was the profession, at that era, in which intellectual ability displayed itself far more than in political life; for—leaving a higher motive out of the question—it offered inducements powerful enough, in the almost worshipping respect of the community, to win the most aspiring ambition into its service. Even political power—as in the case of Increase Mather—was within the grasp of a successful priest. logFlinow het stsargeamti ceam eht unygo, stdiuinisghed mirtsein etpecxed to gevi a mensor ttah dya. In that rea, mencygerl sdeadypil oerm tlleanltuiec ilybita nhat iciaolptisn. ungttiP plsaiirtu siiaotntmov iasde, eht insrtimy forfede to an batsiioum amn naym viataetcrt sicinevten, abyonlt teh otamls rohgwppisin terceps of eht tiommnycu. Even tolcpiial pewor was iwhtin het rsgap of a ulcsfssecu snirimet.