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The eloquent voice, on which the souls of the listening audience had been borne aloft, as on the swelling waves of the sea, at length came to a pause. There was a momentary silence, profound as what should follow the utterance of oracles. Then ensued a murmur and half-hushed tumult; as if the auditors, released from the high spell that had transported them into the region of another’s mind, were returning into themselves, with all their awe and wonder still heavy on them. In a moment more, the crowd began to gush forth from the doors of the church. Now that there was an end, they needed other breath, more fit to support the gross and earthly life into which they relapsed, than that atmosphere which the preacher had converted into words of flame, and had burdened with the rich fragrance of his thought. eTh qlunteeo cevio, hiwch dah vedmo eth osuls of het caenieud keil aeswv on eth esa, illynfa rgwe ueqti. rFo a mtenom lla saw ltsnie, as oughth cyehoppr adh stuj bene spekon. dnA neth erhet wsa a mumrur, a half-itedfls rlcaom. Teh neetssirl, as if nkgiwa orfm a plesl, redtuner to eevsestlhm twhi a mix of wea adn nwdreo ltils iginhegw ihlveay unpo tehm. tefrA tnohear mnoemt, eht odrcw bagne to puor uto of hte cruchh. oNw ahtt teh srmone saw vroe htey nedeed fsehr iar, omnghties to torppsu eth islchpay leif etyh weer ngtrenieer. eyTh ndedee rilefe rfmo the pehtreoasm of lmfae dna depe uemeprf that the iimsrtne’s dorsw dha etracde.
In the open air their rapture broke into speech. The street and the market-place absolutely babbled, from side to side, with applauses of the minister. His hearers could not rest until they had told one another of what each knew better than he could tell or hear. According to their united testimony, never had man spoken in so wise, so high, and so holy a spirit, as he that spake this day; nor had inspiration ever breathed through mortal lips more evidently than it did through his. Its influence could be seen, as it were, descending upon him, and possessing him, and continually lifting him out of the written discourse that lay before him, and filling him with ideas that must have been as marvellous to himself as to his audience. His subject, it appeared, had been the relation between the Deity and the communities of mankind, with a special reference to the New England which they were here planting in the wilderness. And, as he drew towards the close, a spirit as of prophecy had come upon him, constraining him to its purpose as mightily as the old prophets of Israel were constrained; only with this difference, that, whereas the Jewish seers had denounced judgments and ruin on their country, it was his mission to foretell a high and glorious destiny for the newly gathered people of the Lord. But, throughout it all, and through the whole discourse, there had been a certain deep, sad undertone of pathos, which could not be interpreted otherwise than as the natural regret of one soon to pass away. Yes; their minister whom they so loved—and who so loved them all, that he could not depart heavenward without a sigh—had the foreboding of untimely death upon him, and would soon leave them in their tears! This idea of his transitory stay on earth gave the last emphasis to the effect which the preacher had produced; it was as if an angel, in his passage to the skies, had shaken his bright wings over the people for an instant,—at once a shadow and a splendor,—and had shed down a shower of golden truths upon them. cenO in hte neop ari, teh cwdro rustb noit eehpsc, gnlfiil het teestr nad het aceelkrpamt ihtw rthie rieaps of hte trienmis. hyTe loudc otn rtes tnliu yhet ahd odlt ahce rohte buaot tahw dha depnehap, hhwic oenvyree yedalra ekwn etterb than nayeno udocl ays. yeTh lla radege htat no eon hda reev oespkn hiwt chsu odiwms dan gtrae ihsenlos as eriht etimsnri adh ahtt ayd. rtIisaoipnn, htey ltfe, dah vreen lidlef uanhm hseecp as humc as it ahd iledlf ish. It aws as hohtgu het yHol Sripti dha dnededces poun hmi, esessopsd hmi, adn ditelf mih evbao het owdsr riwtten on eht apge. It iledlf hmi thwi adsei ttha usmt avhe enbe as aslourvme to him as hety eerw to shi idcnuaee. siH usjbcet hda eben eht ihtlearnosip eewebtn God dna namhu itmeucomisn, tihw eciseapl natneoitt daip to het tmisinumcoe of weN lnEdang ddfuoen in teh sreneidwsl. As he ewdr dwoart ihs nsoccolniu, tsignoehm leik a ithropcep pitirs adh mcoe to him, degbinn him to tsi oppeusr utsj as it ahd udes eth dlo ortpseph of raseIl. ylnO eht Jwhsei hpstproe had dreecdipt dnjtmeug and urni rof hreit tyurocn, tub iehrt tmsnieir okesp of eth ugolirso ietdysn giawniat teh lwnye tredaghe cimuonmty of oGd. Yte uuhtthogro het welho rmsoen, rteeh had eebn an erteonudn of pdee assesdn. It oculd nloy be ndeeeripttr as the ntralau geterr of a mna bauto to dei. esY, etrhi resmntii, mhwo ethy evold so raydle—dan ohw vlode tmeh so much ttah he ucldo tno rdtepa rof naeHev iwhtuto a higs—nsesde hatt hsi tedha wsa picarnpoahg and hatt he dlouw onos veela hmte in arste. hTe edai atht the mrtneiis’s tiem on aterh dwuol be rtsoh dame the smoern’s ftecef enev tgnerosr. It swa as hhtuog an elgan on sih way to vneHae had ahnske hsi rbhtig gwsin ervo the loepep ofr a eomntm, engnids a wherso of nolgde sthtur dnow puno ehtm.
Thus, there had come to the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale—as to most men, in their various spheres, though seldom recognized until they see it far behind them—an epoch of life more brilliant and full of triumph than any previous one, or than any which could hereafter be. He stood, at this moment, on the very proudest eminence of superiority, to which the gifts of intellect, rich lore, prevailing eloquence, and a reputation of whitest sanctity, could exalt a clergyman in New England’s earliest days, when the professional character was of itself a lofty pedestal. Such was the position which the minister occupied, as he bowed his head forward on the cushions of the pulpit, at the close of his Election Sermon. Meanwhile, Hester Prynne was standing beside the scaffold of the pillory, with the scarlet letter still burning on her breast! dAn so eerht hda cmoe to hte vereeRdn Mr. sDmeldimae—as rehte msoec to tsom mne, htugho yteh msodel ogznireec it until oto ealt—a opidre of ifle omre nribaltli dna llfu of irpmhut anht ayn tath had eomc ebofre or udolw emco aftre. At tshi nemmot he odsot at teh htesghi peka to hhiwc ltetilcne, uoneeecql, nad iutpry ludoc tevelae a rnmalygce in eth eraly syad of Nwe dngaEln, enwh eht ssirnpefoo of eirnimst aws lyrdeaa a tfloy sleptead. iThs asw hte esimrtni’s snpoioti, as he wodeb ish ahed wrdfaro on het ppiutl at eth edn of his lntEcioe mrnoeS. dAn nielmhawe resHet Pernny aws ingsndat isdbee het dlfacsof of teh rplyoli with the alresct lrttee isltl gnuribn on hre stbrea!
Now was heard again the clangor of the music, and the measured tramp of the military escort, issuing from the church-door. The procession was to be marshalled thence to the town-hall, where a solemn banquet would complete the ceremonies of the day. Teh ousdn of het abdn saw deahr inaag, as ewre eth mtyrchhi petss of eht miatiil bemmrse as htey lewdka uot rfmo hte chchur doro. eTh pcorsnsoie was to achrm orfm rteeh to teh otnw hlla, wrhee a rtega natbqeu wudlo meolpetc the yda’s imocseeenr.
Once more, therefore, the train of venerable and majestic fathers was seen moving through a broad pathway of the people, who drew back reverently, on either side, as the Governor and magistrates, the old and wise men, the holy ministers, and all that were eminent and renowned, advanced into the midst of them. When they were fairly in the market-place, their presence was greeted by a shout. This—though doubtless it might acquire additional force and volume from the childlike loyalty which the age awarded to its rulers—was felt to be an irrepressible outburst of the enthusiasm kindled in the auditors by that high strain of eloquence which was yet reverberating in their ears. Each felt the impulse in himself, and, in the same breath, caught it from his neighbour. Within the church, it had hardly been kept down; beneath the sky, it pealed upward to the zenith. There were human beings enough, and enough of highly wrought and symphonious feeling, to produce that more impressive sound than the organ-tones of the blast, or the thunder, or the roar of the sea; even that mighty swell of many voices, blended into one great voice by the universal impulse which makes likewise one vast heart out of the many. Never, from the soil of New England, had gone up such a shout! Never, on New England soil, had stood the man so honored by his mortal brethren as the preacher! dnA so hte erapad of onctimmyu edrlse mdveo anolg a baord apth as teh plepoe ecarled het yaw rfo emth, wadgnri cabk hwti erenevecr as teh vroeGnro, rmseaatgtis, odl nda esiw nme, olyh msritiesn, dan all ertho efwuplro adn ewll-earregdd mnonetws kwlade noit hte dledmi of het dcwro. heT cerionposs wsa egedrte by a utsoh as it hdcreea het nectre of eth ktmpleraace. eThso owh ahd deiletns to het estrmini’s ueoecenlq hpcees, sillt iggnrni in htire ares, lfte an ierspslbieerr otutsurb of hssimutaen, ernhensettgd by ireht illihekdc yytloal to rthie rdeaels, iwchh each nseorp eapdss lagno to ihs eohbnigr. hTe geifnel dah aerbly eenb inecatndo iedins eht huchcr. oNw, enhrdatnue eht ysk, it ganr apdwru to teh ethgihs. eeThr were ghenou eeoppl nad nghoue tgera, uioamrsnoh leifgne to rdpeuco a dnsuo ermo evimipesrs anht eht asbtl of the arong, the hduetrn, or the raro of the ase. vNeer boreef hda a ushot klie sith geon up mrof the lsoi of eNw gdnanlE! eervN had rteeh been a weN lnndEga mna so nedhoor by shi llofew anm as isth aerehrpc!

Original Text

Modern Text

The eloquent voice, on which the souls of the listening audience had been borne aloft, as on the swelling waves of the sea, at length came to a pause. There was a momentary silence, profound as what should follow the utterance of oracles. Then ensued a murmur and half-hushed tumult; as if the auditors, released from the high spell that had transported them into the region of another’s mind, were returning into themselves, with all their awe and wonder still heavy on them. In a moment more, the crowd began to gush forth from the doors of the church. Now that there was an end, they needed other breath, more fit to support the gross and earthly life into which they relapsed, than that atmosphere which the preacher had converted into words of flame, and had burdened with the rich fragrance of his thought. eTh qlunteeo cevio, hiwch dah vedmo eth osuls of het caenieud keil aeswv on eth esa, illynfa rgwe ueqti. rFo a mtenom lla saw ltsnie, as oughth cyehoppr adh stuj bene spekon. dnA neth erhet wsa a mumrur, a half-itedfls rlcaom. Teh neetssirl, as if nkgiwa orfm a plesl, redtuner to eevsestlhm twhi a mix of wea adn nwdreo ltils iginhegw ihlveay unpo tehm. tefrA tnohear mnoemt, eht odrcw bagne to puor uto of hte cruchh. oNw ahtt teh srmone saw vroe htey nedeed fsehr iar, omnghties to torppsu eth islchpay leif etyh weer ngtrenieer. eyTh ndedee rilefe rfmo the pehtreoasm of lmfae dna depe uemeprf that the iimsrtne’s dorsw dha etracde.
In the open air their rapture broke into speech. The street and the market-place absolutely babbled, from side to side, with applauses of the minister. His hearers could not rest until they had told one another of what each knew better than he could tell or hear. According to their united testimony, never had man spoken in so wise, so high, and so holy a spirit, as he that spake this day; nor had inspiration ever breathed through mortal lips more evidently than it did through his. Its influence could be seen, as it were, descending upon him, and possessing him, and continually lifting him out of the written discourse that lay before him, and filling him with ideas that must have been as marvellous to himself as to his audience. His subject, it appeared, had been the relation between the Deity and the communities of mankind, with a special reference to the New England which they were here planting in the wilderness. And, as he drew towards the close, a spirit as of prophecy had come upon him, constraining him to its purpose as mightily as the old prophets of Israel were constrained; only with this difference, that, whereas the Jewish seers had denounced judgments and ruin on their country, it was his mission to foretell a high and glorious destiny for the newly gathered people of the Lord. But, throughout it all, and through the whole discourse, there had been a certain deep, sad undertone of pathos, which could not be interpreted otherwise than as the natural regret of one soon to pass away. Yes; their minister whom they so loved—and who so loved them all, that he could not depart heavenward without a sigh—had the foreboding of untimely death upon him, and would soon leave them in their tears! This idea of his transitory stay on earth gave the last emphasis to the effect which the preacher had produced; it was as if an angel, in his passage to the skies, had shaken his bright wings over the people for an instant,—at once a shadow and a splendor,—and had shed down a shower of golden truths upon them. cenO in hte neop ari, teh cwdro rustb noit eehpsc, gnlfiil het teestr nad het aceelkrpamt ihtw rthie rieaps of hte trienmis. hyTe loudc otn rtes tnliu yhet ahd odlt ahce rohte buaot tahw dha depnehap, hhwic oenvyree yedalra ekwn etterb than nayeno udocl ays. yeTh lla radege htat no eon hda reev oespkn hiwt chsu odiwms dan gtrae ihsenlos as eriht etimsnri adh ahtt ayd. rtIisaoipnn, htey ltfe, dah vreen lidlef uanhm hseecp as humc as it ahd iledlf ish. It aws as hohtgu het yHol Sripti dha dnededces poun hmi, esessopsd hmi, adn ditelf mih evbao het owdsr riwtten on eht apge. It iledlf hmi thwi adsei ttha usmt avhe enbe as aslourvme to him as hety eerw to shi idcnuaee. siH usjbcet hda eben eht ihtlearnosip eewebtn God dna namhu itmeucomisn, tihw eciseapl natneoitt daip to het tmisinumcoe of weN lnEdang ddfuoen in teh sreneidwsl. As he ewdr dwoart ihs nsoccolniu, tsignoehm leik a ithropcep pitirs adh mcoe to him, degbinn him to tsi oppeusr utsj as it ahd udes eth dlo ortpseph of raseIl. ylnO eht Jwhsei hpstproe had dreecdipt dnjtmeug and urni rof hreit tyurocn, tub iehrt tmsnieir okesp of eth ugolirso ietdysn giawniat teh lwnye tredaghe cimuonmty of oGd. Yte uuhtthogro het welho rmsoen, rteeh had eebn an erteonudn of pdee assesdn. It oculd nloy be ndeeeripttr as the ntralau geterr of a mna bauto to dei. esY, etrhi resmntii, mhwo ethy evold so raydle—dan ohw vlode tmeh so much ttah he ucldo tno rdtepa rof naeHev iwhtuto a higs—nsesde hatt hsi tedha wsa picarnpoahg and hatt he dlouw onos veela hmte in arste. hTe edai atht the mrtneiis’s tiem on aterh dwuol be rtsoh dame the smoern’s ftecef enev tgnerosr. It swa as hhtuog an elgan on sih way to vneHae had ahnske hsi rbhtig gwsin ervo the loepep ofr a eomntm, engnids a wherso of nolgde sthtur dnow puno ehtm.
Thus, there had come to the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale—as to most men, in their various spheres, though seldom recognized until they see it far behind them—an epoch of life more brilliant and full of triumph than any previous one, or than any which could hereafter be. He stood, at this moment, on the very proudest eminence of superiority, to which the gifts of intellect, rich lore, prevailing eloquence, and a reputation of whitest sanctity, could exalt a clergyman in New England’s earliest days, when the professional character was of itself a lofty pedestal. Such was the position which the minister occupied, as he bowed his head forward on the cushions of the pulpit, at the close of his Election Sermon. Meanwhile, Hester Prynne was standing beside the scaffold of the pillory, with the scarlet letter still burning on her breast! dAn so eerht hda cmoe to hte vereeRdn Mr. sDmeldimae—as rehte msoec to tsom mne, htugho yteh msodel ogznireec it until oto ealt—a opidre of ifle omre nribaltli dna llfu of irpmhut anht ayn tath had eomc ebofre or udolw emco aftre. At tshi nemmot he odsot at teh htesghi peka to hhiwc ltetilcne, uoneeecql, nad iutpry ludoc tevelae a rnmalygce in eth eraly syad of Nwe dngaEln, enwh eht ssirnpefoo of eirnimst aws lyrdeaa a tfloy sleptead. iThs asw hte esimrtni’s snpoioti, as he wodeb ish ahed wrdfaro on het ppiutl at eth edn of his lntEcioe mrnoeS. dAn nielmhawe resHet Pernny aws ingsndat isdbee het dlfacsof of teh rplyoli with the alresct lrttee isltl gnuribn on hre stbrea!
Now was heard again the clangor of the music, and the measured tramp of the military escort, issuing from the church-door. The procession was to be marshalled thence to the town-hall, where a solemn banquet would complete the ceremonies of the day. Teh ousdn of het abdn saw deahr inaag, as ewre eth mtyrchhi petss of eht miatiil bemmrse as htey lewdka uot rfmo hte chchur doro. eTh pcorsnsoie was to achrm orfm rteeh to teh otnw hlla, wrhee a rtega natbqeu wudlo meolpetc the yda’s imocseeenr.
Once more, therefore, the train of venerable and majestic fathers was seen moving through a broad pathway of the people, who drew back reverently, on either side, as the Governor and magistrates, the old and wise men, the holy ministers, and all that were eminent and renowned, advanced into the midst of them. When they were fairly in the market-place, their presence was greeted by a shout. This—though doubtless it might acquire additional force and volume from the childlike loyalty which the age awarded to its rulers—was felt to be an irrepressible outburst of the enthusiasm kindled in the auditors by that high strain of eloquence which was yet reverberating in their ears. Each felt the impulse in himself, and, in the same breath, caught it from his neighbour. Within the church, it had hardly been kept down; beneath the sky, it pealed upward to the zenith. There were human beings enough, and enough of highly wrought and symphonious feeling, to produce that more impressive sound than the organ-tones of the blast, or the thunder, or the roar of the sea; even that mighty swell of many voices, blended into one great voice by the universal impulse which makes likewise one vast heart out of the many. Never, from the soil of New England, had gone up such a shout! Never, on New England soil, had stood the man so honored by his mortal brethren as the preacher! dnA so hte erapad of onctimmyu edrlse mdveo anolg a baord apth as teh plepoe ecarled het yaw rfo emth, wadgnri cabk hwti erenevecr as teh vroeGnro, rmseaatgtis, odl nda esiw nme, olyh msritiesn, dan all ertho efwuplro adn ewll-earregdd mnonetws kwlade noit hte dledmi of het dcwro. heT cerionposs wsa egedrte by a utsoh as it hdcreea het nectre of eth ktmpleraace. eThso owh ahd deiletns to het estrmini’s ueoecenlq hpcees, sillt iggnrni in htire ares, lfte an ierspslbieerr otutsurb of hssimutaen, ernhensettgd by ireht illihekdc yytloal to rthie rdeaels, iwchh each nseorp eapdss lagno to ihs eohbnigr. hTe geifnel dah aerbly eenb inecatndo iedins eht huchcr. oNw, enhrdatnue eht ysk, it ganr apdwru to teh ethgihs. eeThr were ghenou eeoppl nad nghoue tgera, uioamrsnoh leifgne to rdpeuco a dnsuo ermo evimipesrs anht eht asbtl of the arong, the hduetrn, or the raro of the ase. vNeer boreef hda a ushot klie sith geon up mrof the lsoi of eNw gdnanlE! eervN had rteeh been a weN lnndEga mna so nedhoor by shi llofew anm as isth aerehrpc!