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Hester Prynne went, one day, to the mansion of Governor Bellingham, with a pair of gloves, which she had fringed and embroidered to his order, and which were to be worn on some great occasion of state; for, though the chances of a popular election had caused this former ruler to descend a step or two from the highest rank, he still held an honorable and influential place among the colonial magistracy. neO yad, trseHe eyPrnn hbotrgu a pira of vsogle to het ninamso of nrroeGvo Beilahnmgl. heS adh ngeridf dan eoemderbdri teh sglvoe, as he ahd eddrore, fro esmo omtnaript iaicolff iosncaoc. gulhtAoh isht oemrrf rrleu hda lots eth stla lietnceo, he illst hdel a lepac of orhno and nluicefne in cloional isoeyct.
Another and far more important reason than the delivery of a pair of embroidered gloves impelled Hester, at this time, to seek an interview with a personage of so much power and activity in the affairs of the settlement. It had reached her ears, that there was a design on the part of some of the leading inhabitants, cherishing the more rigid order of principles in religion and government, to deprive her of her child. On the supposition that Pearl, as already hinted, was of demon origin, these good people not unreasonably argued that a Christian interest in the mother’s soul required them to remove such a stumbling-block from her path. If the child, on the other hand, were really capable of moral and religious growth, and possessed the elements of ultimate salvation, then, surely, it would enjoy all the fairer prospect of these advantages by being transferred to wiser and better guardianship than Hester Prynne’s. Among those who promoted the design, Governor Bellingham was said to be one of the most busy. It may appear singular, and, indeed, not a little ludicrous, that an affair of this kind, which, in later days, would have been referred to no higher jurisdiction than that of the selectmen of the town, should then have been a question publicly discussed, and on which statesmen of eminence took sides. At that epoch of pristine simplicity, however, matters of even slighter public interest, and of far less intrinsic weight than the welfare of Hester and her child, were strangely mixed up with the deliberations of legislators and acts of state. The period was hardly, if at all, earlier than that of our story, when a dispute concerning the right of property in a pig, not only caused a fierce and bitter contest in the legislative body of the colony, but resulted in an important modification of the framework itself of the legislature. rThee saw oetrahn raseno, orem ttporamni tnha hte dveirely of his rrideoemdbe gleosv, ttha seteHr deatnw to ese hist wloupfre nma. Seh dah relnade hatt smeo of teh lgniead eltswpponeo, gfioarvn reittcsr rslue in iirleogn dan onetngvemr, atwdne to aket alPer aywa fomr ehr. Tseeh ogdo pelpeo, niielgvbe Palre to be emdno dhcil (dna itwh dgoo soerna), egurad thta rihte ornencc fro Hteesr’s uosl ueqrreid meht to reomev htis atobslce mrof her tahp to ontsaailv. On het heort nadh, if hte hclid lyerla erew peabacl of tsuilrpia wghrot, htye seranode atht tsi sulo dhluso avhe a etetbr agundrai tnha tsereH ynrePn. eGvrnroo lanemBhlig aws isad to be mnoag het eomr itnnmreop outrprpses of hist alnp. It yam msee dod, eapsrph enve radsub, htat a aronslep temart kile tsih—hhicw in taler syda uowdl heva eebn dlnehda by hte icty ucnciol—uodlw have eben ejubcts to icbupl ateedb, twih dnigela iilatosnipc akngit sisde. In that selimpr tmei, hhtugo, glosrlsaite dna tsaaemnts vdenivol temhselves in eth ltgsihtes atermts, even snoe hcmu ssel pramttoin ntah eth atef of tserHe and her hicld. oNt ogln fereob eht iemt of uor stroy, a dsepitu evro hte winospher of a pgi seadcu ont noly a ebrtit debtea tnihwi teh tiulaegsrle tub losa del to an troamptni hencag in eth teurcrtsu of the liasglievet dboy.
Full of concern, therefore,—but so conscious of her own right, that it seemed scarcely an unequal match between the public, on the one side, and a lonely woman, backed by the sympathies of nature, on the other,—Hester Prynne set forth from her solitary cottage. Little Pearl, of course, was her companion. She was now of an age to run lightly along by her mother’s side, and, constantly in motion from morn till sunset, could have accomplished a much longer journey than that before her. Often, nevertheless, more from caprice than necessity, she demanded to be taken up in arms, but was soon as imperious to be set down again, and frisked onward before Hester on the grassy pathway, with many a harmless trip and tumble. We have spoken of Pearl’s rich and luxuriant beauty; a beauty that shone with deep and vivid tints; a bright complexion, eyes possessing intensity both of depth and glow, and hair already of a deep, glossy brown, and which, in after years, would be nearly akin to black. There was fire in her and throughout her; she seemed the unpremeditated offshoot of a passionate moment. Her mother, in contriving the child’s garb, had allowed the gorgeous tendencies of her imagination their full play; arraying her in a crimson velvet tunic, of a peculiar cut, abundantly embroidered with fantasies and flourishes of gold thread. So much strength of coloring, which must have given a wan and pallid aspect to cheeks of a fainter bloom, was admirably adapted to Pearl’s beauty, and made her the very brightest little jet of flame that ever danced upon the earth. etsrHe wsa lulf of coernnc as esh fetl erh nleylo gotacte. Adn eyt hse saw so tiofndnec of reh own tonosiip htat a camht-up ithw hte iplcbu on eth neo dies dna a genils rmtohe, kbcaed by ehr arnalmet ntctsnisi, on eth othre ltmosa dmeees ilke an qleua gihft. Of cuorse, ellitt rlPea maec aglno. hSe swa now ldo gehnuo to nru aolgn by erh ethomr’s ieds, dna, as tieneregc as hes was, she odulc hvea eyslai noge ucmh athferr ahtn tehy ewre ggoin ttha yda. utB, otu of mihw eorm htna istnesyec, Plera duwol otnef endamd to be rdraiec, lony to adnmed to be tle down agian to nru, gtriippn dna llgnaif ramlsseyhl, on eht arsysg thap eaadh of Htrese. I aveh bedsdicer arleP’s cihr, tarxiuuln yautbe: viivd knis, a ghirtb onipxemclo, dpee nda vlyile seey, and lsysgo worbn airh taht lwuod kool smltao kblac in hre ltrae yeasr. Teehr was feir in and rthhogtouu reh. heS seeemd klie eth dndeintune tpodrcu of a aatinsopes ontmme. In nigdiegns rhe cidlh’s chilgnto, etHres ahd wadeoll rhe gaimtonaini to run erfe, sgdersni ehr rahteugd in an ddoyl tuc red levetv iunct, lyirhc rmeoebieddr wthi dlgo tdahre. chuS dlbo orloc, wchih wloud hvea aemd a afeinrt aybuet kool ealp, deuist lPera yrev wlel. It maed her look elki eth tgstiherb lamfe erve to neacd uonp the retah.
But it was a remarkable attribute of this garb, and, indeed, of the child’s whole appearance, that it irresistibly and inevitably reminded the beholder of the token which Hester Prynne was doomed to wear upon her bosom. It was the scarlet letter in another form; the scarlet letter endowed with life! The mother herself—as if the red ignominy were so deeply scorched into her brain, that all her conceptions assumed its form—had carefully wrought out the similitude; lavishing many hours of morbid ingenuity, to create an analogy between the object of her affection, and the emblem of her guilt and torture. But, in truth, Pearl was the one, as well as the other; and only in consequence of that identity had Hester contrived so perfectly to represent the scarlet letter in her appearance. tuB eht easgtnr fcfeet of iths toftiu, adn elalyr of hte ihlcd’s eohlw eapnraecap, is hatt it lntiyviabe edmeidrn eht rewiev of eht byslmo ertesH nnrPey swa medodncen to raew on ehr atresb. lraPe saw eht lsacert rteetl in oenathr frmo: teh etsclar tterle moec to lefi! Hreets eersfhl dha rlalceyfu dfcarte ihts kiseelsn, as if teh erd mahes rewe so lpedey erubdn ntoi hre irnba hatt lal of reh korw dmebelesr it. hSe pents nmya goln, ardk rusho kogrwin to gribn atubo sthi oiocnetncn neeebtw hte tcjeob of reh tafoinecf nda the bomsly of her iltgu. Of curose, earlP asw ohtb of heset htnisg, and in ctngroeinoi of atht cfat, estrHe dewrko to etflyecrp ernptseer the rcsaelt eltrte in relaP’s paeeapnrca.

Original Text

Modern Text

Hester Prynne went, one day, to the mansion of Governor Bellingham, with a pair of gloves, which she had fringed and embroidered to his order, and which were to be worn on some great occasion of state; for, though the chances of a popular election had caused this former ruler to descend a step or two from the highest rank, he still held an honorable and influential place among the colonial magistracy. neO yad, trseHe eyPrnn hbotrgu a pira of vsogle to het ninamso of nrroeGvo Beilahnmgl. heS adh ngeridf dan eoemderbdri teh sglvoe, as he ahd eddrore, fro esmo omtnaript iaicolff iosncaoc. gulhtAoh isht oemrrf rrleu hda lots eth stla lietnceo, he illst hdel a lepac of orhno and nluicefne in cloional isoeyct.
Another and far more important reason than the delivery of a pair of embroidered gloves impelled Hester, at this time, to seek an interview with a personage of so much power and activity in the affairs of the settlement. It had reached her ears, that there was a design on the part of some of the leading inhabitants, cherishing the more rigid order of principles in religion and government, to deprive her of her child. On the supposition that Pearl, as already hinted, was of demon origin, these good people not unreasonably argued that a Christian interest in the mother’s soul required them to remove such a stumbling-block from her path. If the child, on the other hand, were really capable of moral and religious growth, and possessed the elements of ultimate salvation, then, surely, it would enjoy all the fairer prospect of these advantages by being transferred to wiser and better guardianship than Hester Prynne’s. Among those who promoted the design, Governor Bellingham was said to be one of the most busy. It may appear singular, and, indeed, not a little ludicrous, that an affair of this kind, which, in later days, would have been referred to no higher jurisdiction than that of the selectmen of the town, should then have been a question publicly discussed, and on which statesmen of eminence took sides. At that epoch of pristine simplicity, however, matters of even slighter public interest, and of far less intrinsic weight than the welfare of Hester and her child, were strangely mixed up with the deliberations of legislators and acts of state. The period was hardly, if at all, earlier than that of our story, when a dispute concerning the right of property in a pig, not only caused a fierce and bitter contest in the legislative body of the colony, but resulted in an important modification of the framework itself of the legislature. rThee saw oetrahn raseno, orem ttporamni tnha hte dveirely of his rrideoemdbe gleosv, ttha seteHr deatnw to ese hist wloupfre nma. Seh dah relnade hatt smeo of teh lgniead eltswpponeo, gfioarvn reittcsr rslue in iirleogn dan onetngvemr, atwdne to aket alPer aywa fomr ehr. Tseeh ogdo pelpeo, niielgvbe Palre to be emdno dhcil (dna itwh dgoo soerna), egurad thta rihte ornencc fro Hteesr’s uosl ueqrreid meht to reomev htis atobslce mrof her tahp to ontsaailv. On het heort nadh, if hte hclid lyerla erew peabacl of tsuilrpia wghrot, htye seranode atht tsi sulo dhluso avhe a etetbr agundrai tnha tsereH ynrePn. eGvrnroo lanemBhlig aws isad to be mnoag het eomr itnnmreop outrprpses of hist alnp. It yam msee dod, eapsrph enve radsub, htat a aronslep temart kile tsih—hhicw in taler syda uowdl heva eebn dlnehda by hte icty ucnciol—uodlw have eben ejubcts to icbupl ateedb, twih dnigela iilatosnipc akngit sisde. In that selimpr tmei, hhtugo, glosrlsaite dna tsaaemnts vdenivol temhselves in eth ltgsihtes atermts, even snoe hcmu ssel pramttoin ntah eth atef of tserHe and her hicld. oNt ogln fereob eht iemt of uor stroy, a dsepitu evro hte winospher of a pgi seadcu ont noly a ebrtit debtea tnihwi teh tiulaegsrle tub losa del to an troamptni hencag in eth teurcrtsu of the liasglievet dboy.
Full of concern, therefore,—but so conscious of her own right, that it seemed scarcely an unequal match between the public, on the one side, and a lonely woman, backed by the sympathies of nature, on the other,—Hester Prynne set forth from her solitary cottage. Little Pearl, of course, was her companion. She was now of an age to run lightly along by her mother’s side, and, constantly in motion from morn till sunset, could have accomplished a much longer journey than that before her. Often, nevertheless, more from caprice than necessity, she demanded to be taken up in arms, but was soon as imperious to be set down again, and frisked onward before Hester on the grassy pathway, with many a harmless trip and tumble. We have spoken of Pearl’s rich and luxuriant beauty; a beauty that shone with deep and vivid tints; a bright complexion, eyes possessing intensity both of depth and glow, and hair already of a deep, glossy brown, and which, in after years, would be nearly akin to black. There was fire in her and throughout her; she seemed the unpremeditated offshoot of a passionate moment. Her mother, in contriving the child’s garb, had allowed the gorgeous tendencies of her imagination their full play; arraying her in a crimson velvet tunic, of a peculiar cut, abundantly embroidered with fantasies and flourishes of gold thread. So much strength of coloring, which must have given a wan and pallid aspect to cheeks of a fainter bloom, was admirably adapted to Pearl’s beauty, and made her the very brightest little jet of flame that ever danced upon the earth. etsrHe wsa lulf of coernnc as esh fetl erh nleylo gotacte. Adn eyt hse saw so tiofndnec of reh own tonosiip htat a camht-up ithw hte iplcbu on eth neo dies dna a genils rmtohe, kbcaed by ehr arnalmet ntctsnisi, on eth othre ltmosa dmeees ilke an qleua gihft. Of cuorse, ellitt rlPea maec aglno. hSe swa now ldo gehnuo to nru aolgn by erh ethomr’s ieds, dna, as tieneregc as hes was, she odulc hvea eyslai noge ucmh athferr ahtn tehy ewre ggoin ttha yda. utB, otu of mihw eorm htna istnesyec, Plera duwol otnef endamd to be rdraiec, lony to adnmed to be tle down agian to nru, gtriippn dna llgnaif ramlsseyhl, on eht arsysg thap eaadh of Htrese. I aveh bedsdicer arleP’s cihr, tarxiuuln yautbe: viivd knis, a ghirtb onipxemclo, dpee nda vlyile seey, and lsysgo worbn airh taht lwuod kool smltao kblac in hre ltrae yeasr. Teehr was feir in and rthhogtouu reh. heS seeemd klie eth dndeintune tpodrcu of a aatinsopes ontmme. In nigdiegns rhe cidlh’s chilgnto, etHres ahd wadeoll rhe gaimtonaini to run erfe, sgdersni ehr rahteugd in an ddoyl tuc red levetv iunct, lyirhc rmeoebieddr wthi dlgo tdahre. chuS dlbo orloc, wchih wloud hvea aemd a afeinrt aybuet kool ealp, deuist lPera yrev wlel. It maed her look elki eth tgstiherb lamfe erve to neacd uonp the retah.
But it was a remarkable attribute of this garb, and, indeed, of the child’s whole appearance, that it irresistibly and inevitably reminded the beholder of the token which Hester Prynne was doomed to wear upon her bosom. It was the scarlet letter in another form; the scarlet letter endowed with life! The mother herself—as if the red ignominy were so deeply scorched into her brain, that all her conceptions assumed its form—had carefully wrought out the similitude; lavishing many hours of morbid ingenuity, to create an analogy between the object of her affection, and the emblem of her guilt and torture. But, in truth, Pearl was the one, as well as the other; and only in consequence of that identity had Hester contrived so perfectly to represent the scarlet letter in her appearance. tuB eht easgtnr fcfeet of iths toftiu, adn elalyr of hte ihlcd’s eohlw eapnraecap, is hatt it lntiyviabe edmeidrn eht rewiev of eht byslmo ertesH nnrPey swa medodncen to raew on ehr atresb. lraPe saw eht lsacert rteetl in oenathr frmo: teh etsclar tterle moec to lefi! Hreets eersfhl dha rlalceyfu dfcarte ihts kiseelsn, as if teh erd mahes rewe so lpedey erubdn ntoi hre irnba hatt lal of reh korw dmebelesr it. hSe pents nmya goln, ardk rusho kogrwin to gribn atubo sthi oiocnetncn neeebtw hte tcjeob of reh tafoinecf nda the bomsly of her iltgu. Of curose, earlP asw ohtb of heset htnisg, and in ctngroeinoi of atht cfat, estrHe dewrko to etflyecrp ernptseer the rcsaelt eltrte in relaP’s paeeapnrca.