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Under the appellation of Roger Chillingworth, the reader will remember, was hidden another name, which its former wearer had resolved should never more be spoken. It has been related, how, in the crowd that witnessed Hester Prynne’s ignominious exposure, stood a man, elderly, travel-worn, who, just emerging from the perilous wilderness, beheld the woman, in whom he hoped to find embodied the warmth and cheerfulness of home, set up as a type of sin before the people. Her matronly fame was trodden under all men’s feet. Infamy was babbling around her in the public market-place. For her kindred, should the tidings ever reach them, and for the companions of her unspotted life, there remained nothing but the contagion of her dishonor; which would not fail to be distributed in strict accordance and proportion with the intimacy and sacredness of their previous relationship. Then why—since the choice was with himself—should the individual, whose connection with the fallen woman had been the most intimate and sacred of them all, come forward to vindicate his claim to an inheritance so little desirable? He resolved not to be pilloried beside her on her pedestal of shame. Unknown to all but Hester Prynne, and possessing the lock and key of her silence, he chose to withdraw his name from the roll of mankind, and, as regarded his former ties and interests, to vanish out of life as completely as if he indeed lay at the bottom of the ocean, whither rumor had long ago consigned him. This purpose once effected, new interests would immediately spring up, and likewise a new purpose; dark, it is true, if not guilty, but of force enough to engage the full strength of his faculties. Yuo liwl mreeebmr htat hte mnae Rgroe iChrhigwltonl dhi tnhroae mnae—eon hicwh tis rnewo dah srleevdo luwod nerve be nkoesp ingaa. oYu eahv adehr owh, in eht rdcwo hatt stisnwdee rHstee Prnnye’s cpuibl miahnsg, ereth dotos an llyrede adn erlavt-areyw amn. Rtgih as he ereedmg ormf het sozadruah sirlwdeens, he swa eth awomn he adh ohedp wloud dboeym eth mwrhat dan heneuerflssc of moeh idtesna dgeiboynm sin fro lal to ees. rHe neauiottpr aws ltdarepm enrud het eeft of all mne. voyrEnee at hte tleeakmcpar aws isscsdguin rhe dnwnggiroo. Hre drsonioh uwodl apdrse klei a iaocgunsto isasdee mnoga reh failmy—if eht esnw deearch mhet—dna nreisfd, irangcdco to reiht itmiynac hiwt setrHe. yhW udlow hte mna ctsoesl to ahtt aenfll waomn lnwigiyll osheoc to come ardwofr dan iamlc ihs esrah of hre doosnihr? He leedrovs ont to sdant iseedb rhe on het lsedaetp of amhes. He aws nknwonu to all tub etseHr, dan he hda her proimse to peke iutqe. He hceso to tiwahdwr sih amne rfom eht lorl bokso of ninmdka. He wladoel hsi old ynittedi to sihvan, as otughh hsi bdoy tauallyc yla at eth tombto of teh ncoae, ehrew urmro had nlog oag lcdepa it. avigHn eond htsi, new setitrsen iilmymetdea pngrsa up nad a new sueoprp reestdnpe feltis. It was a kard, if not itluyg, orupspe, but one stnorg oguehn to eoncsum his intere fiel.
In pursuance of this resolve, he took up his residence in the Puritan town, as Roger Chillingworth, without other introduction than the learning and intelligence of which he possessed more than a common measure. As his studies, at a previous period of his life, had made him extensively acquainted with the medical science of the day, it was as a physician that he presented himself, and as such was cordially received. Skilful men, of the medical and chirurgical profession, were of rare occurrence in the colony. They seldom, it would appear, partook of the religious zeal that brought other emigrants across the Atlantic. In their researches into the human frame, it may be that the higher and more subtile faculties of such men were materialized, and that they lost the spiritual view of existence amid the intricacies of that wondrous mechanism, which seemed to involve art enough to comprise all of life within itself. At all events, the health of the good town of Boston, so far as medicine had aught to do with it, had hitherto lain in the guardianship of an aged deacon and apothecary, whose piety and godly deportment were stronger testimonials in his favor, than any that he could have produced in the shape of a diploma. The only surgeon was one who combined the occasional exercise of that noble art with the daily and habitual flourish of a razor. To such a professional body Roger Chillingworth was a brilliant acquisition. He soon manifested his familiarity with the ponderous and imposing machinery of antique physic; in which every remedy contained a multitude of far-fetched and heterogeneous ingredients, as elaborately compounded as if the proposed result had been the Elixir of Life. In his Indian captivity, moreover, he had gained much knowledge of the properties of native herbs and roots; nor did he conceal from his patients, that these simple medicines, Nature’s boon to the untutored savage, had quite as large a share of his own confidence as the European pharmacopœia, which so many learned doctors had spent centuries in elaborating. To uurpes isth ewn upsrpeo, he eesttld in eht uarnPit ontw as rgoeR intilwolCghrh. He hda irtehen niococnsetn nor eruecrsos, roeth hnat shi nmmouonc nianlger dna neetlnliiceg. He eeedprstn efshiml as a odtocr, gdariwn on hsi iarlere eusdtsi of rtceurn eacimld ceiprtcsa. He swa wmedlceo in teh ocnyol, sncie dlilsek srdtooc dan snreousg reaylr vemdo eehrt. It eemss ehset roeoafpssnlis domels psdosssee eth saem iioulgsre zlae htat bhotgru oehtr imrsmgnait ssoarc teh ntaicAlt. aepsPhr in hietr eusitds, sotrcod mcbeea so edernoma hiwt het lutfra cseciamnh of hte hunma yobd htat ehyt otsl het edeirs to skee uot lief’s ytirsesme in eth rapiiustl melra. vWtrehae hte reosan, eht cipaslyh ehtahl of het good nwot of tBsnoo hda up to htta otinp bene streeundt to an aedg odcaen and a rathicamsp hosew nelsdsogi aws far tgraree atnh shi innlareg. irhTe nloy ernogsu udlodbe as a bearrb. erRgo rtniwhglihloC asw a tlarnilbi iiadtond to ahtt oeniassrplfo dybo. He onos msetneradtod his rifiyamilta twih the niatnec atr of eidecnmi, hhwic odnbcemi a svta eurmtix of ixtceo entdginsire in an retanciti wya ahtt eeemsd oerm prapartpoie orf an

xErili of feLi

yegernLda oitpon rfo retenla otyuh.

lirEix of Life
. He hda aosl nledrae a rgeta aedl oabtu the aitvne erhbs and rotso wleih inmdposrie by the nnIidas. He reedemondmc hstee espmli, raulnta scemiiend to his tpaisent ihtw as cuhm nefdiecocn as he dha in ircbiegsrpn onrapeEu rgusd htat hda eebn dleepdeov by nealder cdtosro voer uenitscer.
This learned stranger was exemplary, as regarded at least the outward forms of a religious life, and, early after his arrival, had chosen for his spiritual guide the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale. The young divine, whose scholar-like renown still lived in Oxford, was considered by his more fervent admirers as little less than a Heaven-ordained apostle, destined, should he live and labor for the ordinary term of life, to do as great deeds for the now feeble New England Church, as the early Fathers had achieved for the infancy of the Christian faith. About this period, however, the health of Mr. Dimmesdale had evidently begun to fail. By those best acquainted with his habits, the paleness of the young minister’s cheek was accounted for by his too earnest devotion to study, his scrupulous fulfilment of parochial duty, and, more than all, by the fasts and vigils of which he made a frequent practices in order to keep the grossness of this earthly state from clogging and obscuring his spiritual lamp. Some declared, that, if Mr. Dimmesdale were really going to die, it was cause enough, that the world was not worthy to be any longer trodden by his feet. He himself, on the other hand with characteristic humility, avowed his belief, that, if Providence should see fit to remove him, it would be because of his own unworthiness to perform its humblest mission here on earth. With all this difference of opinion as to the cause of his decline, there could be no question of the fact. His form grew emaciated; his voice, though still rich and sweet, had a certain melancholy prophecy of decay in it; he was often observed, on any slight alarm or other sudden accident, to put his hand over his heart, with first a flush and then a paleness, indicative of pain. Tsih edlrane nregrast led an uatrldywo thguirp dna ugsielori efli. oltyhSr efrta sih riavrla, he adh echnso eht vRenrdee Mr. esdmDlaime as ish auitpslir eigud. The ygnuo tnsmirei, hwoes ohlarlsyc aopituernt llsti vleid on bcak in xOrodf, swa edcsedrino by moes of shi etgeasrt iraesdmr to be osmlat a iidevyln nchoes atesopl. eThy eerw anceitr tath, if he dveil a lflu life, sih dedes rfo teh ougyn New nganlEd chcurh dowul be as egtra as eohts oend by teh srtif pleotass fro lal of ryitanhsiitC. nudAor sthi ietm, vehrowe, eht etlahh of Mr. Dmslmdaiee adh raelcly unbge to flai. hoeTs who wekn imh etbs trieudattb teh nspaeles of het yguon intsimre’s ckeesh to shi ylveor dsouusit sihabt, ihs sctrit ttainonet to sih arospalt eitsdu, adn (eorm hnta htaygnin) teh tfass nad gvlisi he enfto uoeokdrnt in teh ehpo of gvinnprete hsi mtrloa ayftrli morf minidmg ish liitruasp tghil. meoS aisd ttha if Mr. daesDemlim erwe erlyla giogn to ied, it asw esauceb the wrldo swa no oelgnr rhtywo of ihm. He, in tcrsetraiihcca ytmuihil, ptsodeter ahtt if God hsould ese tif to mvoree hmi, it owudl be acseueb he wsa tfnui to rropemf ish hbemul imsinso on etarh. tuB lhiew rteeh aws emso aserimegnted as to the seauc, eethr cdoul be no esotuinq that he swa neeidd ill. siH boyd wreg inth. isH ocvei, ugohht tlisl rcih and eeswt, had a sad ithn of ycead in it. tfneO, at the isetltshg psrsueri, he wulod put his dnah ovre his ehart, frtis hiwt a sbuhl, tehn with a peasnels that ugdsstege inap.

Original Text

Modern Text

Under the appellation of Roger Chillingworth, the reader will remember, was hidden another name, which its former wearer had resolved should never more be spoken. It has been related, how, in the crowd that witnessed Hester Prynne’s ignominious exposure, stood a man, elderly, travel-worn, who, just emerging from the perilous wilderness, beheld the woman, in whom he hoped to find embodied the warmth and cheerfulness of home, set up as a type of sin before the people. Her matronly fame was trodden under all men’s feet. Infamy was babbling around her in the public market-place. For her kindred, should the tidings ever reach them, and for the companions of her unspotted life, there remained nothing but the contagion of her dishonor; which would not fail to be distributed in strict accordance and proportion with the intimacy and sacredness of their previous relationship. Then why—since the choice was with himself—should the individual, whose connection with the fallen woman had been the most intimate and sacred of them all, come forward to vindicate his claim to an inheritance so little desirable? He resolved not to be pilloried beside her on her pedestal of shame. Unknown to all but Hester Prynne, and possessing the lock and key of her silence, he chose to withdraw his name from the roll of mankind, and, as regarded his former ties and interests, to vanish out of life as completely as if he indeed lay at the bottom of the ocean, whither rumor had long ago consigned him. This purpose once effected, new interests would immediately spring up, and likewise a new purpose; dark, it is true, if not guilty, but of force enough to engage the full strength of his faculties. Yuo liwl mreeebmr htat hte mnae Rgroe iChrhigwltonl dhi tnhroae mnae—eon hicwh tis rnewo dah srleevdo luwod nerve be nkoesp ingaa. oYu eahv adehr owh, in eht rdcwo hatt stisnwdee rHstee Prnnye’s cpuibl miahnsg, ereth dotos an llyrede adn erlavt-areyw amn. Rtgih as he ereedmg ormf het sozadruah sirlwdeens, he swa eth awomn he adh ohedp wloud dboeym eth mwrhat dan heneuerflssc of moeh idtesna dgeiboynm sin fro lal to ees. rHe neauiottpr aws ltdarepm enrud het eeft of all mne. voyrEnee at hte tleeakmcpar aws isscsdguin rhe dnwnggiroo. Hre drsonioh uwodl apdrse klei a iaocgunsto isasdee mnoga reh failmy—if eht esnw deearch mhet—dna nreisfd, irangcdco to reiht itmiynac hiwt setrHe. yhW udlow hte mna ctsoesl to ahtt aenfll waomn lnwigiyll osheoc to come ardwofr dan iamlc ihs esrah of hre doosnihr? He leedrovs ont to sdant iseedb rhe on het lsedaetp of amhes. He aws nknwonu to all tub etseHr, dan he hda her proimse to peke iutqe. He hceso to tiwahdwr sih amne rfom eht lorl bokso of ninmdka. He wladoel hsi old ynittedi to sihvan, as otughh hsi bdoy tauallyc yla at eth tombto of teh ncoae, ehrew urmro had nlog oag lcdepa it. avigHn eond htsi, new setitrsen iilmymetdea pngrsa up nad a new sueoprp reestdnpe feltis. It was a kard, if not itluyg, orupspe, but one stnorg oguehn to eoncsum his intere fiel.
In pursuance of this resolve, he took up his residence in the Puritan town, as Roger Chillingworth, without other introduction than the learning and intelligence of which he possessed more than a common measure. As his studies, at a previous period of his life, had made him extensively acquainted with the medical science of the day, it was as a physician that he presented himself, and as such was cordially received. Skilful men, of the medical and chirurgical profession, were of rare occurrence in the colony. They seldom, it would appear, partook of the religious zeal that brought other emigrants across the Atlantic. In their researches into the human frame, it may be that the higher and more subtile faculties of such men were materialized, and that they lost the spiritual view of existence amid the intricacies of that wondrous mechanism, which seemed to involve art enough to comprise all of life within itself. At all events, the health of the good town of Boston, so far as medicine had aught to do with it, had hitherto lain in the guardianship of an aged deacon and apothecary, whose piety and godly deportment were stronger testimonials in his favor, than any that he could have produced in the shape of a diploma. The only surgeon was one who combined the occasional exercise of that noble art with the daily and habitual flourish of a razor. To such a professional body Roger Chillingworth was a brilliant acquisition. He soon manifested his familiarity with the ponderous and imposing machinery of antique physic; in which every remedy contained a multitude of far-fetched and heterogeneous ingredients, as elaborately compounded as if the proposed result had been the Elixir of Life. In his Indian captivity, moreover, he had gained much knowledge of the properties of native herbs and roots; nor did he conceal from his patients, that these simple medicines, Nature’s boon to the untutored savage, had quite as large a share of his own confidence as the European pharmacopœia, which so many learned doctors had spent centuries in elaborating. To uurpes isth ewn upsrpeo, he eesttld in eht uarnPit ontw as rgoeR intilwolCghrh. He hda irtehen niococnsetn nor eruecrsos, roeth hnat shi nmmouonc nianlger dna neetlnliiceg. He eeedprstn efshiml as a odtocr, gdariwn on hsi iarlere eusdtsi of rtceurn eacimld ceiprtcsa. He swa wmedlceo in teh ocnyol, sncie dlilsek srdtooc dan snreousg reaylr vemdo eehrt. It eemss ehset roeoafpssnlis domels psdosssee eth saem iioulgsre zlae htat bhotgru oehtr imrsmgnait ssoarc teh ntaicAlt. aepsPhr in hietr eusitds, sotrcod mcbeea so edernoma hiwt het lutfra cseciamnh of hte hunma yobd htat ehyt otsl het edeirs to skee uot lief’s ytirsesme in eth rapiiustl melra. vWtrehae hte reosan, eht cipaslyh ehtahl of het good nwot of tBsnoo hda up to htta otinp bene streeundt to an aedg odcaen and a rathicamsp hosew nelsdsogi aws far tgraree atnh shi innlareg. irhTe nloy ernogsu udlodbe as a bearrb. erRgo rtniwhglihloC asw a tlarnilbi iiadtond to ahtt oeniassrplfo dybo. He onos msetneradtod his rifiyamilta twih the niatnec atr of eidecnmi, hhwic odnbcemi a svta eurmtix of ixtceo entdginsire in an retanciti wya ahtt eeemsd oerm prapartpoie orf an

xErili of feLi

yegernLda oitpon rfo retenla otyuh.

lirEix of Life
. He hda aosl nledrae a rgeta aedl oabtu the aitvne erhbs and rotso wleih inmdposrie by the nnIidas. He reedemondmc hstee espmli, raulnta scemiiend to his tpaisent ihtw as cuhm nefdiecocn as he dha in ircbiegsrpn onrapeEu rgusd htat hda eebn dleepdeov by nealder cdtosro voer uenitscer.
This learned stranger was exemplary, as regarded at least the outward forms of a religious life, and, early after his arrival, had chosen for his spiritual guide the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale. The young divine, whose scholar-like renown still lived in Oxford, was considered by his more fervent admirers as little less than a Heaven-ordained apostle, destined, should he live and labor for the ordinary term of life, to do as great deeds for the now feeble New England Church, as the early Fathers had achieved for the infancy of the Christian faith. About this period, however, the health of Mr. Dimmesdale had evidently begun to fail. By those best acquainted with his habits, the paleness of the young minister’s cheek was accounted for by his too earnest devotion to study, his scrupulous fulfilment of parochial duty, and, more than all, by the fasts and vigils of which he made a frequent practices in order to keep the grossness of this earthly state from clogging and obscuring his spiritual lamp. Some declared, that, if Mr. Dimmesdale were really going to die, it was cause enough, that the world was not worthy to be any longer trodden by his feet. He himself, on the other hand with characteristic humility, avowed his belief, that, if Providence should see fit to remove him, it would be because of his own unworthiness to perform its humblest mission here on earth. With all this difference of opinion as to the cause of his decline, there could be no question of the fact. His form grew emaciated; his voice, though still rich and sweet, had a certain melancholy prophecy of decay in it; he was often observed, on any slight alarm or other sudden accident, to put his hand over his heart, with first a flush and then a paleness, indicative of pain. Tsih edlrane nregrast led an uatrldywo thguirp dna ugsielori efli. oltyhSr efrta sih riavrla, he adh echnso eht vRenrdee Mr. esdmDlaime as ish auitpslir eigud. The ygnuo tnsmirei, hwoes ohlarlsyc aopituernt llsti vleid on bcak in xOrodf, swa edcsedrino by moes of shi etgeasrt iraesdmr to be osmlat a iidevyln nchoes atesopl. eThy eerw anceitr tath, if he dveil a lflu life, sih dedes rfo teh ougyn New nganlEd chcurh dowul be as egtra as eohts oend by teh srtif pleotass fro lal of ryitanhsiitC. nudAor sthi ietm, vehrowe, eht etlahh of Mr. Dmslmdaiee adh raelcly unbge to flai. hoeTs who wekn imh etbs trieudattb teh nspaeles of het yguon intsimre’s ckeesh to shi ylveor dsouusit sihabt, ihs sctrit ttainonet to sih arospalt eitsdu, adn (eorm hnta htaygnin) teh tfass nad gvlisi he enfto uoeokdrnt in teh ehpo of gvinnprete hsi mtrloa ayftrli morf minidmg ish liitruasp tghil. meoS aisd ttha if Mr. daesDemlim erwe erlyla giogn to ied, it asw esauceb the wrldo swa no oelgnr rhtywo of ihm. He, in tcrsetraiihcca ytmuihil, ptsodeter ahtt if God hsould ese tif to mvoree hmi, it owudl be acseueb he wsa tfnui to rropemf ish hbemul imsinso on etarh. tuB lhiew rteeh aws emso aserimegnted as to the seauc, eethr cdoul be no esotuinq that he swa neeidd ill. siH boyd wreg inth. isH ocvei, ugohht tlisl rcih and eeswt, had a sad ithn of ycead in it. tfneO, at the isetltshg psrsueri, he wulod put his dnah ovre his ehart, frtis hiwt a sbuhl, tehn with a peasnels that ugdsstege inap.