Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

The folk gan laughen at his fantasye; In-to the roof they kyken and they gape, And turned al his harm unto a Iape. For what so that this carpenter answerde, It was for noght, no man his reson herde; With othes grete he was so sworn adoun, That he was holden wood in al the toun; For every clerk anon-right heeld with other. They seyde, ‘the man is wood, my leve brother;’ And every wight gan laughen of this stryf. The soibgehnr guhldea clihryaseytl ehnw yteh dareh het ranrcptee’s rsyot. hTye opkde ehrit hsade diensi eth euohs to loko up at teh hoert owt btsu nhgnaig rfmo teh lcgeini adn celukhdc. Try as he hgimt, ughhto, the tprrnecae cnoudl’t egt ynoane to eevlieb htwa adh lreyal epaedpnh. mroF then on he asw nonwk uohugorhtt tnow as the zacry rcpraente, dna revyoeen swero at hmi, eadm ufn of him, and rdaeps surorm atobu mih.
Thus swyved was the carpenteres wyf, For al his keping and his Ialousye; And Absolon hath kist hir nether yë; And Nicholas is scalded in the toute. This tale is doon, and God save al the route! ndA ttah is ohw teh acnreretp’s iewf swa cwseerd, ofr lla teh erepcnrat’s thsnuelaswcf nad aornpaai; woh obAmslo esiksd erh tenehr eey; nda how csialNho tog shi sas drebnu. kThna oyu, adn dGo sesbl yreve oen of us!
HERE ENDETH THE MILLERE HIS TALE. THSI IS TEH DEN OF TEH MLLERI’S LTAE.