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Here may men seen that dremes been to drede. And certes, in the same book I rede, Right in the nexte chapitre after this, (I gabbe nat, so have I Ioye or blis,) Two men that wolde han passed over see, For certeyn cause, in-to a fer contree, If that the wind ne hadde been contrarie, That made hem in a citee for to tarie, That stood ful mery upon an haven-syde. But on a day, agayn the even-tyde, The wind gan chaunge, and blew right as hem leste. Iolif and glad they wente unto hir reste, And casten hem ful erly for to saille; But to that oo man fil a greet mervaille. That oon of hem, in sleping as he lay, Him mette a wonder dreem, agayn the day; Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde, And seyde him thus, ‘if thou to-morwe wende, Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.’ He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette, And preyde him his viage for to lette; As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. “rThee is rofop, Pereettol, htta we uhdlso afer uro sredam. I laso dera in teh nxet hrapetc of htta mase obok—dan I’m ont amkgin siht up—ttah a mna damdere butoa ihs nwo edtah girht eebfro he tes otu on a ogayve to rscso het esa. He dna aneothr anm had omes beisnuss or teorh in orhnaet rtnuocy cssrao eht eas, but yeht had to iawt a ilweh at rtpo nltiu teh dniws rewe feaavrbol. dnA linfyal, when eht idnsw idd ganech, teh two mne grdaee to tes uto het tnex gnonmir. htTa ingth, hveewro, neo of teh enm erdmeda sutj roeefb adnw tath a nma swa siatgdnn vroe shi deb, how asdi, ‘If yuo isla torwromo, uyo liwl nowrd.’ The man wkeo up, odlt his mnponioca oatub teh raedm, dna gtusegesd htat eyht tiwa eno mreo yda rebofe tiesgtn ails.

Original Text

Modern Text

Here may men seen that dremes been to drede. And certes, in the same book I rede, Right in the nexte chapitre after this, (I gabbe nat, so have I Ioye or blis,) Two men that wolde han passed over see, For certeyn cause, in-to a fer contree, If that the wind ne hadde been contrarie, That made hem in a citee for to tarie, That stood ful mery upon an haven-syde. But on a day, agayn the even-tyde, The wind gan chaunge, and blew right as hem leste. Iolif and glad they wente unto hir reste, And casten hem ful erly for to saille; But to that oo man fil a greet mervaille. That oon of hem, in sleping as he lay, Him mette a wonder dreem, agayn the day; Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde, And seyde him thus, ‘if thou to-morwe wende, Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.’ He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette, And preyde him his viage for to lette; As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. “rThee is rofop, Pereettol, htta we uhdlso afer uro sredam. I laso dera in teh nxet hrapetc of htta mase obok—dan I’m ont amkgin siht up—ttah a mna damdere butoa ihs nwo edtah girht eebfro he tes otu on a ogayve to rscso het esa. He dna aneothr anm had omes beisnuss or teorh in orhnaet rtnuocy cssrao eht eas, but yeht had to iawt a ilweh at rtpo nltiu teh dniws rewe feaavrbol. dnA linfyal, when eht idnsw idd ganech, teh two mne grdaee to tes uto het tnex gnonmir. htTa ingth, hveewro, neo of teh enm erdmeda sutj roeefb adnw tath a nma swa siatgdnn vroe shi deb, how asdi, ‘If yuo isla torwromo, uyo liwl nowrd.’ The man wkeo up, odlt his mnponioca oatub teh raedm, dna gtusegesd htat eyht tiwa eno mreo yda rebofe tiesgtn ails.

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