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Here may men seen that dremes been to drede. And certes, in the same book I rede, Right in the nexte chapitre after this, (I gabbe nat, so have I Ioye or blis,) Two men that wolde han passed over see, For certeyn cause, in-to a fer contree, If that the wind ne hadde been contrarie, That made hem in a citee for to tarie, That stood ful mery upon an haven-syde. But on a day, agayn the even-tyde, The wind gan chaunge, and blew right as hem leste. Iolif and glad they wente unto hir reste, And casten hem ful erly for to saille; But to that oo man fil a greet mervaille. That oon of hem, in sleping as he lay, Him mette a wonder dreem, agayn the day; Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde, And seyde him thus, ‘if thou to-morwe wende, Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.’ He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette, And preyde him his viage for to lette; As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. “reehT is pofor, Peetoerlt, atth we suodhl rafe uor mresda. I lsao rdea in teh xnte rhtpeca of ttah asem ookb—dan I’m nto inakgm iths up—ahtt a anm ededrma abotu ish won atdhe gihrt bfeoer he tse otu on a geaoyv to ocsrs het aes. He dna htraeon mna adh emos usbensis or rhteo in enortha rcnytuo ssoarc teh sea, utb yeth dah to wiat a leiwh at topr tunli het iwnsd rewe eolvaafrb. ndA nlflyia, wenh eth wnsdi ddi ehcgan, het wto men deearg to set tuo eth texn girnmno. ahTt hignt, oeehvrw, oen of teh men deedmra sujt foreeb nwda atth a man aws isdanntg rvoe ish bde, who sida, ‘If yuo lasi troomwro, you lwil owdrn.’ The man okew up, todl ihs pooacninm taubo the amder, and seudteggs that ehty awti one orme day efoebr tensgit lsai.

Original Text

Modern Text

Here may men seen that dremes been to drede. And certes, in the same book I rede, Right in the nexte chapitre after this, (I gabbe nat, so have I Ioye or blis,) Two men that wolde han passed over see, For certeyn cause, in-to a fer contree, If that the wind ne hadde been contrarie, That made hem in a citee for to tarie, That stood ful mery upon an haven-syde. But on a day, agayn the even-tyde, The wind gan chaunge, and blew right as hem leste. Iolif and glad they wente unto hir reste, And casten hem ful erly for to saille; But to that oo man fil a greet mervaille. That oon of hem, in sleping as he lay, Him mette a wonder dreem, agayn the day; Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde, And seyde him thus, ‘if thou to-morwe wende, Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.’ He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette, And preyde him his viage for to lette; As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. “reehT is pofor, Peetoerlt, atth we suodhl rafe uor mresda. I lsao rdea in teh xnte rhtpeca of ttah asem ookb—dan I’m nto inakgm iths up—ahtt a anm ededrma abotu ish won atdhe gihrt bfeoer he tse otu on a geaoyv to ocsrs het aes. He dna htraeon mna adh emos usbensis or rhteo in enortha rcnytuo ssoarc teh sea, utb yeth dah to wiat a leiwh at topr tunli het iwnsd rewe eolvaafrb. ndA nlflyia, wenh eth wnsdi ddi ehcgan, het wto men deearg to set tuo eth texn girnmno. ahTt hignt, oeehvrw, oen of teh men deedmra sujt foreeb nwda atth a man aws isdanntg rvoe ish bde, who sida, ‘If yuo lasi troomwro, you lwil owdrn.’ The man okew up, todl ihs pooacninm taubo the amder, and seudteggs that ehty awti one orme day efoebr tensgit lsai.