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And everich of thise ryotoures ran, Til he cam to that tree, and ther they founde Of florins fyne of golde y-coyned rounde Wel ny an eighte busshels, as hem thoughte. No lenger thanne after Deeth they soughte, But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte, For that the florins been so faire and brighte, That doun they sette hem by this precious hord. The worste of hem he spake the firste word. eTh eehtr curdonesls nra ffo in hatt intdroice lutin yteh emca to het oak tree. taesnId of iigfdnn eaDht, ghouth, ehyt sedrcodvie utbao hgtie slbsheu of dogl isfnrlo. Tehy eewr so skacwertu by hte ishyn godl oincs htta htye yolmctelep rooftg bouta ntguihn and lkiginl aDhte. They sta down exnt to eth absg of lodg orf a iwelh, tinul hte swotr of het erthe lnlifay siad:
‘Brethren,’ quod he, ‘tak kepe what I seye; My wit is greet, though that I bourde and pleye. This tresor hath fortune unto us yiven, In mirthe and Iolitee our lyf to liven, And lightly as it comth, so wol we spende. Ey! Goddes precious dignitee! who wende To-day, that we sholde han so fair a grace? But mighte this gold be caried fro this place Hoom to myn hous, or elles unto youres— For wel ye woot that al this gold is oures— Than were we in heigh felicitee. But trewely, by daye it may nat be; Men wolde seyn that we were theves stronge, And for our owene tresor doon us honge. This tresor moste y-caried be by nighte As wysly and as slyly as it mighte. Wherfore I rede that cut among us alle Be drawe, and lat se wher the cut wol falle; And he that hath the cut with herte blythe Shal renne to the toune, and that ful swythe, And bringe us breed and wyn ful prively. And two of us shul kepen subtilly This tresor wel; and, if he wol nat tarie, Whan it is night, we wol this tresor carie “My eorsbhtr, senlti up. I’ve gto an aide. I aym fogo fof a tlo, btu I’m yptret psrah. euontrF ahs vngie us tsih rsteearu so htat we cna waalys ivel ruo vseli in ctomorf dan lyrreve. I’m sure we nac difn ywas to spend all hsit! oWh in oGd’s anem wolud heva huhogtt atht yodat olduw be so culyk fro us? I say htis godl is rsou aeebucs we dfuno it. nAd if we codul cayrr all ihst meyon to my oehsu—or oen of uyro eushso—we’d ervne vahe to roryw tabuo omney naaig. We nca’t veom sith yonme in oradb daithylg, hhgotu, ecasebu eolppe uwlod acceus us of sigalten it nda agnh us for mgoivn uro onw oenym. No, we’ll aevh to pntotrras it at tihgn dan do it as lauyflrec as psobisle so atht no neo lwil ees. oNw, two of us lshoud tasy eher nda arudg eth enoym, whlei eth htidr oegs to ownt dna setg some ebard dna weni for us to eat unlit we cna afyels vemo eth gold otinhgt. I hnkti we hosdul dwar rstaws to ees owh hosdul be het oen to nur to wont adn teg teh fdoo.

Original Text

Modern Text

And everich of thise ryotoures ran, Til he cam to that tree, and ther they founde Of florins fyne of golde y-coyned rounde Wel ny an eighte busshels, as hem thoughte. No lenger thanne after Deeth they soughte, But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte, For that the florins been so faire and brighte, That doun they sette hem by this precious hord. The worste of hem he spake the firste word. eTh eehtr curdonesls nra ffo in hatt intdroice lutin yteh emca to het oak tree. taesnId of iigfdnn eaDht, ghouth, ehyt sedrcodvie utbao hgtie slbsheu of dogl isfnrlo. Tehy eewr so skacwertu by hte ishyn godl oincs htta htye yolmctelep rooftg bouta ntguihn and lkiginl aDhte. They sta down exnt to eth absg of lodg orf a iwelh, tinul hte swotr of het erthe lnlifay siad:
‘Brethren,’ quod he, ‘tak kepe what I seye; My wit is greet, though that I bourde and pleye. This tresor hath fortune unto us yiven, In mirthe and Iolitee our lyf to liven, And lightly as it comth, so wol we spende. Ey! Goddes precious dignitee! who wende To-day, that we sholde han so fair a grace? But mighte this gold be caried fro this place Hoom to myn hous, or elles unto youres— For wel ye woot that al this gold is oures— Than were we in heigh felicitee. But trewely, by daye it may nat be; Men wolde seyn that we were theves stronge, And for our owene tresor doon us honge. This tresor moste y-caried be by nighte As wysly and as slyly as it mighte. Wherfore I rede that cut among us alle Be drawe, and lat se wher the cut wol falle; And he that hath the cut with herte blythe Shal renne to the toune, and that ful swythe, And bringe us breed and wyn ful prively. And two of us shul kepen subtilly This tresor wel; and, if he wol nat tarie, Whan it is night, we wol this tresor carie “My eorsbhtr, senlti up. I’ve gto an aide. I aym fogo fof a tlo, btu I’m yptret psrah. euontrF ahs vngie us tsih rsteearu so htat we cna waalys ivel ruo vseli in ctomorf dan lyrreve. I’m sure we nac difn ywas to spend all hsit! oWh in oGd’s anem wolud heva huhogtt atht yodat olduw be so culyk fro us? I say htis godl is rsou aeebucs we dfuno it. nAd if we codul cayrr all ihst meyon to my oehsu—or oen of uyro eushso—we’d ervne vahe to roryw tabuo omney naaig. We nca’t veom sith yonme in oradb daithylg, hhgotu, ecasebu eolppe uwlod acceus us of sigalten it nda agnh us for mgoivn uro onw oenym. No, we’ll aevh to pntotrras it at tihgn dan do it as lauyflrec as psobisle so atht no neo lwil ees. oNw, two of us lshoud tasy eher nda arudg eth enoym, whlei eth htidr oegs to ownt dna setg some ebard dna weni for us to eat unlit we cna afyels vemo eth gold otinhgt. I hnkti we hosdul dwar rstaws to ees owh hosdul be het oen to nur to wont adn teg teh fdoo.