Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 2

page Act 2 Scene 2 Page 2

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SECOND OFFICER

He hath deserved worthily of his country: and his
25ascent is not by such easy degrees as those who,
having been supple and courteous to the people,
bonneted, without any further deed to have them at
all into their estimation and report: but he hath so
planted his honours in their eyes, and his actions
30in their hearts, that for their tongues to be
silent, and not confess so much, were a kind of
ingrateful injury; to report otherwise, were a
malice, that, giving itself the lie, would pluck
reproof and rebuke from every ear that heard it.

SECOND OFFICER

He has served his country honorably and his route to prominence has not been nearly as easy as those who, having been lenient and kind to the people, only tipped their hats to get ahead. But he has boasted in their faces so much about his fame and his actions, that if they don’t pay attention to this, they would be harming themselves. If they lie about his prideful behavior, no one would believe them. Everyone would say otherwise.

FIRST OFFICER

35No more of him; he is a worthy man: make way, they
are coming.

FIRST OFFICER

Stop talking about him. He’s a worthy man. Make way. They’re coming.
A sennet. Enter, with actors before them, COMINIUS the consul, MENENIUS, CORIOLANUS, Senators, SICINIUS and BRUTUS. The Senators take their places; the Tribunes take their Places by themselves. CORIOLANUS stands
Trumpets sound. COMINIUS the consul, MENENIUS, CORIOLANUS, Senators, SICINIUS, and BRUTUS enter, with attendants going in before them. The Senators take their places. SICINIUS and BRUTUS take their places by themselves. CORIOLANUS stands.

MENENIUS

Having determined of the Volsces and
To send for Titus Lartius, it remains,
As the main point of this our after-meeting,
40To gratify his noble service that
Hath thus stood for his country: therefore,
please you,
Most reverend and grave elders, to desire
The present consul, and last general
45In our well-found successes, to report
A little of that worthy work perform’d
By Caius Martius Coriolanus, whom
We met here both to thank and to remember
With honours like himself. (Coriolanus sits)

MENENIUS

Once we decide what to do about the Volsces and send for Titus Lartius, the main point of this meeting is still to reward his noble service in defending his country. Therefore, most respected and honorable elders, the present consul and the general in our victorious battles desires to report a little of the worthy work performed by Caius Martius Coriolanus, whom we have invited here both to thank and to honor.
(Coriolanus sits)