Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 2

page Act 2 Scene 2 Page 6

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MENENIUS

Worthy man!

MENENIUS

Worthy man!

FIRST SENATOR

He cannot but with measure fit the honours
140Which we devise him.

FIRST SENATOR

He definitely measures up to the honors we have for him.

COMINIUS

Our spoils he kick’d at,
And look’d upon things precious as they were
The common muck of the world: he covets less
Than misery itself would give; rewards
145His deeds with doing them, and is content
To spend the time to end it.

COMINIUS

He rejected our spoils and looked at precious things as if they were the common muck of the world. He doesn’t desire anything. To him, doing his deeds is its own reward, and he’s happy to spend the time to do the job well.

MENENIUS

He’s right noble:
Let him be call’d for.

MENENIUS

He’s very noble. Let’s call him here.

FIRST SENATOR

Call Coriolanus.

FIRST SENATOR

Call Coriolanus.

OFFICER

150He doth appear.

OFFICER

Here he is.
Re-enter CORIOLANUS
CORIOLANUS re-enters.

MENENIUS

The senate, Coriolanus, are well pleased
To make thee consul.

MENENIUS

Coriolanus, the Senate is very happy to admit you to the consul.

CORIOLANUS

I do owe them still
My life and services.

CORIOLANUS

I’ll always owe them my life and services.

MENENIUS

155It then remains
That you do speak to the people.

MENENIUS

All that remains is for you to speak to the people.

CORIOLANUS

I do beseech you,
Let me o’erleap that custom, for I cannot
Put on the gown, stand naked and entreat them,
160For my wounds’ sake, to give their suffrage: please you
That I may pass this doing.

CORIOLANUS

I beg you, let me skip that custom. I can’t put on the gown, stand without an undershirt, and show off my wounds just so they’ll vote for me. Please let me pass on doing this.