Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

MENENIUS

You worthy tribunes,—

MENENIUS

You worthy tribunes—

SICINIUS

335He shall be thrown down the Tarpeian rock
With rigorous hands: he hath resisted law,
And therefore law shall scorn him further trial
Than the severity of the public power
Which he so sets at nought.

SICINIUS

He’ll be thrown without mercy from the Tarpeian rock. He has resisted justice, so justice will deny him any trial other than the strength of public opinion, which to him is worthless.

FIRST CITIZEN

340He shall well know
The noble tribunes are the people’s mouths,
And we their hands.

FIRST CITIZEN

He’ll soon know that the noble tribunes speak for the people, and we, in turn, put their wishes into action.

CITIZENS

He shall, sure on’t.

CITIZENS

He will, I’m sure of it.

MENENIUS

Sir, sir,—

MENENIUS

Sir, sir—

SICINIUS

345Peace!

SICINIUS

Peace!

MENENIUS

Do not cry havoc, where you should but hunt
With modest warrant.

MENENIUS

Don’t call for his murder. Seek a lesser punishment instead.

SICINIUS

Sir, how comes’t that you
Have holp to make this rescue?

SICINIUS

Sir, didn’t you help him escape?

MENENIUS

350Hear me speak:
As I do know the consul’s worthiness,
So can I name his faults,—

MENENIUS

Listen to me. Because I know this consul’s strengths, I can also tell you his weaknesses—

SICINIUS

Consul! what consul?

SICINIUS

Consul! What consul?

MENENIUS

The consul Coriolanus.

MENENIUS

The consul Coriolanus.

BRUTUS

355He consul!

BRUTUS

He’s not consul!

CITIZENS

No, no, no, no, no.

CITIZENS

No, no, no, no, no.