Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

The same. The Forum.
The Forum.
Enter SICINIUS and BRUTUS
SICINIUS and BRUTUS enter.

BRUTUS

In this point charge him home, that he affects
Tyrannical power: if he evade us there,
Enforce him with his envy to the people,
And that the spoil got on the Antiates
5Was ne’er distributed.

BRUTUS

Drive this point home: his aim is to be a tyrant. If he dodges this accusation, confront him with his ill-will toward the people, and that the spoils won from the Antiates were never distributed.
Enter an Aedile
An aedile enters.
What, will he come?
Is he coming?

AEDILE

He’s coming.

AEDILE

He’s coming.

BRUTUS

How accompanied?

BRUTUS

Who’s he with?

AEDILE

With old Menenius, and those senators
10That always favour’d him.

AEDILE

With old Menenius and those senators that have always favored him.

SICINIUS

Have you a catalogue
Of all the voices that we have procured
Set down by the poll?

SICINIUS

Do you have a list of all the individual votes taken in our poll?

AEDILE

I have; ’tis ready.

AEDILE

I do. It’s ready.

SICINIUS

15Have you collected them by tribes?

SICINIUS

Have you counted them by district?

AEDILE

I have.

AEDILE

I have.

SICINIUS

Assemble presently the people hither;
And when they bear me say ‘It shall be so
I’ the right and strength o’ the commons,’ be it either
20For death, for fine, or banishment, then let them
If I say fine, cry ‘Fine;’ if death, cry ‘Death.’
Insisting on the old prerogative
And power i’ the truth o’ the cause.

SICINIUS

Bring the people here now, and when I say, “The decision of the people is,” whether it’s death, fine, or banishment, if I say, “fine,” have them cry, “Fine,” if “death,” cry, “Death.” They must insist on their legal right to decide this and the power that comes from the truth of their cause.