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  Act 4 Scene 5

page Act 4 Scene 5 Page 8

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SECOND SERVINGMAN

Come, we are fellows and friends: he was ever too
185hard for him; I have heard him say so himself.

SECOND SERVANT

Come, we’re fellows and friends. Caius Martius was always too much for him—I’ve heard him say so himself.

FIRST SERVINGMAN

He was too hard for him directly, to say the troth
on’t: before Corioli he scotched him and notched
him like a carbon ado.

FIRST SERVANT

He was too much for him directly, to tell the truth. At Corioles he carved him up like a piece of meat.

SECOND SERVINGMAN

An he had been cannibally given, he might have
190broiled and eaten him too.

SECOND SERVANT

If he’d been a cannibal, he might have broiled and eaten him, too.

FIRST SERVINGMAN

But, more of thy news?

FIRST SERVANT

But what other news do you have?

THIRD SERVINGMAN

Why, he is so made on here within, as if he were son
and heir to Mars; set at upper end o’ the table; no
question asked him by any of the senators, but they
195stand bald before him: our general himself makes a
mistress of him: sanctifies himself with’s hand and
turns up the white o’ the eye to his discourse. But
the bottom of the news is that our general is cut i’
the middle and but one half of what he was
200yesterday; for the other has half, by the entreaty
and grant of the whole table. He’ll go, he says,
and sowl the porter of Rome gates by the ears: he
will mow all down before him, and leave his passage polled.

THIRD SERVANT

The guests here can’t stop talking about him. It’s as if he were the son and heir to Mars. He’s sitting at the head of the table and none of the senators are asking him any questions—they’ve all taken their hats off to him. Our general himself treats him like a mistress, touching his hand like a sacred relic, listening with wide-eyed wonder to his every word. But the bottom line is that our general is now half the man he was yesterday. He’s given half his power away to Caius Martius and the whole table supports him. He says that he’ll go and catch the keeper of Rome’s gates by the ears, that he’ll mow down whoever stands in his way, leaving a trail behind him.

SECOND SERVINGMAN

And he’s as like to do’t as any man I can imagine.

SECOND SERVANT

And he’s as likely to do it as any man I can imagine.

THIRD SERVINGMAN

205Do’t! he will do’t; for, look you, sir, he has as
many friends as enemies; which friends, sir, as it
were, durst not, look you, sir, show themselves, as
we term it, his friends whilst he’s in directitude.

THIRD SERVANT

Do it! He’ll do it. Look, sir, he has as many friends as enemies—and his friends can’t actually be friends to him while he’s in dejectitude.