Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 6

page Act 4 Scene 6 Page 2

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SICINIUS

Where is he, hear you?

SICINIUS

Where is he? Have you heard?

MENENIUS

Nay, I hear nothing: his mother and his wife
Hear nothing from him.

MENENIUS

No, I hear nothing. His mother and his wife hear nothing from him.
Enter three or four Citizens
Three or four Citizens enter.

CITIZENS

The gods preserve you both!

CITIZENS

The gods preserve you both!

SICINIUS

25God-den, our neighbours.

SICINIUS

Good evening, neighbors.

BRUTUS

God-den to you all, god-den to you all.

BRUTUS

Good evening to you all, good evening to you all.

FIRST CITIZEN

Ourselves, our wives, and children, on our knees,
Are bound to pray for you both.

FIRST CITIZEN

Ourselves, our wives, and children, on our knees, keep you both in our prayers.

SICINIUS

Live, and thrive!

SICINIUS

Live and thrive!

BRUTUS

30Farewell, kind neighbours: we wish’d Coriolanus
Had loved you as we did.

BRUTUS

Farewell, kind neighbors. We wished Coriolanus had cared for you as much as we do.

CITIZENS

Now the gods keep you!

CITIZENS

Now the gods keep you!

BOTH TRIBUNES

Farewell, farewell.

BOTH TRIBUNES

Farewell, farewell.
Exeunt Citizens
The Citizens exit.

SICINIUS

This is a happier and more comely time
35Than when these fellows ran about the streets,
Crying confusion.

SICINIUS

This is a happier and more pleasant time than when the people ran in the streets, shouting their wild demands.

BRUTUS

Caius Martius was
A worthy officer i’ the war; but insolent,
O’ercome with pride, ambitious past all thinking,
40Self-loving,—

BRUTUS

Caius Martius was a brave officer in the war, but he was stubborn, overcome with pride, unreasonably ambitious, narcissistic . . .

SICINIUS

And affecting one sole throne,
Without assistance.

SICINIUS

And he thought there should be only one governing body without any counterbalancing powers.