Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 6

page Act 4 Scene 6 Page 4

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SICINIUS

Tell not me:
I know this cannot be.

SICINIUS

Don’t tell me what to do. I know this can’t be true.

BRUTUS

Not possible.

BRUTUS

It’s not possible.
Enter a Messenger
A Messenger enters.

MESSENGER

The nobles in great earnestness are going
75All to the senate-house: some news is come
That turns their countenances.

MESSENGER

The nobles are all hurrying to the Senate house. Some news has come that’s making them scowl.

SICINIUS

’Tis this slave;—
Go whip him, ’fore the people’s eyes:—his raising;
Nothing but his report.

SICINIUS

It’s this slave. Go whip him in public view. He’s incited everyone with just his report.

MESSENGER

80Yes, worthy sir,
The slave’s report is seconded; and more,
More fearful, is deliver’d.

MESSENGER

Worthy sir, the slave’s report has been confirmed, and the news is worse than we feared.

SICINIUS

What more fearful?

SICINIUS

What could be worse?

MESSENGER

It is spoke freely out of many mouths—
85How probable I do not know—that Martius,
Join’d with Aufidius, leads a power ’gainst Rome,
And vows revenge as spacious as between
The young’st and oldest thing.

MESSENGER

Many people, though I don’t know how much they actually know, are openly declaring that Martius has joined with Aufidius and is leading an army against Rome and that he vows revenge on everyone alive.

SICINIUS

This is most likely!

SICINIUS

This is highly likely!

BRUTUS

90Raised only, that the weaker sort may wish
Good Martius home again.

BRUTUS

The weak common people have only been incited in order to welcome Martius home again.

SICINIUS

The very trick on’t.

SICINIUS

It’s a trick.