Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 1 Scene 2

page Act 1 Scene 2 Page 2

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AUFIDIUS

Nor did you think it folly
To keep your great pretences veil’d till when
They needs must show themselves; which
25in the hatching,
It seem’d, appear’d to Rome. By the discovery.
We shall be shorten’d in our aim, which was
To take in many towns ere almost Rome
Should know we were afoot.

AUFIDIUS

You thought it was wise to keep your plans secret until they needed to be revealed, but it seems that the Romans knew your plans as soon as they were hatched. Since they know our intention, we can’t proceed as we had planned: to capture as many towns as possible before the Romans knew we were moving toward them.

SECOND SENATOR

30Noble Aufidius,
Take your commission; hie you to your bands:
Let us alone to guard Corioli:
If they set down before ’s, for the remove
Bring your army; but, I think, you’ll find
35They’ve not prepared for us.

SECOND SENATOR

Noble Aufidius, do your duty. Go to your men. Leave us here to guard Corioles ourselves. If they attack us, bring your army back before they take the city, but I think you’ll find they haven’t prepared for us.

AUFIDIUS

O, doubt not that;
I speak from certainties. Nay, more,
Some parcels of their power are forth already,
And only hitherward. I leave your honours.
40If we and Caius Martius chance to meet,
’Tis sworn between us we shall ever strike
Till one can do no more.

AUFIDIUS

Don’t be so sure. I’m certain when I say that some part of their army is already moving toward us. I leave you now, noblemen. If we happen to meet Caius Martius, he and I have sworn that we’ll always strike at each other until one of us can strike no more.

ALL

The gods assist you!

ALL

May the gods assist you!

AUFIDIUS

And keep your honours safe!

AUFIDIUS

And keep you noblemen safe!