No Fear Act 2 Scene 1
No Fear Act 2 Scene 1 Page 6

Original Text

Modern Text

To the Tribunes
To the Tribunes
God save your good worships! Martius is coming
home: he has more cause to be proud. Where is he wounded?
May you be well, good sirs! Martius is coming home. He has new reasons to be proud. (to Volumnia) Where is he wounded?

VOLUMNIA

I’ the shoulder and i’ the left arm there will be
large cicatrices to show the people, when he shall
145stand for his place. He received in the repulse of
Tarquin seven hurts i’ the body.

VOLUMNIA

In the shoulder and in the left arm. There will be large scars to show the people, when he stands to receive his place as consul. When he defeated the king Tarquin, he was wounded seven times.

MENENIUS

One i’ the neck, and two i’ the thigh,—there’s
nine that I know.

MENENIUS

Once in the neck and twice in the thigh. There are nine wounds that I know of.

VOLUMNIA

He had, before this last expedition, twenty-five
150wounds upon him.

VOLUMNIA

Before this last expedition, he had twenty-five wounds in total.

MENENIUS

Now it’s twenty-seven: every gash was an enemy’s grave.

MENENIUS

Now it’s twenty-seven. Every gash represents an enemy who has died.
A shout and flourish
Trumpets sound, and a shout comes from offstage.
Hark! the trumpets.
Hark! The trumpets.

VOLUMNIA

These are the ushers of Martius: before him he
carries noise, and behind him he leaves tears:
155Death, that dark spirit, in ’s nervy arm doth lie;
Which, being advanced, declines, and then men die.

VOLUMNIA

These men walk ahead of Martius to introduce him. Many cheers welcome him, and he leaves behind many tears. Death, that dark spirit, lies within his strong arm. When he raises his arm, it comes down upon his enemies and they die.
A sennet. Trumpets sound. Enter COMINIUS the general, and TITUS LARTIUS; between them, CORIOLANUS, crowned with an oaken garland; with Captains and Soldiers, and a Herald
Trumpets sound in a different melody. COMINIUS, the general, and TITUS LARTIUS enter. Between them stands CORIOLANUS crowned with a garland of oak, with captains and soldiers and a Herald

HERALD

Know, Rome, that all alone Martius did fight
Within Corioli gates: where he hath won,
With fame, a name to Caius Martius; these
160In honour follows Coriolanus.
Welcome to Rome, renowned Coriolanus!

HERALD

Romans, let it be known that Martius fought all alone within Corioles’s gates. There he won, along with honor, a new name. The name “Coriolanus” now respectfully follows “Caius Martius.” Welcome to Rome, the renowned Coriolanus!