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  Act 4 Scene 2

page Act 4 Scene 2 Page 2

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LADY MACDUFF

Fathered he is, and yet he’s fatherless.

LADY MACDUFF

He has a father, and yet he is fatherless.

ROSS

I am so much a fool, should I stay longer
It would be my disgrace and your discomfort.
30I take my leave at once.

ROSS

I have to go. If I stay longer, I’ll embarrass you and disgrace myself by crying. I’m leaving now.
Exit
ROSS exits.

LADY MACDUFF

     Sirrah, your father’s dead.
And what will you do now? How will you live?

LADY MACDUFF

Young man, your father’s dead. What are you going to do now? How are you going to live?

SON

As birds do, Mother.

SON

I will live the way birds do, Mother.

LADY MACDUFF

What, with worms and flies?

LADY MACDUFF

What? Are you going to start eating worms and flies?

SON

With what I get, I mean, and so do they.

SON

I mean I will live on whatever I get, like birds do.

LADY MACDUFF

35Poor bird! Thou ’dst never fear the net nor lime,
The pitfall nor the gin.

LADY MACDUFF

You’d be a pitiful bird. You wouldn’t know enough to be afraid of traps.

SON

Why should I, mother? Poor birds they are not set for.
My father is not dead, for all your saying.

SON

Why should I be afraid of them, Mother? If I’m a pitiful bird, like you say, hunters won’t want me. No matter what you say, my father is not dead.

LADY MACDUFF

Yes, he is dead. How wilt thou do for a father?

LADY MACDUFF

Yes, he is dead. What are you going to do for a father?

SON

40Nay, how will you do for a husband?

SON

Maybe you should ask, what will you do for a husband?

LADY MACDUFF

Why, I can buy me twenty at any market.

LADY MACDUFF

Oh, I can buy twenty husbands at any market.