Macbeth

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

ROSS
90The king hath happily received, Macbeth,
The news of thy success, and when he reads
Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
His wonders and his praises do contend
Which should be thine or his. Silenced with that,
95In viewing o'er the rest o' the selfsame day,
He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
Strange images of death. As thick as tale
Can post with post, and every one did bear
100Thy praises in his kingdom’s great defense,
And poured them down before him.
ROSS
The king was happy to hear of your success, Macbeth. Whenever he hears the story of your exploits in the fight against the rebels, he becomes so amazed it makes him speechless. He was also shocked to learn that on the same day you fought the rebels you also fought against the army of Norway, and that you weren’t the least bit afraid of death, even as you killed everyone around you. Messenger after messenger delivered news of your bravery to the king with praise for how you defended his country.
ANGUS
     We are sent
To give thee from our royal master thanks,
Only to herald thee into his sight,
Not pay thee.
ANGUS
The king sent us to give you his thanks and to bring you to him. Your real reward won’t come from us.
ROSS
105And, for an earnest of a greater honor,
He bade me, from him, call thee thane of Cawdor:
In which addition, hail, most worthy thane,
For it is thine.
ROSS
And to give you a taste of what’s in store for you, he told me to call you the thane of Cawdor. So hail, thane of Cawdor! That title belongs to you now.
BANQUO
     What, can the devil speak true?
BANQUO
(shocked) Can the devil tell the truth?
MACBETH
The thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me
110In borrowed robes?
MACBETH
The thane of Cawdor is still alive. Why are you giving me his title?
ANGUS
     Who was the thane lives yet,
But under heavy judgment bears that life
Which he deserves to lose. Whether he was combined
With those of Norway, or did line the rebel
With hidden help and vantage, or that with both
115He labored in his country’s wrack, I know not;
But treasons capital, confessed and proved,
Have overthrown him.
ANGUS
The man who was the thane of Cawdor is still alive, but he’s been sentenced to death, and he deserves to die. I don’t know whether he fought on Norway’s side, or if he secretly aided the rebels, or if he fought with both of our enemies. But his treason, which has been proven, and to which he’s confessed, means he’s finished.