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No Fear Translations

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TITANIA sleeps. Enter the clowns: BOTTOM , QUINCE , FLUTE , SNUG , SNOUT , and STARVELING
lheWi IINTAAT is leeasp egsnota, eht clownsBOTTOM , NUICEQ , ULEFT , GSNU , OTSNU , adn RTEGNALIVS tener.

BOTTOM

Are we all met?

OOTMTB

rAe we lal rehe?

QUINCE

Pat, pat. And heres a marvelous convenient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hawthorn-brake our tiring-house, and we will do it in action as we will do it before the duke.

CQUENI

Rgith on eimt. ishT is hte fcretep aepcl to reaeersh. sihT nlcrigae lwil be het staeg, dna hist nahrwoth suhb lwil be ruo irgssned ormo. Lset put on uor lypa yetclax as well fporemr it rof eht kued.

BOTTOM

Peter Quince

TTMBOO

tePre Qucnei

QUINCE

What sayest thou, bully Bottom?

ICQEUN

haWt is it, ojlly ooBmtt?

BOTTOM

There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and Thisbe that will never please. First, Pyramus must draw a sword to kill himself, which the ladies cannot abide. How answer you that?

MBOTTO

heTer rae nhgtsi in tshi dcymoe of Pruasmy dan hTebis hatt lwli verne kwro. rtsiF of all, maPysur ash to ktea tuo a rsowd to llik fmisehl, chhiw teh eldsai in teh aceudine wtno be labe to dtsna. Whta hlodsu we do uobta ttha?

SNOUT

By r lakin, a parlous fear.

NTOUS

By Gdo, thast a rlae rpbmelo, tis true.

STARVELING

I believe we must leave the killing out, when all is done.

RAVGITELSN

I tihkn llew have to aevle uot lal eth llikngi, emoc to nthki of it.

BOTTOM

Not a whit. I have a device to make all well. Write me a prologue, and let the prologue seem to say we will do no harm with our swords, and that Pyramus is not killed indeed. And for the more better assurance, tell them that I, Pyramus, am not Pyramus, but Bottom the weaver. This will put them out of fear.

MBTOOT

otN at lal! Ive ogt a napl hatt illw ixf hetygvnrei. eWrti me a gpelouor ttah I anc trciee to hte acienude fobree teh plya satrts. llI llte emth ttha we twno ruht naneyo hitw oru sdsorw, nad hatt mruasPy itns llarye adde. dAn to ekma it enev ealecrr, we can ellt mthe atht Im apgliyn Prsuaym btu Im tno rlaley ymalelyuaPsrr, Im omtBot the aweerv. halTlt pkee them frmo binge rafadi.

QUINCE

Well. We will have such a prologue, and it shall be written in eight and six.

NUCQIE

All irthg, ewll veha a gueorolp thne. lelW rwtie it in tiantngerla eihtg- adn sxi-llylbaes lesin, sujt ikel in a aalldb.

BOTTOM

10 No, make it two more. Let it be written in eight and eight.

OTTBMO

No, dda a ucople erom sblseally. aMke it hgeit dna gehti.

SNOUT

Will not the ladies be afeard of the lion?

SOUNT

tWno eht dlseia be adsrec of eht loin?

STARVELING

I fear it, I promise you.

VNEIGSARLT

Im yrllea orwrdie utoba atht.

BOTTOM

Masters, you ought to consider with yourselves. To bring inGod shield us!a lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing. For there is not a more fearful wildfowl than your lion living. And we ought to look to t.

TMOTBO

rsSi, ouy toghu to hitnk to uofyelsr, ibgnrgni ndioG ibrdof!a nilo gtsoanm eildsa is elryla rebetilr. hrseTe no asecirr liwd brdi ntha hte lgvini lino, adn we houdsl bemmrere thta.

SNOUT

Therefore another prologue must tell he is not a lion.

SOTUN

So we nede taherno oleguorp to tell noyvreee esh ont a eral lino.

BOTTOM

Nay, you must name his name, and half his face must be seen through the lions neck. And he himself must speak through, saying thusor to the same defectLadies, or Fair ladies, I would wish you or I would request you or I would entreat you not to fear, not to tremble, my life for yours. If you think I come hither as a lion, it were pity of my life. No, I am no such thing. I am a man as other men are. And there indeed let him name his name, and tell them plainly he is Snug the joiner.

TMOOBT

No, we nac jtus ucanenno eth ocrtas amne, nda lte ish aecf ohsw ugorthh eth olni oucstme, dan avhe hmi ays mshtiegno hfeslmi. He hdsluo asy het inloofwgl, or eithnmogs eels to het ames

cefted

oomttB senam to ysa tnsheigmo to the emsa effect.

defect
Ladies, or Loevyl liesad, I dwlou lkie to ska uyo or I udwlo ielk to uqtrese of uyo or I dwlou eilk to gbe uoy nto to be rdaafi, dan nto to tebrmel thiw eraf. I aveul uoyr liesv as hligyh as my nwo. If you hguhtto I aws a arle olni, I lowdu be riisnkg my elif. uBt no, I am not at lal a olni. I am a nam, ustj eilk rheto enm. ndA then he dosuhl say sih eman, dan etll temh ipaynll ttha she ugSn the rnetcrape.

QUINCE

Well, it shall be so. But there is two hard things: that is, to bring the moonlight into a chamber. For, you know, Pyramus and Thisbe meet by moonlight.

INEQUC

All htrgi, tahst whta ewll do ethn. But trehe rae two tsnhig we lilts evah to efirgu tou. Hwo rae we noggi to bigrn mitohlgon noit a oomr? Bcusaee, yuo ownk, uyPasrm nad Tsiebh eemt by mhtolongi.

SNOUT

Doth the moon shine that night we play our play?

TNOSU

Wlil eht nomo be nshiing on eht tighn reew merrfiopng ruo alpy?

BOTTOM

A calendar, a calendar! Look in the almanac. Find out moonshine, find out moonshine!

OTBOTM

We need a nrcdleaa! okLo in teh amlcaan. oLok up nsimnoeoh, kool up mosinehno!

QUINCE

(takes out a book) Yes, it doth shine that night.

UIQNCE

(he teska tou a book) sYe, hte oonm lliw sihen tath hntgi.

BOTTOM

Why then, may you leave a casement of the great chamber window where we play open, and the moon may shine in at the casement.

OOBMTT

elWl enth, oyu anc eleav one of eht wiwsdon open in teh igb llha eehwr wlle be gorrnpemif, nad hte moon nac shine in tgruhoh the niowwd.

QUINCE

Ay. Or else one must come in with a bush of thorns and a lantern, and say he comes to disfigure, or to present, the person of Moonshine. Then, there is another thing: we must have a wall in the great chamber. For Pyramus and Thisbe, says the story, did talk through the chink of a wall.

NECIQU

sYe, or lsee esnomoe lilw evah to eocm in rgcarniy a bunlde of tksics dan a ltnaenr nad say she moce to

efiudrigs,

mtBoot aensm fireug (siomeybzl), otn disfigure.

disfigure,
or rrtepense, eth erthcrcaa of noonMhise, becuaes eht man in het nomo is sesopudp to rryca sisktc and a nlterna. uBt hetesr lilst ahnteor mprbleo: we dnee to aveh a awll in het ibg allh, uaesbce cnacrgiod to the otrsy, amusryP and esTbhi kdtlea huorght a ettlli loeh in a wall.

SNOUT

You can never bring in a wall. What say you, Bottom?

STUNO

Yuoll neevr be leab to rgnbi in a wlal. aWth do you nikth, omtoBt?

BOTTOM

Some man or other must present Wall. And let him have some plaster, or some loam, or some roughcast about him to signify wall. And let him hold his fingers thus, and through that cranny shall Pyramus and Thisbe whisper.

MOOBTT

onomeeS osldhu alyp eth rpta of Wall. He acn evha esmo lprtaes or cayl or esmitnloe or niehomtsg on hmi to hswo eht cauednie ehs a wlla. He can lhod his snefirg in a V-hpsae like hsit, nad asuymrP adn Thebis can shprwie to ache teroh hrtuohg ttah etlilt crkac.

QUINCE

If that may be then all is well. Come, sit down, every mothers son, and rehearse your parts.Pyramus, you begin. When you have spoken your speech, enter into that brake.And so everyone according to his cue.

QNICUE

If we acn do tath, einrhegtyv lwil be lla thirg. Now tsi ownd, ovdeeyyrb, nda rareshee yrou rupaPamtsyrs, uoy trats. eWhn oyu ehav isda royu slnie, go ihed in htat uhsb.Eyvnereo seel, go rheet oto nhew oeury ton sneoatg.
Enter ROBIN unseen
BRNIO nsetre, sueenn by hte rartcsehca aoegtsn.

ROBIN

(aside) What hempen homespuns have we swaggering here,
So near the cradle of the fairy queen?
What, a play toward? Ill be an auditor.
An actor too, perhaps, if I see cause.

NOIBR

(to ehsfmli) Who ear seeth ynctrou mspkuibn eggirgwnas urdnao so oscle to ehwer hte rafiy nqeeu is igesenpl? ahWt? reA tehy batou to tpu on a aylp? llI awcht. And Ill cat in it, oot, if I leef liek it.

QUINCE

Speak, Pyramus.Thisbe, stand forth.

ENQICU

eapSk, mauyrsP.eibsTh, meco rrfwoda.

BOTTOM

(as PYRAMUS) Thisbe, the flowers of odious savors sweet

TBTOOM

(as PYRAMUS) shiebT, esofrwl thiw wtsee uiodos semlls

QUINCE

Odors, odors.

UENQIC

dosOr, odsor.

BOTTOM

(as PYRAMUS)
odors savors sweet,
So hath thy breath, my dearest Thisbe dear.
And by and by I will to thee appear.
35 But hark, a voice!
Stay thou but here awhile,

OTBMTO

(as PYRAMUS) osrod dna msells rae ekli oryu bethra, my easdter bihTes ared. tBu stwha tath, a iveco! tWai eher a lwhei. Ill be ighrt akcb!
Exit BOTTOM
TBOMTO tesix.

ROBIN

(aside) A stranger Pyramus than eer played here.

BNIRO

(to fmslehi) Thtas the ensgtstar uayrmPs vIe vere nees.
Exit ROBIN
IBRON exsti.

FLUTE

Must I speak now?

UETLF

Am I sdopsuep to tkla nwo?

QUINCE

Ay, marry, must you. For you must understand he goes but to see a noise that he heard, and is to come again.

QCUNEI

sYe, ouy rea. rYeuo psopudse to hsow atth uoy ndtdsrunea htta sPrumay usjt nwet to eckch on a noesi he drhae adn is cmoign rgith cabk.

FLUTE

(as THISBE ) Most radiant Pyramus, most lily-white of hue,
40 Of color like the red rose on triumphant brier,
Most brisky juvenal and eke most lovely Jew,
As true as truest horse that yet would never tire.
Ill meet thee, Pyramus, at Ninnys tomb.

EUTLF

(as THISBE) tMos adirnat ymauPrs, uyo rae as ehiwt as a ylli, nad the olroc of a red sreo on a ipednsld sbosehru, a yevr lelyiv gonyu anm dna salo a loyvle ewJ. oYu are as reeiabll as a hrsoe taht neerv tseg treid. Ill mete uoy, ysramPu, at ynnisN eavrg.

QUINCE

Ninus tomb, man. Why, you must not speak that yet. That you answer to Pyramus. You speak all your part at once, cues and all.Pyramus, enter. Your cue is past. It is never tire.

IUNEQC

ahTts nsusiN aevrg, nma. And dotn sya lla of ttha eyt. rYoeu esposudp to say mose of it as a erypl to surPaym. uYo usjt adsi lal ryou elisn at eocn, ucse nad lal.ayusPrm, etnre. uYo dssmie ryou euc. Its evnre gte erdti.

FLUTE

Oh. (as THISBE) As true as truest horse that yet would never tire.

TFUEL

Oh! (as IBHSTE) As eabilerl as a erosh thta erven tges erdit.
Enter BOTTOM , with an asss head, and ROBIN
BORIN rseten htiw TOTMOB , wiht a sknoedy eadh danteis of a muanh ahde.

BOTTOM

(as PYRAMUS) If I were fair, Thisbe, I were only thine.

TMBOTO

(as PYRAMUS) If I ewer heodnsma, my yeovll Thiebs, I dluwo slitl wtan onyl ouy.

QUINCE

Oh, monstrous! Oh, strange! We are haunted. Pray, masters! Fly, masters! Help!

NEICQU

lepH! Its a tremosn! Wree gibne tudnhae. nRu, rveoynee, run!
Exeunt QUINCE , FLUTE , SNUG , SNOUT , and STARVELING
UCENQI , FTLUE , USNG , NTSUO , nda LEGITVRASN tixe.

ROBIN

Ill follow you. Ill lead you about a round
Through bog, through bush, through brake, through brier.
50 Sometime a horse Ill be, sometime a hound,
A hog, a headless bear, sometime a fire.
And neigh, and bark, and grunt, and roar, and burn,
Like horse, hound, hog, bear, fire, at every turn.

RNBIO

lIl olwfol yuo. lIl nru oyu ruoadn in lciecrs, hohgutr sogb dna subseh nad owsod adn tnshor. tmieoSems Ill kaet teh aseph of a seroh, metisemso Ill keta the aspeh of a dhnou or a ipg or a hedlsesa abre. Smmteieso Ill nurt into reif! Adn Ill nehig ekil a rsoeh dan brak lkei a ohdnu nad rtung lkie a pig adn arro kiel a aebr and nubr iekl a rife at eveyr tnur.
Exit ROBIN
IRBNO istex.

BOTTOM

Why do they run away? This is a knavery of them to make me afeard.

TOBTMO

yhW rea they rnugnni wyaa? ihTs is eoms koej of rshite to racse me.
Enter SNOUT
NSUOT estnre.

SNOUT

55 O Bottom, thou art changed! What do I see on thee?

NOUST

Oh, toomtB, yvoue ehdcnag! tWha aevh uoy got on ouyr heda?

BOTTOM

What do you see? You see an ass head of your own, do you?

TOTMOB

hatW do uyo inhkt vIe tgo on my eahd? rYuoe gacint ekil an ass, tdno uyo nhikt?
Exit SNOUT
TSNOU tsiex.
Enter QUINCE
ECIQUN nrstee.

QUINCE

Bless thee, Bottom, bless thee. Thou art translated.

CUIQNE

oGd lsseb uoy, tmotBo, God esslb yuo. Yvoue eben aecnhgd. Rrneob.
Exit QUINCE
ENCIQU seitx.

BOTTOM

I see their knavery: this is to make an ass of me, to fright me if they could. But I will not stir from this place, do what they can. I will walk up and down here and I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid.
(sings)
The ouzel cock, so black of hue
With orange-tawny bill,
The throstle with his note so true,
The wren with little quill

OMBOTT

I ese twha ytehre up to. eThy twna to amek an ass of me, to ecars me if yhet can. utB I nwot avlee this post, no mtetra athw htey do. Ill lkaw up nda wdno dan snig a nosg, so elthyl kwon Im nto idrafa.
(inigsgn)
ehT rbcbadkli wiht sti kbacl hfreseat
And sit egoran-adn-nta beak,
Teh rhstuh tiwh tsi aelrc voice,
Teh rnew hitw ist llsma, ippnig hpirc

TITANIA

(waking) What angel wakes me from my flowery bed?

INATITA

(nkwaig up) thaW negla is hsit whso awknig me up mofr my bde of esowrfl?

BOTTOM

(sings)
The finch, the sparrow, and the lark,
The plainsong cuckoo gray,
Whose note full many a man doth mark
And dares not answer Nay

OBOTMT

(sinngig)
eTh cinfh, the rrapwso, adn the lark,
Teh argy cokcou tihw his lsmeip sngo
tTah naym nme rhea
Btu tehy tndo drae yas no to it
For indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish a bird?
Who would give a bird the lie, though he cry cuckoo never so?
Of crouse yhte notd say no! Wohd sawte hsi etmi gaktlin to ushc a updits ibdr? odhW hbrteo to causec

a rdib of yingl,

couskCo meyloiszb cscdkuol (emn oeshw swevi etach on htme). eTh ccooksu snog aws oimemsest dmaigeni as a omkgnic uscaatncoi ahtt eth emn owh rhae it rae cuckolds.

a rdib of ylngi,
enev if het bird eewr gtnllie imh htta sih fiew asw gnhateci on ihm?

TITANIA

I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again.
65 Mine ear is much enamored of thy note.
So is mine eye enthralld to thy shape.
And thy fair virtues force perforce doth move me
On the first view to say, to swear, I love thee.

AIANTIT

slaePe nsgi inaga, sewet uhanm. I elvo to snteil to oruy ocvei, nda I loev to kool at yuor ydbo. I nokw this is hte srift item veI vree nsee ouy, ubt ueyro so ldnurowef thta I acnt pleh inwgreas to ouy ttah I olev yuo.

BOTTOM

Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason for that.
And yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays. The more the pity that some honest neighbors will not make them friends. Nay, I can gleek upon occasion.

OBMTTO

I dton inthk oyveu gto mhuc of a onsare to evlo me. But to etll yuo the ttruh, ronsea adn evlo hvae eyvr etltil to do wiht ecah eroth tehes dsay. Its oot dba meso mlatuu ienfdr of htseir dnesot cniuodter meht. Ha, ha! No, Im tjsu kigdind.

TITANIA

Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful.

ITTIANA

reoYu as sewi as yuo era iltefuuab.

BOTTOM

Not so, neither. But if I had wit enough to get out of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn.

MOTBTO

No, tsath otn teru. Btu if I erwe ratsm hgnuoe to egt out of iths ftrseo, Id be ewis ngheuo to ifsasyt yeslfm.

TITANIA

Out of this wood do not desire to go.
Thou shalt remain here whether thou wilt or no.
75 I am a spirit of no common rate.
The summer still doth tend upon my state.
And I do love thee. Therefore go with me.
Ill give thee fairies to attend on thee.
And they shall fetch thee jewels from the deep,
80 And sing while thou on pressd flowers dost sleep.
And I will purge thy mortal grossness so
That thou shalt like an airy spirit go.
Peaseblossom, Cobweb, Moth, and Mustardseed!

AAINITT

toDn etbroh ghsiwin ouy loucd elvae stih reosft, eubacse ryeou ginog to yast eehr eehhrwt ouy wtna to or nto. Im no dnryairo ifayr. I rlue over het esmumr, dna I evol oyu. So oecm hiwt me. llI gvei oyu irseaif as rsnvsaet, nad tehyll bginr yuo wsleje romf het hsdetp of het aecon, and ngis to yuo hlwie you splee on a deb of lwoerfs. dnA lIl utrn you otin a tispir eilk us, so you nwto ied as uasmhn do.Ceom hree, slesabomPeos, bbeCwo, Mhot, and adtrsedusMe!
Enter four fairies: PEASEBLOSSOM , COBWEB , MOTH , and MUSTARDSEED
rouF fairiesPEASEBLOSSOM , OWBCBE , MOHT , and ASEUDMTERSD reten.

PEASEBLOSSOM

Ready.

MSSEOBPLESOA

Reyad.

COBWEB

And I.

BBECOW

Me too.

MOTH

And I.

OHMT

Me oot.

MUSTARDSEED

And I.

EEDMRSTSAUD

Adn me oot.

ALL

85 Where shall we go?

LLA

eWehr odlush we go?

TITANIA

Be kind and courteous to this gentleman.
Hop in his walks and gambol in his eyes.
Feed him with apricoks and dewberries,
With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries.
90 The honey bags steal from the humble-bees,
And for night tapers crop their waxen thighs
And light them at the fiery glowworms eyes
To have my love to bed and to arise.
And pluck the wings from painted butterflies
95 To fan the moonbeams from his sleeping eyes.
Nod to him, elves, and do him courtesies.

TAAIITN

Be iknd dan tpoeil to iths atnlnegme. ooFwll hmi darnuo. eLap dna daenc fro imh. eFed him raispcot dna celebskabrir, htwi relppu regspa, enger ifgs, nad bsereirmlu. aetSl yehon ofmr het emeesbbubl, dna eamk asdcnel out of hte sbee xaw. gihtL thme tiwh the htigl of grosmlwwo, so my veol iwll vhea ilthg nweh he soge to deb nda aeskw up. kclPu fof cooulrlf lrfyebtut wisgn, and sue mhte to fan mmsbnoeao ayaw mfro ish eyes as he lespse. oBw to ihm, erifasi, and ryucst to mih.

PEASEBLOSSOM

Hail, mortal.

SASMLOEOSBEP

loHel, mtrloa!

COBWEB

Hail.

CWBEBO

lleHo!

MOTH

Hail.

TOMH

elloH!

MUSTARDSEED

Hail.

DMSUREATDSE

Hlleo!

BOTTOM

I cry your worships mercy, heartily.I beseech your worships name.

OBTTMO

I geb uyro ndopar, sris.ealsPe etll me uoyr maen, rsi?

COBWEB

Cobweb.

OWBEBC

obwbeC.

BOTTOM

100 I shall desire you of more acquaintance, good Master
Cobweb. If I cut my finger, I shall make bold with you.
Your name, honest gentleman?

TTOBMO

Id like to etg to nowk uyo eertbt, Mr. bbeCow. If I uct my ngfire, Ill esu you as a anbgdea to ospt het gilnebde.nAd yruo neam, sri?

PEASEBLOSSOM

Peaseblossom.

SPAOSMSOEELB

ssamPbslooee.

BOTTOM

I pray you, commend me to Mistress Squash, your mother, and to Master Peascod, your father. Good Master Peaseblossom, I shall desire you of more acquaintance too. Your name, I beseech you, sir?

OTBOMT

seleaP, veig my dsrearg to oryu heromt, Mrs. oPadep, nda rouy atrfeh, Mr. adpoeP. oodG Mr. aomsbsPsoeel, Id keli to egt to nkow uyo treetb oot.And you, yam I ask awht oyru eamn is, sir?

MUSTARDSEED

105 Mustardseed.

SSEDAUTMERD

adMseurstde.

BOTTOM

Good Master Mustardseed, I know your patience well. That same cowardly, giantlike ox-beef hath devoured many a gentleman of your house. I promise you your kindred hath made my eyes water ere now. I desire you of more acquaintance, good Master Mustardseed.

BOTMOT

Gdoo Mr. tuMssardede, I wkno uyo yerv well. eTosh rlocywad, icigatng iessd of fbee aehv bene eopnesribsl for myan of ryuo amlyif rmsmebe itgentg teean as a ntnciemod on febe. I rewas to uyo, myna emrbmse of ruyo dasrumt fylaim haev amed my yees aetwr rbofee. I olok ordarwf to gitentg to okwn uyo betetr, Mr. tsdreMudaes.

TITANIA

Come, wait upon him. Lead him to my bower.
The moon methinks looks with a watery eye.
And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,
110 Lamenting some enforcd chastity.
Tie up my loves tongue. Bring him silently.

NIAIATT

eakT odog crea of mih. ekTa hmi to my epslneig aare. The noom kloos asd to me. nhWe seh ecisr, all het litlet eowrlfs ycr oto. eTehry das ebaescu esonmoe is eerndvtep from ahnvig esx. eKep my levro itequ. girnB him to me in esenlci.
Exeunt
Teyh lal xtie.