A Midsummer Night’s Dream

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 1

page Act 5 Scene 1 Page 14

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Ay, that left pap
Where heart doth hop. (stabs himself)
Thus die I, thus, thus, thus.
285Now am I dead.
Now am I fled.
My soul is in the sky.
Tongue, lose thy light.
Moon, take thy flight.
And so I’m dying. Here I go, here I go. Okay, now I’m dead. My soul has fled to the sky. My tongue shall see no more, It’s time for the moon to go away.
Exit MOONSHINE
MOONSHINE exits.
290Now die, die, die, die, die.
(dies)
Now die, die, die, die, die. (PYRAMUS dies)

DEMETRIUS

No die, but an ace for him, for he is but one.

DEMETRIUS

Is someone throwing dice? I guess it’s “die,” not dice, since there’s only one of him.

LYSANDER

Less than an ace, man. For he is dead. He is nothing.

LYSANDER

Actually he’s a die with no dots, since he’s nothing—he’s dead.

THESEUS

With the help of a surgeon he might yet recover and prove an ass.

THESEUS

With a doctor’s help he might recover and become an ass again.

HIPPOLYTA

How chance Moonshine is gone before Thisbe comes back and finds her lover?

HIPPOLYTA

If Moonshine’s gone before Thisbe comes back, how will she be able to see in the dark to find her lover dead?

THESEUS

She will find him by starlight. Here she comes, and her passion ends the play.

THESEUS

She’ll see him by starlight. Here she comes. Her moaning and groaning will end the play.
Enter THISBE
THISBE enters.

HIPPOLYTA

300Methinks she should not use a long one for such a Pyramus.
I hope she will be brief.

HIPPOLYTA

I don’t think a ridiculous Pyramus like that one deserves much moaning. I hope she keeps it short.

DEMETRIUS

A mote will turn the balance, which Pyramus, which Thisbe, is the better. He for a man, God warrant us, she for a woman, God bless us.

DEMETRIUS

I can’t decide whether Pyramus or Thisbe is better. God help us if he’s a better man. But God help us if she’s a better woman.