Romeo and Juliet

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

FRIAR LAWRENCE

There on the ground, with his own tears made drunk.

FRIAR LAWRENCE

He’s there on the ground. He’s been getting drunk on his own tears.

NURSE

Oh, he is even in my mistress' case,
85Just in her case. O woeful sympathy,
Piteous predicament! Even so lies she,
Blubbering and weeping, weeping and blubbering.
Stand up, stand up. Stand, an you be a man.
For Juliet’s sake, for her sake, rise and stand.
90Why should you fall into so deep an O?

NURSE

Oh, he’s acting just like Juliet, just like her. Oh painful sympathy! What a pitiful problem! She’s lying on the ground just like him, blubbering and weeping, weeping and blubbering. Stand up. Stand up. Stand up if you’re really a man. For Juliet’s sake, for her sake, rise and stand up. Why should you fall into so deep a moan?

ROMEO

Nurse!

ROMEO

Nurse!

NURSE

Ah sir, ah sir. Death’s the end of all.

NURSE

Ah sir, ah sir. Well, death is the end for everybody.

ROMEO

Spakest thou of Juliet? How is it with her?
Doth she not think me an old murderer,
95Now I have stained the childhood of our joy
With blood removed but little from her own?
Where is she? And how doth she? And what says
My concealed lady to our canceled love?

ROMEO

Were you talking about Juliet? How is she? Does she think that I’m a practiced murderer because I tainted our newfound joy by killing one of her close relatives? Where is she? How is she doing? What does my hidden wife say about our ruined love?

NURSE

Oh, she says nothing, sir, but weeps and weeps,
100And now falls on her bed, and then starts up,
And “Tybalt” calls, and then on Romeo cries,
And then down falls again.

NURSE

Oh, she doesn’t say anything, sir. She just weeps and weeps. She falls on her bed and then starts to get up. Then she calls out Tybalt’s name and cries “Romeo,” and then she falls down again.

ROMEO

     As if that name,
Shot from the deadly level of a gun,
Did murder her, as that name’s cursed hand
105Murdered her kinsman. O, tell me, Friar, tell me,
In what vile part of this anatomy
Doth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sack
The hateful mansion. (draws his dagger)

ROMEO

She’s calling out my name as if I were a bullet murdering her, just like I murdered her relative. Tell me, Friar, in what part of my body is my name embedded? Tell me, so I can cut it out of myself. (he draws his dagger)