Romeo and Juliet

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 5

page Act 3 Scene 5 Page 6

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LADY CAPULET

Well, well, thou hast a careful father, child.
One who, to put thee from thy heaviness,
Hath sorted out a sudden day of joy
110That thou expect’st not, nor I looked not for.

LADY CAPULET

Well, well, you have a careful father, child. He has arranged a sudden day of joy to end your sadness. A day that you did not expect and that I did not seek out.

JULIET

Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

JULIET

Madam, tell me quickly, what day is that?

LADY CAPULET

Marry, my child, early next Thursday morn,
The gallant, young, and noble gentleman,
The County Paris, at Saint Peter’s Church,
115Shall happily make thee there a joyful bride.

LADY CAPULET

Indeed, my child, at Saint Peter’s Church early Thursday morning, the gallant, young, and noble gentleman Count Paris will happily make you a joyful bride.

JULIET

Now, by Saint Peter’s Church and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride.
I wonder at this haste, that I must wed
Ere he, that should be husband, comes to woo.
120I pray you, tell my lord and father, madam,
I will not marry yet. And when I do, I swear
It shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate,
Rather than Paris. These are news indeed!

JULIET

Now, I swear by Saint Peter’s Church and Peter too, he will not make me a joyful bride there. This is a strange rush. How can I marry him, this husband, before he comes to court me? Please, tell my father, madam, I won’t marry yet. And, when I do marry, I swear, it will be Romeo, whom you know I hate, rather than Paris. That’s really news!

LADY CAPULET

Here comes your father. Tell him so yourself,
125And see how he will take it at your hands.

LADY CAPULET

Here comes your father. Tell him so yourself, and see how he takes the news.
Enter CAPULET and NURSE
CAPULET and the NURSE enter.

CAPULET

When the sun sets the air doth drizzle dew,
But for the sunset of my brother’s son
It rains downright.
How now? A conduit, girl? What, still in tears,
130Evermore showering? In one little body
Thou counterfeit’st a bark, a sea, a wind,
For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea,
Do ebb and flow with tears. The bark thy body is,
Sailing in this salt flood. The winds thy sighs,
135Who, raging with thy tears, and they with them,
Without a sudden calm will overset
Thy tempest-tossèd body.—How now, wife?
Have you delivered to her our decree?

CAPULET

When the sun sets, the air drizzles dew. But at the death of my brother’s son, it rains a downpour. What are you, girl? Some kind of fountain? Why are you still crying? Will you cry forever? In one little body you seem like a ship, the sea, and the winds. Your eyes, which I call the sea, flow with tears. The ship is your body which is sailing on the salt flood of your tears. The winds are your sighs. Your sighs and your tears are raging. Unless you calm down, tears and sighs will overwhelm your body and sink your ship. So where do things stand, wife? Have you told her our decision?