Romeo and Juliet

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

PETER and other SERVINGMEN come forth with napkins
PETER and other SERVINGMEN come forward with napkins.

PETER

Where’s Potpan, that he helps not to take away? He shift a
trencher? He scrape a trencher!

PETER

Where’s Potpan? Why isn’t he helping us clear the table? He should be moving and scraping plates!

FIRST SERVINGMAN

When good manners shall lie all in one or two men’s hands, and they unwashed too, ’tis a foul thing.

FIRST SERVINGMAN

When only one or two men have all the good manners, and even they are dirty, things are bad.

PETER

5Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save me a piece of marchpane, and, as thou loves me, let the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.—Antony and Potpan!

PETER

Take away the stools, the sideboards, and the plates. You, good friend, save me a piece of marzipan, and if you love me, have the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell. Antony and Potpan!

SECOND SERVINGMAN

Ay, boy, ready.

SECOND SERVINGMAN

Yes, boy, I’m ready.

PETER

10You are looked for and called for, asked for and sought for, in the great chamber.

PETER

They’re looking for you in the great chamber.

FIRST SERVINGMAN

We cannot be here and there too. Cheerly, boys. Be brisk
0awhile, and the longer liver take all.

FIRST SERVINGMAN

We can’t be in two places at once, both here and there! Cheers, boys. Be quick for a while and let the one who lives the longest take everything.
Exeunt PETER and SERVINGMEN
PETER and the SERVINGMEN exit.
Enter CAPULET with CAPULET'S COUSIN, TYBALT, LADY CAPULET, JULIET, and others of the house, meeting ROMEO, BENVOLIO, MERCUTIO, and other GUESTS and MASKERS
CAPULET enters with his COUSIN, TYBALT, LADY CAPULET, JULIET, and other members of the house. They meet ROMEO, BENVOLIO, MERCUTIO, and other guests and MASKERS

CAPULET

Welcome, gentlemen! Ladies that have their toes
15Ah, my mistresses! Which of you all
Unplagued with corns will walk a bout with you.—
Will now deny to dance? She that makes dainty,
She, I’ll swear, hath corns. Am I come near ye now?—
Welcome, gentlemen! I have seen the day
20That I have worn a visor and could tell
A whispering tale in a fair lady’s ear
Such as would please. 'Tis gone, ’tis gone, ’tis gone.—
You are welcome, gentlemen.—Come, musicians, play.
(music plays and they dance)
25A hall, a hall, give room!—And foot it, girls.—
More light, you knaves! And turn the tables up,
And quench the fire. The room is grown too hot.—
Ah, sirrah, this unlooked-for sport comes well.—
Nay, sit, nay, sit, good cousin Capulet,
30For you and I are past our dancing days.
How long is ’t now since last yourself and I
Were in a mask?

CAPULET

Welcome, gentlemen. The ladies who don’t have corns on their toes will dance with you. Ha, my ladies, which of you will refuse to dance now? Whichever of you acts shy, I’ll swear she has corns. Does that hit close to home? Welcome, gentlemen. There was a time when I could wear a mask over my eyes and charm a lady by whispering a story in her ear. That time is gone, gone, gone. You are welcome gentlemen. Come on, musicians, play music. (music plays and they dance, ROMEO stands apart) Make room in the hall. Make room in the hall. Shake a leg, girls. (to SERVINGMEN) More light, you rascals. Flip over the tables and get them out of the way. And put the fire out—it’s getting too hot in here. (to his COUSIN) Ah, my man, this unexpected fun feels good. No, sit down, sit down, my good Capulet cousin. You and I are too old to dance. (CAPULET and his COUSIN sit down) How long is it now since you and I last wore masks at a party like this?