The Tempest

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 2

page Act 2 Scene 2 Page 4

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CALIBAN

Thou dost me yet but little hurt. Thou wilt anon, I know it by thy trembling. Now Prosper works upon thee.

CALIBAN

You haven’t hurt me much yet, but you will soon, I can tell by your trembling. Prospero sent you here.

STEPHANO

35 (trying to give CALIBAN drink)
Come on your ways. Open your mouth. Here is that which will give language to you, cat. Open your mouth. This will shake your shaking, I can tell you, and that soundly. You cannot tell who’s your friend. Open your chaps again.

STEPHANO

(trying to make CALIBAN drink) Come on, open your mouth. This’ll help you talk. Open up. This’ll stop you from trembling—I can tell you that for sure. (CALIBAN drinks) You don’t even know who your friends are. Open up that mouth again.

TRINCULO

I should know that voice. It should be—But he is drowned, and these are devils. Oh, defend me!

TRINCULO

I almost recognize that voice. It’s—But he’s drowned, and these guys are devils. Oh, God help me!

STEPHANO

Four legs and two voices—a most delicate monster. His forward voice now is to speak well of his friend. His backward voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract. If all the wine in my bottle will recover him, I will help his ague. Come.
CALIBAN drinks
40Amen! I will pour some in thy other mouth.

STEPHANO

Four legs and two voices—a very special monster. One voice speaks well and talks about his friend. The other voice is harsh and abusive. I can charge even more for this. If it takes all the wine in my bottle, I’ll cure him. Come on. CALIBAN drinks That’s good! Now I’ll pour some in your other mouth.

TRINCULO

Stephano!

TRINCULO

Stephano!

STEPHANO

Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is a devil, and no monster. I will leave him. I have no long spoon.

STEPHANO

Is your other mouth calling my name? Mercy, mercy! This isn’t a monster, it’s a devil. I’ll leave him alone. I have no interest in getting mixed up with the devil.

TRINCULO

Stephano! If thou beest Stephano, touch me and speak to me. For I am Trinculo—be not afeard—thy good friend Trinculo.

TRINCULO

Stephano! If you’re Stephano, touch me and speak to me. I’m Trinculo—don’t be scared—your good friend Trinculo.

STEPHANO

If thou beest Trinculo, come forth. I’ll pull thee by the lesser legs. If any be Trinculo’s legs, these are they. (pulls TRINCULO out from under the gaberdine)

STEPHANO

If you’re Trinculo, then come out. I’ll pull on these smaller legs. If any legs here are Trinculo’s, these are. (he pulls TRINCULO out from under the cloak) Well,