The Winter's Tale

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 3 Scene 3
No Fear Act 3 Scene 3 Page 3

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CLOWN

Hilloa, loa!

YOKEL

Hallo!

SHEPHERD

85What, art so near? If thou’lt see a thing to talk
on when thou art dead and rotten, come hither. What
ailest thou, man?

SHEPHERD

What, are you near? If you want to see something to talk about when you are dead and rotten, come here. What is wrong with you?

CLOWN

I have seen two such sights, by sea and by land!
but I am not to say it is a sea, for it is now the
90sky: betwixt the firmament and it you cannot thrust
a bodkin’s point.

YOKEL

I’ve seen two such sights, on sea and on land! But I won’t say it is a sea, since the sky is just as wet from the storm. You couldn’t squeeze a needle’s point between the sky and the sea.

SHEPHERD

Why, boy, how is it?

SHEPHERD

Why, boy, what’s happening there?

CLOWN

I would you did but see how it chafes, how it rages,
how it takes up the shore! but that’s not the
95point. O, the most piteous cry of the poor souls!
sometimes to see ’em, and not to see ’em; now the
ship boring the moon with her main-mast, and anon
swallowed with yest and froth, as you’ld thrust a
cork into a hogshead. And then for the
100land-service, to see how the bear tore out his
shoulder-bone; how he cried to me for help and said
his name was Antigonus, a nobleman. But to make an
end of the ship, to see how the sea flap-dragoned
it: but, first, how the poor souls roared, and the
105sea mocked them; and how the poor gentleman roared
and the bear mocked him, both roaring louder than
the sea or weather.

YOKEL

I wish you could see how it rages and rushes up the shore! But that’s not the point. Oh, the pitiful cries of the men, coming in and out of sight. Then the ship would rise up so its mast looked like it hit the moon, and the next moment it was swallowed by the frothing waves. And then on land, I saw how the bear tore out his shoulder, and he cried to me for help. He said his name was Antigonus, and he was a nobleman. But to finish telling you about the ship, you should have seen how the sea swallowed it up. But first the poor men roared, and the sea mocked them, and then the poor gentleman roared, and the bear mocked him, and they both roared louder than either the sea or the storm.