The Winter's Tale

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 4

page Act 4 Scene 4 Page 24

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CAMILLO

565O my lord!
I would your spirit were easier for advice,
Or stronger for your need.

CAMILLO

Oh, my lord! I wish you had a greater inclination to take advice, or that you were stronger.

FLORIZEL

Hark, Perdita.

FLORIZEL

Listen, Perdita.
Drawing her aside
Drawing Perdita aside
I’ll hear you by and by.
(to Camillo) Camillo, I’ll listen to you in a moment.

CAMILLO

570He’s irremoveable,
Resolved for flight. Now were I happy, if
His going I could frame to serve my turn,
Save him from danger, do him love and honour,
Purchase the sight again of dear Sicilia
575And that unhappy king, my master, whom
I so much thirst to see.

CAMILLO

He’s made his mind up to flee. I would be happy if I could make this departure serve my own purposes. I can save him from danger and treat him with love and honor, and I can also gain sight of dear Sicilia and that unhappy king who is my master, and whom I long to see again.

FLORIZEL

Now, good Camillo;
I am so fraught with curious business that
I leave out ceremony.

FLORIZEL

Now, good Camillo, I’m so overwhelmed with this strange undertaking that I’ve forgotten my manners.

CAMILLO

580Sir, I think
You have heard of my poor services, i’ the love
That I have borne your father?

CAMILLO

Sir, I think you have heard of the modest services and the love I have given your father?

FLORIZEL

Very nobly
Have you deserved: it is my father’s music
585To speak your deeds, not little of his care
To have them recompensed as thought on.

FLORIZEL

The praise is well-deserved. My father delights to speak of your actions, and he hopes that he repays them as much as he praises them.