The Winter's Tale

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 4

page Act 4 Scene 4 Page 25

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CAMILLO

Well, my lord,
If you may please to think I love the king
And through him what is nearest to him, which is
590Your gracious self, embrace but my direction:
If your more ponderous and settled project
May suffer alteration, on mine honour,
I’ll point you where you shall have such receiving
As shall become your highness; where you may
595Enjoy your mistress, from the whom, I see,
There’s no disjunction to be made, but by—
As heavens forefend!—your ruin; marry her,
And, with my best endeavours in your absence,
Your discontenting father strive to qualify
600And bring him up to liking.

CAMILLO

Well, my lord, if you do believe that I love the king and what he holds most dear, which is you, take my advice: if your determined course might be altered a bit, I swear I’ll show you a place where you’ll be received in a manner fit for your highness. There you’ll be able to enjoy life with your sweetheart, from whom I can see there is no chance of separating you except—heaven forbid!—through your ruin. Marry her, and I’ll strive in your absence to talk down your unhappy father and turn him to approval.

FLORIZEL

How, Camillo,
May this, almost a miracle, be done?
That I may call thee something more than man
And after that trust to thee.

FLORIZEL

How might this near miracle be accomplished, Camillo? If you can do it, I would say you’re something more than a man and would always trust you.

CAMILLO

605Have you thought on
A place whereto you’ll go?

CAMILLO

Have you thought about where you’ll go?

FLORIZEL

Not any yet:
But as the unthought-on accident is guilty
To what we wildly do, so we profess
610Ourselves to be the slaves of chance and flies
Of every wind that blows.

FLORIZEL

Not any place yet. But since an unforeseen accident caused us to take this course of action, we’ll pledge ourselves to fate and go where the wind blows us.