The Winter's Tale

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 4

page Act 4 Scene 4 Page 27

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FLORIZEL

I am bound to you:
There is some sap in this.

FLORIZEL

I owe you for this. There’s life in this plan.

CAMILLO

640A cause more promising
Than a wild dedication of yourselves
To unpath’d waters, undream’d shores, most certain
To miseries enough; no hope to help you,
But as you shake off one to take another;
645Nothing so certain as your anchors, who
Do their best office, if they can but stay you
Where you’ll be loath to be: besides you know
Prosperity’s the very bond of love,
Whose fresh complexion and whose heart together
650Affliction alters.

CAMILLO

It’s a much more promising way of doing things than simply throwing yourself on unmarked waters and strange shores, which will certainly lead you to plenty of misery. There would be no hope to help you aside from casting off one shore to find another. Your anchors would be your only certainty, and the best they can do is hold you in a place you’ll be loath to remain. Besides, you know that good fortune keeps love strong, and that affliction will change the freshness of your affection and the feelings of your heart.

PERDITA

One of these is true:
I think affliction may subdue the cheek,
But not take in the mind.

PERDITA

One of those is true. Affliction may make us less fresh, but it won’t alter our feelings.

CAMILLO

Yea, say you so?
655There shall not at your father’s house these
seven years
Be born another such.

CAMILLO

Do you say so? There won’t be anyone like you born at your father’s house for many years.

FLORIZEL

My good Camillo,
She is as forward of her breeding as
660She is i’ the rear our birth.

FLORIZEL

My good Camillo, she is as superior to her upbringing as she is inferior to our noble rank.