The Winter's Tale

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 4

page Act 4 Scene 4 Page 30

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CAMILLO

Nay, prithee, dispatch: the gentleman is half
flayed already.

CAMILLO

No, please, hurry. The gentleman is already half undressed.

AUTOLYCUS

Are you in earnest, sir?
[Aside]
730I smell the trick on’t.

AUTOLYCUS

Are you serious, sir?
(aside)
I think it’s a trick.

FLORIZEL

Dispatch, I prithee.

FLORIZEL

Hurry, I beg you.

AUTOLYCUS

Indeed, I have had earnest: but I cannot with
conscience take it.

AUTOLYCUS

Indeed, I think it is sincere, but I can’t believe it.

CAMILLO

Unbuckle, unbuckle.

CAMILLO

Unbuckle, unbuckle.
FLORIZEL and AUTOLYCUS exchange garments
Florizel and Autolycus exchange clothing.
735Fortunate mistress,—let my prophecy
Come home to ye!—you must retire yourself
Into some covert: take your sweetheart’s hat
And pluck it o’er your brows, muffle your face,
Dismantle you, and, as you can, disliken
740The truth of your own seeming; that you may—
For I do fear eyes over—to shipboard
Get undescried.
(to Perdita) Lucky mistress—may you be lucky yet! You must take a disguise. Put on your sweetheart’s hat and pull it down over your eyes, wrap up your face, take off your outer garments, and, as much as you can, change your appearance as much as possible. That way I hope you’ll get to the ship without being discovered, for I fear that people are watching for you.

PERDITA

I see the play so lies
That I must bear a part.

PERDITA

I understand that what we’re doing means I have to play a role.

CAMILLO

745No remedy.
Have you done there?

CAMILLO

There’s no helping it. Are you done there?

FLORIZEL

Should I now meet my father,
He would not call me son.

FLORIZEL

If I ran into my father now, he wouldn’t know me as his son.