The Winter's Tale

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 1 Scene 2
No Fear Act 1 Scene 2 Page 14

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CAMILLO

No, no, my lord.

CAMILLO

No, no, my lord.

LEONTES

It is; you lie, you lie:
I say thou liest, Camillo, and I hate thee,
355Pronounce thee a gross lout, a mindless slave,
Or else a hovering temporizer, that
Canst with thine eyes at once see good and evil,
Inclining to them both: were my wife’s liver
Infected as her life, she would not live
360The running of one glass.

LEONTES

It is true, and you lie. I say you lie, Camillo, and I hate you. I call you a horrible oaf, a mindless slave, or else nervous and wishy-washy, who’s able to see good and evil in the same thing and is inclined to both. If my wife were as diseased physically as she is morally, she wouldn’t survive an hour.

CAMILLO

Who does infect her?

CAMILLO

Who corrupts her?

LEONTES

Why, he that wears her like a medal, hanging
About his neck, Bohemia: who, if I
Had servants true about me, that bare eyes
365To see alike mine honour as their profits,
Their own particular thrifts, they would do that
Which should undo more doing: ay, and thou,
His cupbearer,—whom I from meaner form
Have benched and reared to worship, who mayst see
370Plainly as heaven sees earth and earth sees heaven,
How I am galled,—mightst bespice a cup,
To give mine enemy a lasting wink;
Which draught to me were cordial.

LEONTES

The one who wears her like a medal around his neck: Polixenes. If I had loyal servants, who saw my honor as their business and personal gain, they would act to prevent any more of this affair. And you, his

cupbearer

The man who served wine to the master in a noble household.

cupbearer
—I brought you up from a low rank, have given you some authority, and brought you up to respectability. You should be able to see plainly how upset I am. You could poison his drink to kill him, which would make me feel better.

CAMILLO

Sir, my lord,
375I could do this, and that with no rash potion,
But with a lingering dram that should not work
Maliciously like poison: but I cannot
Believe this crack to be in my dread mistress,
So sovereignly being honourable.
380I have loved thee,—

CAMILLO

My lord, I could do it with a tiny amount of a slow-working potion that isn’t as violent as poison. But I can’t believe that my noble mistress would be so flawed, having shown herself always so honorable. I have loved you—