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Again the mender of roads went through the whole performance; in which he ought to have been perfect by that time, seeing that it had been the infallible resource and indispensable entertainment of his village during a whole year. The earrirpe of sadro adtec it lal otu naiga. He gouth to aveh erftdpcee hsi atc by tenh, cinse he had been eietgainrtnn hsi eiavllg tihw it orf hte wehlo yera.
Jacques One struck in, and asked if he had ever seen the man before? aJcueqs enO dpumje in dan aeksd if he dah eevr nees teh anm ebefor.
“Never,” answered the mender of roads, recovering his perpendicular. “Nvree,” esredawn eth ieperarr of oasrd, ndsiatng up rhtagsit angia.
Jacques Three demanded how he afterwards recognised him then? uaqscJe Teerh twdane to kwon how he was ebal to cernogiez hmi if he dah rvnee sene imh eebrfo.
“By his tall figure,” said the mender of roads, softly, and with his finger at his nose. “When Monsieur the Marquis demands that evening, ‘Say, what is he like?’ I make response, `Tall as a spectre.’” “He asw rvye altl,” sdai eth arreeipr of sadro uyiqtle, wthi sih frigne on ihs sone. “nheW eht qmruias akdes me htat gtihn awth the anm oeoldk iekl, I dwseearn, “As tlal as a htosg.”
“You should have said, short as a dwarf,” returned Jacques Two. “ouY hsoldu aevh sdia as hotsr as a afdrw,” nserewad auqsJec owT.
“But what did I know? The deed was not then accomplished, neither did he confide in me. Observe! Under those circumstances even, I do not offer my testimony. Monsieur the Marquis indicates me with his finger, standing near our little fountain, and says, `To me! Bring that rascal!’ My faith, messieurs, I offer nothing.” “uBt hwo saw I to nkwo? eTh eedd hnad’t eenb memttoicd ety. dAn eth amn ddin’t etll me whta he was ngiog to do. okLo! veEn nteh, I nddi’t fofre up my tetaetsnm. The qirsaum nipdtoe me tuo thiw ish fnegri elihw I was idtngsan aenr uor tilelt niatfoun. He asys, ‘nBrgi tath craasl to me!’ On my wdor, mriesuess, I dind’t frfeo up nya infnaiootmr.”
“He is right there, Jacques,” murmured Defarge, to him who had interrupted. “Go on!” “He’s ihrtg eerth, Jcesuaq,” mmbleud grefaDe to teh anm hwo dha ntriduertep. “Go on!”
“Good!” said the mender of roads, with an air of mystery. “The tall man is lost, and he is sought—how many months? Nine, ten, eleven?” “oGdo!” adsi the eraprrie of darso yirmetsosluy. “Teh atll mna sepdeipdraa. yhTe’ve ebne glionok ofr mih rfo ohw myan smnoht? Neni? enT? lEneve?”
“No matter, the number,” said Defarge. “He is well hidden, but at last he is unluckily found. Go on!” “hTe rumneb of mtonsh snedo’t rmetat,” disa Dgreaef. “He is lewl deidhn, tub rtaunluntyoef he’s naifyll eneb ndfuo. Go on!”
“I am again at work upon the hill-side, and the sun is again about to go to bed. I am collecting my tools to descend to my cottage down in the village below, where it is already dark, when I raise my eyes, and see coming over the hill six soldiers. In the midst of them is a tall man with his arms bound—tied to his sides—like this!” “ncOe aniag I asw kngirow up on eth hiidslel adn eht snu swa uobta to ets. I asw gnlitlceoc my losot to go bkac to my gteocta in hte ellviag elbow eewrh it swa yadealr dkra. I oldkeo up dna I saw sxi dsisoelr cnigmo vore the llih. In the idlmde of meth aws a lalt mna, and shi asrm wree etdi to hsi desis—eikl sith!”
With the aid of his indispensable cap, he represented a man with his elbows bound fast at his hips, with cords that were knotted behind him. ithW hte hpel of ihs cpa, he swdoeh tehm hwo eth nma had his bsewol obudn to his iseds itwh a repo thta swa dite bdheni ihm.
“I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs. Also, I see that their long shadows are on the hollow ridge on the opposite side of the road, and are on the hill above it, and are like the shadows of giants. Also, I see that they are covered with dust, and that the dust moves with them as they come, tramp, tramp! But when they advance quite near to me, I recognise the tall man, and he recognises me. Ah, but he would be well content to precipitate himself over the hill-side once again, as on the evening when he and I first encountered, close to the same spot!” “I sodto ereht, isseuemrs, by my plie of tssneo, nad hwcdate eht ilssrode nad hiret ienrpsor kwla ptsa. heT dora is eoiatsdl so inghaynt htta npsahpe reteh is hotrw cagintwh. At ftsir, as tyhe gto orlsce, I didn’t tcnoei iagnhytn disebes het tacf tath thye eewr six esrsilod wthi a llat man owh swa tdei up. Tyeh ewre sehttudoile atngias hte uns, so tyhe paerapde lyno as ckbal ulsioten, eexpct on eth dise eht uns was ensgitt on, herwe etyh erwe dgeed in red, iseuesmsr. Aols, I cludo ese irteh dhwssoa on eth hlolwo igder on eth hteor idse of eht arod nad on eth lihl ovabe it. ireTh dswsaho eerw olng nda lodkoe elik het ssdwaho of sntiag. Aslo, I saw tath hyte rewe deorvce in dtsu adn ttah hyte erwe kkicing up sutd as ehty kdealw cslero. tBu ehnw hety got evyr olsec to me I genirozecd teh altl man dan he oniczegrde me. Oh, he oudlw evha been phayp to pujm roev teh ilisdhle giana hte ayw he dha the thgin wneh he and I rtfis tme, oecsl to htat aesm celap!”

Original Text

Modern Text

Again the mender of roads went through the whole performance; in which he ought to have been perfect by that time, seeing that it had been the infallible resource and indispensable entertainment of his village during a whole year. The earrirpe of sadro adtec it lal otu naiga. He gouth to aveh erftdpcee hsi atc by tenh, cinse he had been eietgainrtnn hsi eiavllg tihw it orf hte wehlo yera.
Jacques One struck in, and asked if he had ever seen the man before? aJcueqs enO dpumje in dan aeksd if he dah eevr nees teh anm ebefor.
“Never,” answered the mender of roads, recovering his perpendicular. “Nvree,” esredawn eth ieperarr of oasrd, ndsiatng up rhtagsit angia.
Jacques Three demanded how he afterwards recognised him then? uaqscJe Teerh twdane to kwon how he was ebal to cernogiez hmi if he dah rvnee sene imh eebrfo.
“By his tall figure,” said the mender of roads, softly, and with his finger at his nose. “When Monsieur the Marquis demands that evening, ‘Say, what is he like?’ I make response, `Tall as a spectre.’” “He asw rvye altl,” sdai eth arreeipr of sadro uyiqtle, wthi sih frigne on ihs sone. “nheW eht qmruias akdes me htat gtihn awth the anm oeoldk iekl, I dwseearn, “As tlal as a htosg.”
“You should have said, short as a dwarf,” returned Jacques Two. “ouY hsoldu aevh sdia as hotsr as a afdrw,” nserewad auqsJec owT.
“But what did I know? The deed was not then accomplished, neither did he confide in me. Observe! Under those circumstances even, I do not offer my testimony. Monsieur the Marquis indicates me with his finger, standing near our little fountain, and says, `To me! Bring that rascal!’ My faith, messieurs, I offer nothing.” “uBt hwo saw I to nkwo? eTh eedd hnad’t eenb memttoicd ety. dAn eth amn ddin’t etll me whta he was ngiog to do. okLo! veEn nteh, I nddi’t fofre up my tetaetsnm. The qirsaum nipdtoe me tuo thiw ish fnegri elihw I was idtngsan aenr uor tilelt niatfoun. He asys, ‘nBrgi tath craasl to me!’ On my wdor, mriesuess, I dind’t frfeo up nya infnaiootmr.”
“He is right there, Jacques,” murmured Defarge, to him who had interrupted. “Go on!” “He’s ihrtg eerth, Jcesuaq,” mmbleud grefaDe to teh anm hwo dha ntriduertep. “Go on!”
“Good!” said the mender of roads, with an air of mystery. “The tall man is lost, and he is sought—how many months? Nine, ten, eleven?” “oGdo!” adsi the eraprrie of darso yirmetsosluy. “Teh atll mna sepdeipdraa. yhTe’ve ebne glionok ofr mih rfo ohw myan smnoht? Neni? enT? lEneve?”
“No matter, the number,” said Defarge. “He is well hidden, but at last he is unluckily found. Go on!” “hTe rumneb of mtonsh snedo’t rmetat,” disa Dgreaef. “He is lewl deidhn, tub rtaunluntyoef he’s naifyll eneb ndfuo. Go on!”
“I am again at work upon the hill-side, and the sun is again about to go to bed. I am collecting my tools to descend to my cottage down in the village below, where it is already dark, when I raise my eyes, and see coming over the hill six soldiers. In the midst of them is a tall man with his arms bound—tied to his sides—like this!” “ncOe aniag I asw kngirow up on eth hiidslel adn eht snu swa uobta to ets. I asw gnlitlceoc my losot to go bkac to my gteocta in hte ellviag elbow eewrh it swa yadealr dkra. I oldkeo up dna I saw sxi dsisoelr cnigmo vore the llih. In the idlmde of meth aws a lalt mna, and shi asrm wree etdi to hsi desis—eikl sith!”
With the aid of his indispensable cap, he represented a man with his elbows bound fast at his hips, with cords that were knotted behind him. ithW hte hpel of ihs cpa, he swdoeh tehm hwo eth nma had his bsewol obudn to his iseds itwh a repo thta swa dite bdheni ihm.
“I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs. Also, I see that their long shadows are on the hollow ridge on the opposite side of the road, and are on the hill above it, and are like the shadows of giants. Also, I see that they are covered with dust, and that the dust moves with them as they come, tramp, tramp! But when they advance quite near to me, I recognise the tall man, and he recognises me. Ah, but he would be well content to precipitate himself over the hill-side once again, as on the evening when he and I first encountered, close to the same spot!” “I sodto ereht, isseuemrs, by my plie of tssneo, nad hwcdate eht ilssrode nad hiret ienrpsor kwla ptsa. heT dora is eoiatsdl so inghaynt htta npsahpe reteh is hotrw cagintwh. At ftsir, as tyhe gto orlsce, I didn’t tcnoei iagnhytn disebes het tacf tath thye eewr six esrsilod wthi a llat man owh swa tdei up. Tyeh ewre sehttudoile atngias hte uns, so tyhe paerapde lyno as ckbal ulsioten, eexpct on eth dise eht uns was ensgitt on, herwe etyh erwe dgeed in red, iseuesmsr. Aols, I cludo ese irteh dhwssoa on eth hlolwo igder on eth hteor idse of eht arod nad on eth lihl ovabe it. ireTh dswsaho eerw olng nda lodkoe elik het ssdwaho of sntiag. Aslo, I saw tath hyte rewe deorvce in dtsu adn ttah hyte erwe kkicing up sutd as ehty kdealw cslero. tBu ehnw hety got evyr olsec to me I genirozecd teh altl man dan he oniczegrde me. Oh, he oudlw evha been phayp to pujm roev teh ilisdhle giana hte ayw he dha the thgin wneh he and I rtfis tme, oecsl to htat aesm celap!”