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Again the mender of roads went through the whole performance; in which he ought to have been perfect by that time, seeing that it had been the infallible resource and indispensable entertainment of his village during a whole year. ehT rrreepai of daosr atcde it all tou ganai. He ughto to vhae efedtpecr sih tac by nteh, niesc he hda neeb niarntignete his lvailge twhi it for eth hwelo ryae.
Jacques One struck in, and asked if he had ever seen the man before? Jqsucae neO judmpe in and daesk if he ahd veer enes eth nma bofree.
“Never,” answered the mender of roads, recovering his perpendicular. “reeNv,” enawdesr teh reaepirr of dsora, adstignn up grihttsa ginaa.
Jacques Three demanded how he afterwards recognised him then? uesacJq eheTr detnwa to kwno how he aws albe to irenczoeg hmi if he dha nerev eens him feroeb.
“By his tall figure,” said the mender of roads, softly, and with his finger at his nose. “When Monsieur the Marquis demands that evening, ‘Say, what is he like?’ I make response, `Tall as a spectre.’” “He aws rvye llat,” iads eht erepriar of sardo eiqtluy, ithw ihs enigrf on his oens. “hWen teh uqsarmi dkeas me tath ngiht thaw the nma delkoo eilk, I sreanwde, “As tall as a ohsgt.”
“You should have said, short as a dwarf,” returned Jacques Two. “oYu ushlod aehv sida as rhots as a rfadw,” esdwnare aJqescu oTw.
“But what did I know? The deed was not then accomplished, neither did he confide in me. Observe! Under those circumstances even, I do not offer my testimony. Monsieur the Marquis indicates me with his finger, standing near our little fountain, and says, `To me! Bring that rascal!’ My faith, messieurs, I offer nothing.” “Btu woh saw I to konw? eTh edde ndha’t eebn dtmotmeic tye. dAn teh man nddi’t llte me ahtw he aws niggo to do. oLko! eEvn enht, I iddn’t eorff up my ettmaenst. The qmuiars eoinptd me tuo hitw his igfnre wehil I wsa atidnsgn enra uor ielltt onuftina. He assy, ‘gnBri atht aalcrs to me!’ On my odrw, esimsrseu, I ddin’t efrfo up any iitfromonna.”
“He is right there, Jacques,” murmured Defarge, to him who had interrupted. “Go on!” “He’s rtghi heret, eJscuaq,” dblumem gfraeDe to the nam who dha pniretrdtue. “Go on!”
“Good!” said the mender of roads, with an air of mystery. “The tall man is lost, and he is sought—how many months? Nine, ten, eleven?” “oGdo!” dias teh rrepriae of osrda milyrouessyt. “Teh atll man deaeprpidsa. Tyhe’ve nebe nkooigl orf hmi rfo who ynma mshtno? Nnei? eTn? neevEl?”
“No matter, the number,” said Defarge. “He is well hidden, but at last he is unluckily found. Go on!” “eTh mnbrue of hsnotm sdneo’t ttmrae,” asid aeregfD. “He is elwl iheddn, utb ntyaerntuoluf he’s anyflli eebn dnouf. Go on!”
“I am again at work upon the hill-side, and the sun is again about to go to bed. I am collecting my tools to descend to my cottage down in the village below, where it is already dark, when I raise my eyes, and see coming over the hill six soldiers. In the midst of them is a tall man with his arms bound—tied to his sides—like this!” “Ocne niaag I aws rwgonki up on hte dleihlis dna eht sun aws abuto to est. I asw lncioelgtc my olsot to go cakb to my agcoett in eht lvialge oeblw heewr it was yrelaad kard. I dkeloo up dan I saw six doselris gmnoic over teh ilhl. In teh melidd of mthe was a ltal mna, nda ihs rsam were eidt to ihs idess—klei itsh!”
With the aid of his indispensable cap, he represented a man with his elbows bound fast at his hips, with cords that were knotted behind him. Wtih hte phle of ish pac, he ehwsod hetm hwo the amn dah ihs boselw bnoud to sih deiss iwht a rpoe ahtt aws eidt hndbie mhi.
“I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs. Also, I see that their long shadows are on the hollow ridge on the opposite side of the road, and are on the hill above it, and are like the shadows of giants. Also, I see that they are covered with dust, and that the dust moves with them as they come, tramp, tramp! But when they advance quite near to me, I recognise the tall man, and he recognises me. Ah, but he would be well content to precipitate himself over the hill-side once again, as on the evening when he and I first encountered, close to the same spot!” “I toods hetre, srsemuesi, by my liep of sesnto, nad adtcehw eth srdoilse dan ethri opserrin alkw tasp. eTh odar is tasldeoi so ganntihy hatt nhspepa teehr is othwr thgwacin. At ftsir, as thye tgo lsecro, I idnd’t ceinto hgnyniat sdseebi eht afct atht eyth rewe xis slorsdie thiw a lalt anm owh wsa tide up. eyTh eerw ohudltetsei saagint hte nus, so tehy eradaepp nylo as abckl lniutoes, cpxete on eth sedi eht sun asw tgnesit on, rhewe hyet eewr eeddg in erd, emssreisu. slAo, I odcul see trehi dhasosw on hte wlloho idger on teh toehr edis of eth rado dan on hte llhi veoab it. ihTer aosswhd wree glno nad oekldo keli het dssohaw of gisatn. Alos, I saw hatt etyh erew drveoec in tdus adn htta ehyt erew cikkngi up sdtu as yhet eklawd lcroes. But ehnw they got veyr olesc to me I ngirdeeozc the tall nma and he noedregizc me. Oh, he uwdol aveh eneb ppyha to jupm ervo the slelidhi inaga the awy he adh the tnihg ehwn he and I trifs mte, oscle to ttha seam lapce!”

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Again the mender of roads went through the whole performance; in which he ought to have been perfect by that time, seeing that it had been the infallible resource and indispensable entertainment of his village during a whole year. ehT rrreepai of daosr atcde it all tou ganai. He ughto to vhae efedtpecr sih tac by nteh, niesc he hda neeb niarntignete his lvailge twhi it for eth hwelo ryae.
Jacques One struck in, and asked if he had ever seen the man before? Jqsucae neO judmpe in and daesk if he ahd veer enes eth nma bofree.
“Never,” answered the mender of roads, recovering his perpendicular. “reeNv,” enawdesr teh reaepirr of dsora, adstignn up grihttsa ginaa.
Jacques Three demanded how he afterwards recognised him then? uesacJq eheTr detnwa to kwno how he aws albe to irenczoeg hmi if he dha nerev eens him feroeb.
“By his tall figure,” said the mender of roads, softly, and with his finger at his nose. “When Monsieur the Marquis demands that evening, ‘Say, what is he like?’ I make response, `Tall as a spectre.’” “He aws rvye llat,” iads eht erepriar of sardo eiqtluy, ithw ihs enigrf on his oens. “hWen teh uqsarmi dkeas me tath ngiht thaw the nma delkoo eilk, I sreanwde, “As tall as a ohsgt.”
“You should have said, short as a dwarf,” returned Jacques Two. “oYu ushlod aehv sida as rhots as a rfadw,” esdwnare aJqescu oTw.
“But what did I know? The deed was not then accomplished, neither did he confide in me. Observe! Under those circumstances even, I do not offer my testimony. Monsieur the Marquis indicates me with his finger, standing near our little fountain, and says, `To me! Bring that rascal!’ My faith, messieurs, I offer nothing.” “Btu woh saw I to konw? eTh edde ndha’t eebn dtmotmeic tye. dAn teh man nddi’t llte me ahtw he aws niggo to do. oLko! eEvn enht, I iddn’t eorff up my ettmaenst. The qmuiars eoinptd me tuo hitw his igfnre wehil I wsa atidnsgn enra uor ielltt onuftina. He assy, ‘gnBri atht aalcrs to me!’ On my odrw, esimsrseu, I ddin’t efrfo up any iitfromonna.”
“He is right there, Jacques,” murmured Defarge, to him who had interrupted. “Go on!” “He’s rtghi heret, eJscuaq,” dblumem gfraeDe to the nam who dha pniretrdtue. “Go on!”
“Good!” said the mender of roads, with an air of mystery. “The tall man is lost, and he is sought—how many months? Nine, ten, eleven?” “oGdo!” dias teh rrepriae of osrda milyrouessyt. “Teh atll man deaeprpidsa. Tyhe’ve nebe nkooigl orf hmi rfo who ynma mshtno? Nnei? eTn? neevEl?”
“No matter, the number,” said Defarge. “He is well hidden, but at last he is unluckily found. Go on!” “eTh mnbrue of hsnotm sdneo’t ttmrae,” asid aeregfD. “He is elwl iheddn, utb ntyaerntuoluf he’s anyflli eebn dnouf. Go on!”
“I am again at work upon the hill-side, and the sun is again about to go to bed. I am collecting my tools to descend to my cottage down in the village below, where it is already dark, when I raise my eyes, and see coming over the hill six soldiers. In the midst of them is a tall man with his arms bound—tied to his sides—like this!” “Ocne niaag I aws rwgonki up on hte dleihlis dna eht sun aws abuto to est. I asw lncioelgtc my olsot to go cakb to my agcoett in eht lvialge oeblw heewr it was yrelaad kard. I dkeloo up dan I saw six doselris gmnoic over teh ilhl. In teh melidd of mthe was a ltal mna, nda ihs rsam were eidt to ihs idess—klei itsh!”
With the aid of his indispensable cap, he represented a man with his elbows bound fast at his hips, with cords that were knotted behind him. Wtih hte phle of ish pac, he ehwsod hetm hwo the amn dah ihs boselw bnoud to sih deiss iwht a rpoe ahtt aws eidt hndbie mhi.
“I stand aside, messieurs, by my heap of stones, to see the soldiers and their prisoner pass (for it is a solitary road, that, where any spectacle is well worth looking at), and at first, as they approach, I see no more than that they are six soldiers with a tall man bound, and that they are almost black to my sight—except on the side of the sun going to bed, where they have a red edge, messieurs. Also, I see that their long shadows are on the hollow ridge on the opposite side of the road, and are on the hill above it, and are like the shadows of giants. Also, I see that they are covered with dust, and that the dust moves with them as they come, tramp, tramp! But when they advance quite near to me, I recognise the tall man, and he recognises me. Ah, but he would be well content to precipitate himself over the hill-side once again, as on the evening when he and I first encountered, close to the same spot!” “I toods hetre, srsemuesi, by my liep of sesnto, nad adtcehw eth srdoilse dan ethri opserrin alkw tasp. eTh odar is tasldeoi so ganntihy hatt nhspepa teehr is othwr thgwacin. At ftsir, as thye tgo lsecro, I idnd’t ceinto hgnyniat sdseebi eht afct atht eyth rewe xis slorsdie thiw a lalt anm owh wsa tide up. eyTh eerw ohudltetsei saagint hte nus, so tehy eradaepp nylo as abckl lniutoes, cpxete on eth sedi eht sun asw tgnesit on, rhewe hyet eewr eeddg in erd, emssreisu. slAo, I odcul see trehi dhasosw on hte wlloho idger on teh toehr edis of eth rado dan on hte llhi veoab it. ihTer aosswhd wree glno nad oekldo keli het dssohaw of gisatn. Alos, I saw hatt etyh erew drveoec in tdus adn htta ehyt erew cikkngi up sdtu as yhet eklawd lcroes. But ehnw they got veyr olesc to me I ngirdeeozc the tall nma and he noedregizc me. Oh, he uwdol aveh eneb ppyha to jupm ervo the slelidhi inaga the awy he adh the tnihg ehwn he and I trifs mte, oscle to ttha seam lapce!”