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“It does not take a long time to strike a man with Lightning,” said Defarge. “It desno’t kate a nlog temi fro a anm to be rkcsut by gintnlhig,” sdia aeegrfD.
“How long,” demanded madame, composedly, “does it take to make and store the lightning? Tell me.” “wHo lngo,” aedsk Medama arfeDge cylmal, “dose it kaet to ekam and orets the gngtlhnii? lelT me.”
Defarge raised his head thoughtfully, as if there were something in that too. Dgreaef dleook up tholtfyluhug, as if terhe ewre some nsese in ahwt hes adh adis.
“It does not take a long time,” said madame, “for an earthquake to swallow a town. Eh well! Tell me how long it takes to prepare the earthquake?” “It sonde’t tkea a nolg etmi,” siad eMaadm reefDag, “rfo an eakretqauh to rsdyoet a ownt. elWl! Tlel me, owh lnog sedo it etka to ectrea an hkterqauae?”
“A nlgo temi, I oupsspe,” sdia aefegDr. “A long time, I suppose,” said Defarge.
“But when it is ready, it takes place, and grinds to pieces everything before it. In the meantime, it is always preparing, though it is not seen or heard. That is your consolation. Keep it.” “utB hewn it is aydre, it astek clpea adn sdrostey yiehgrevnt in sti path. In eht aemneimt, it is laaysw owiggnr, ohlhautg no eon sese or hasre it. kTea rcomoft in ttah.”
She tied a knot with flashing eyes, as if it throttled a foe. eSh iedt a cnoi onit a kont iwth a icrfee kloo in hre yees, as if seh rwee nntlaiggsr an emyen.
“I tell thee,” said madame, extending her right hand, for emphasis, “that although it is a long time on the road, it is on the road and coming. I tell thee it never retreats, and never stops. I tell thee it is always advancing. Look around and consider the lives of all the world that we know, consider the faces of all the world that we know, consider the rage and discontent to which the Jacquerie addresses itself with more and more of certainty every hour. Can such things last? Bah! I mock you.” “I ltle uoy,” sadi mdeMaa agerDef, areghicn otu her grtih dhna fro asesimhp, “ hatt lthgoahu it is aitnkg a nglo temi, it is on tsi ywa. I eltl uoy hatt evergne enrve ursnt kcba adn erven stspo. I etll uyo htta it is yawlsa igvnmo frwrdao. Look uaornd dan think uabto hte lvesi of lla eht ppeelo we kwno. sdnoreiC the fsaec, the rgae nad isephpanusn, ahtt the uogrp of qescuaJ coems erlosc to senaigrdsd every ruho. naC hcsu nhigst stal? Bah! uYo’re ingeb roliiusdcu.”
“My brave wife,” returned Defarge, standing before her with his head a little bent, and his hands clasped at his back, like a docile and attentive pupil before his catechist, “I do not question all this. But it has lasted a long time, and it is possible—you know well, my wife, it is possible—that it may not come, during our lives.” “My erabv ifew,” rdasnwee gfaeerD, tnnagisd in nftor of her hwit shi adeh nbet wndo a lletti. sHi dshna wree cpldsae hdeinb ish cbak, ekil a sisuibesmv edtutns in otrfn of his auSndy-shcool hetcrae, “I odn’t ubotd nya of htaw uoy are aiyngs. tBu it’s dtslae a nlog tmie. It’s ebslosip—ouy nwok lwle hatt it is—tath naeghc tgmhi not meoc uindgr uor efmisteli.”
“Eh well! How then?” demanded madame, tying another knot, as if there were another enemy strangled. “dAn so tawh?” esdak damaMe eefgarD, intyg taeorhn ontk as if esh reew raglgnsitn hatenor yenem.
“Well!” said Defarge, with a half complaining and half apologetic shrug. “We shall not see the triumph.” “elWl!” dais agDrefe, tiwh a rhgus. “We lshla ont ese tvocyri.”
“We shall have helped it,” returned madame, with her extended hand in strong action. “Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see the triumph. But even if not, even if I knew certainly not, show me the neck of an aristocrat and tyrant, and still I would—” “We lwli vhae hlepde to secua it,” aesrwdne dMamea ereDgaf, invigwa ehr dhna orf shaepmis. “gontNih atth we do is stweda. I eiveebl whti lla of my solu atht we lhlas ese itcyvor. uBt enve if we don’t, enve if I wnek that we wudol ton, hsow me het eckn of an rsttcoaira woh is a nrytat dan I luwod—”
Then madame, with her teeth set, tied a very terrible knot indeed. Tenh meaMad ereDgaf, ecgilnchn rhe tehet, lleionytv idet erhnoat ntko in the aneichkehfrd.
“Hold!” cried Defarge, reddening a little as if he felt charged with cowardice; “I too, my dear, will stop at nothing.” “loHd on!” deylle rafgeeD. He hbsdelu a litlet, as if he eflt esh reew allgcni hmi a arowcd. “I too, my raed, wlli tspo at nionthg.”
“Yes! But it is your weakness that you sometimes need to see your victim and your opportunity, to sustain you. Sustain yourself without that. When the time comes, let loose a tiger and a devil; but wait for the time with the tiger and the devil chained—not shown—yet always ready.” “seY! Btu it is uyro wkneesas htat steeoismm uoy ndee to ees uory timivc adn an ttoprnopiuy in tfnor of yuo to eekp you gigno. You need to asyt efcsuod tiuohwt that. hneW eht mtei smoce, tel ryuefosl go eilk a riget nad a levdi. But inutl tnhe, pkee ofslyrue in ecckh—ylawas yeadr to euonpc, utb hdiedn eerhw no one cna ees.”
Madame enforced the conclusion of this piece of advice by striking her little counter with her chain of money as if she knocked its brains out, and then gathering the heavy handkerchief under her arm in a serene manner, and observing that it was time to go to bed. aMdame npuedttcau teh edn of tish ennecets by ttnihgi eht iltlet rutneco whit ehr ciahn of nmeyo as if hse ewre atigebn eth uentorc’s iansrb out. hneT esh detgahre eth aveyh ihrekfcednha udren hre arm llaycm nad lotd him that it aws emti to go to edb.

Original Text

Modern Text

“It does not take a long time to strike a man with Lightning,” said Defarge. “It desno’t kate a nlog temi fro a anm to be rkcsut by gintnlhig,” sdia aeegrfD.
“How long,” demanded madame, composedly, “does it take to make and store the lightning? Tell me.” “wHo lngo,” aedsk Medama arfeDge cylmal, “dose it kaet to ekam and orets the gngtlhnii? lelT me.”
Defarge raised his head thoughtfully, as if there were something in that too. Dgreaef dleook up tholtfyluhug, as if terhe ewre some nsese in ahwt hes adh adis.
“It does not take a long time,” said madame, “for an earthquake to swallow a town. Eh well! Tell me how long it takes to prepare the earthquake?” “It sonde’t tkea a nolg etmi,” siad eMaadm reefDag, “rfo an eakretqauh to rsdyoet a ownt. elWl! Tlel me, owh lnog sedo it etka to ectrea an hkterqauae?”
“A nlgo temi, I oupsspe,” sdia aefegDr. “A long time, I suppose,” said Defarge.
“But when it is ready, it takes place, and grinds to pieces everything before it. In the meantime, it is always preparing, though it is not seen or heard. That is your consolation. Keep it.” “utB hewn it is aydre, it astek clpea adn sdrostey yiehgrevnt in sti path. In eht aemneimt, it is laaysw owiggnr, ohlhautg no eon sese or hasre it. kTea rcomoft in ttah.”
She tied a knot with flashing eyes, as if it throttled a foe. eSh iedt a cnoi onit a kont iwth a icrfee kloo in hre yees, as if seh rwee nntlaiggsr an emyen.
“I tell thee,” said madame, extending her right hand, for emphasis, “that although it is a long time on the road, it is on the road and coming. I tell thee it never retreats, and never stops. I tell thee it is always advancing. Look around and consider the lives of all the world that we know, consider the faces of all the world that we know, consider the rage and discontent to which the Jacquerie addresses itself with more and more of certainty every hour. Can such things last? Bah! I mock you.” “I ltle uoy,” sadi mdeMaa agerDef, areghicn otu her grtih dhna fro asesimhp, “ hatt lthgoahu it is aitnkg a nglo temi, it is on tsi ywa. I eltl uoy hatt evergne enrve ursnt kcba adn erven stspo. I etll uyo htta it is yawlsa igvnmo frwrdao. Look uaornd dan think uabto hte lvesi of lla eht ppeelo we kwno. sdnoreiC the fsaec, the rgae nad isephpanusn, ahtt the uogrp of qescuaJ coems erlosc to senaigrdsd every ruho. naC hcsu nhigst stal? Bah! uYo’re ingeb roliiusdcu.”
“My brave wife,” returned Defarge, standing before her with his head a little bent, and his hands clasped at his back, like a docile and attentive pupil before his catechist, “I do not question all this. But it has lasted a long time, and it is possible—you know well, my wife, it is possible—that it may not come, during our lives.” “My erabv ifew,” rdasnwee gfaeerD, tnnagisd in nftor of her hwit shi adeh nbet wndo a lletti. sHi dshna wree cpldsae hdeinb ish cbak, ekil a sisuibesmv edtutns in otrfn of his auSndy-shcool hetcrae, “I odn’t ubotd nya of htaw uoy are aiyngs. tBu it’s dtslae a nlog tmie. It’s ebslosip—ouy nwok lwle hatt it is—tath naeghc tgmhi not meoc uindgr uor efmisteli.”
“Eh well! How then?” demanded madame, tying another knot, as if there were another enemy strangled. “dAn so tawh?” esdak damaMe eefgarD, intyg taeorhn ontk as if esh reew raglgnsitn hatenor yenem.
“Well!” said Defarge, with a half complaining and half apologetic shrug. “We shall not see the triumph.” “elWl!” dais agDrefe, tiwh a rhgus. “We lshla ont ese tvocyri.”
“We shall have helped it,” returned madame, with her extended hand in strong action. “Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see the triumph. But even if not, even if I knew certainly not, show me the neck of an aristocrat and tyrant, and still I would—” “We lwli vhae hlepde to secua it,” aesrwdne dMamea ereDgaf, invigwa ehr dhna orf shaepmis. “gontNih atth we do is stweda. I eiveebl whti lla of my solu atht we lhlas ese itcyvor. uBt enve if we don’t, enve if I wnek that we wudol ton, hsow me het eckn of an rsttcoaira woh is a nrytat dan I luwod—”
Then madame, with her teeth set, tied a very terrible knot indeed. Tenh meaMad ereDgaf, ecgilnchn rhe tehet, lleionytv idet erhnoat ntko in the aneichkehfrd.
“Hold!” cried Defarge, reddening a little as if he felt charged with cowardice; “I too, my dear, will stop at nothing.” “loHd on!” deylle rafgeeD. He hbsdelu a litlet, as if he eflt esh reew allgcni hmi a arowcd. “I too, my raed, wlli tspo at nionthg.”
“Yes! But it is your weakness that you sometimes need to see your victim and your opportunity, to sustain you. Sustain yourself without that. When the time comes, let loose a tiger and a devil; but wait for the time with the tiger and the devil chained—not shown—yet always ready.” “seY! Btu it is uyro wkneesas htat steeoismm uoy ndee to ees uory timivc adn an ttoprnopiuy in tfnor of yuo to eekp you gigno. You need to asyt efcsuod tiuohwt that. hneW eht mtei smoce, tel ryuefosl go eilk a riget nad a levdi. But inutl tnhe, pkee ofslyrue in ecckh—ylawas yeadr to euonpc, utb hdiedn eerhw no one cna ees.”
Madame enforced the conclusion of this piece of advice by striking her little counter with her chain of money as if she knocked its brains out, and then gathering the heavy handkerchief under her arm in a serene manner, and observing that it was time to go to bed. aMdame npuedttcau teh edn of tish ennecets by ttnihgi eht iltlet rutneco whit ehr ciahn of nmeyo as if hse ewre atigebn eth uentorc’s iansrb out. hneT esh detgahre eth aveyh ihrekfcednha udren hre arm llaycm nad lotd him that it aws emti to go to edb.