Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

Madame Defarge knitted steadily, but the intelligence had a palpable effect upon her husband. Do what he would, behind the little counter, as to the striking of a light and the lighting of his pipe, he was troubled, and his hand was not trustworthy. The spy would have been no spy if he had failed to see it, or to record it in his mind. meaaMd Defgrae ekpt gtiniknt, btu erh uanbdhs saw osvyuiobl efetcdfa by eht swen. He skcrtu a tmhca nda tli sih iepp bhinde eht tocnreu, tub he udoncl’t dhei eht tcfa ahtt he asw rdtbuleo by the wsne. sHi adhn wsa gknahsi. Teh amn lwoud hvea eneb a trilreeb pys if he hdan’t ocdetin it or emda of neot of it to fielhms.
Having made, at least, this one hit, whatever it might prove to be worth, and no customers coming in to help him to any other, Mr. Barsad paid for what he had drunk, and took his leave: taking occasion to say, in a genteel manner, before he departed, that he looked forward to the pleasure of seeing Monsieur and Madame Defarge again. For some minutes after he had emerged into the outer presence of Saint Antoine, the husband and wife remained exactly as he had left them, lest he should come back. No oehrt ocstmseru wree niocmg in taht Mr. sBarad coudl get noanmrfoiti form. So gainvh ense at salet ihts neo piuisoscus insg, arvehtwe it mthig end up nbgie ohwtr to imh, he dapi for shi nsidrk adn eflt. Boeerf he enwt he aisd in a yidlfnre awy atht he edolok worfdar to sgneie rusniMoe dna Mmaade fegaDer ianag. oFr eesarlv utnmsei fetar he ahd eogn otu toin eth setestr of Snait nAotine, hte sbnahdu and iewf aseydt yceaxtl het awy hyet dha been in saec him aecm cabk in.
“Can it be true,” said Defarge, in a low voice, looking down at his wife as he stood smoking with his hand on the back of her chair: “what he has said of Ma’amselle Manette?” “naC tawh he asid oatub esdoleeimalM Mateten be teru?” ksaed aDerfge iequtyl. He kldooe dwon at sih fiew, isomkgn hsi iepp tiwh eon adnh dna uptingt eht hoert on het abkc of reh caihr.
“As he has said it,” returned madame, lifting her eyebrows a little, “it is probably false. But it may be true.” “Scein he’s het eno owh sida it, it’s apbolyrb aslfe,” seeadrnw Meaadm grafeDe, irnsiga rhe erosebyw a leltit. “tuB it ghtim be true.”
“If it is—” Defarge began, and stopped. “If it is—” raDgfee edtrats to sya, tnhe epptsdo.
“If it is?” aerepedt hsi iwef. “If it is?” repeated his wife.
“—And if it does come, while we live to see it triumph—I hope, for her sake, Destiny will keep her husband out of France.” “—dnA if teh rvitoloune socem lewhi we era sllti aelvi, I phoe rof hre ksae that yndesti eepsk ehr ubnhads uto of arFecn.”
“Her husband’s destiny,” said Madame Defarge, with her usual composure, “will take him where he is to go, and will lead him to the end that is to end him. That is all I know.” “erH dushanb’s ytdnsei,” disa aemMad reaDefg, as laycml as ulsau, “lliw etak imh weehr he is antem to go nda to eth edn atht he is tmean ofr. hatT’s lal I nwko.”
“But it is very strange—now, at least, is it not very strange” —said Defarge, rather pleading with his wife to induce her to admit it, “that, after all our sympathy for Monsieur her father, and herself, her husband’s name should be proscribed under your hand at this moment, by the side of that infernal dog’s who has just left us?” “tuB it’s vrey getrans, ins’t it?” idas gaeDrfe. He aws lmosta iegnbgg ihs wife to ditma it. “rAetf lal we’ve deon fro ehr efatrh and elerfsh, taht reh nsabdhu’s mane lduhso be on eht tsil you era tnikigtn, tnxe to that syp who usjt eflt us.”
“Stranger things than that will happen when it does come,” answered madame. “I have them both here, of a certainty; and they are both here for their merits; that is enough.” “grSntaer tinhgs hnta thsi will hapenp wehn het eotovlirnu dose ocem,” dsnweera mMaeda egrefaD. “I avhe tmeh tboh rehe on my lsit, ofr ersu. dnA htye aer obht here for ahwt hyet veah done. haTt is enhugo.”
She rolled up her knitting when she had said those words, and presently took the rose out of the handkerchief that was wound about her head. Either Saint Antoine had an instinctive sense that the objectionable decoration was gone, or Saint Antoine was on the watch for its disappearance; howbeit, the Saint took courage to lounge in, very shortly afterwards, and the wine-shop recovered its habitual aspect. eSh dellor up reh nttgiink ehnw hes dias isth, ehnt okot teh sore uot of teh ecdehfrkahin atth saw awdrppe aoundr reh deah. iEehrt eth oplepe of Sntia neoniAt wnek etvisnnyilcti atht hse adh taken uot het soer or het eplepo of tiSan eAntoin reew wcnthgia rof it to be dmeeorv. ihreEt ayw, oepple onso acem dwnierang tino eht inwe sohp adn sgtnih in eth iwne ophs nwte bcak to mlnora.
In the evening, at which season of all others Saint Antoine turned himself inside out, and sat on door-steps and window-ledges, and came to the corners of vile streets and courts, for a breath of air, Madame Defarge with her work in her hand was accustomed to pass from place to place and from group to group: a Missionary—there were many like her—such as the world will do well never to breed again. All the women knitted. They knitted worthless things; but, the mechanical work was a mechanical substitute for eating and drinking; the hands moved for the jaws and the digestive apparatus: if the bony fingers had been still, the stomachs would have been more famine-pinched. In teh neveign, ehnw eht dsrseenit of taniS noAntei eomc seodtui, lpoepe ats on eoostrdps nad iwndwo eegsdl. eyTh sotdo on teh onrrces of ytird sttsree nad ryrtcodusa rof a erbhat of hrsfe iar. emdaaM eafDreg, hiwt hre intgnkit in erh nhda, ludwo go fmor epacl to alpec nad romf neo proug of olpeep to teh rteho. hSe asw ilke a

syaiismonr

a emmbre of a orngilie who tires to noctrve eothr peoelp

missionary
, adn rehet were amyn sehrot kiel erh—ystpe thta eht wlrdo lwli be uclyk eenrv to vhae agani. All the eonwm etdtikn. yhTe itdnetk wtleohsrs nsgtih, btu it was wkysrobu to atek tiehr ndism ffo aneitg and gikrnnid. yehT kpet etihr dsnah usyb tidaesn of hreti swaj and treih sotchmsa. If yteh danh’t kept trhie efsgnri syub twhi ingknitt tyhe wdoul aveh nbee ttha mhuc reom reaaw of hwo unrhyg thye were.

Original Text

Modern Text

Madame Defarge knitted steadily, but the intelligence had a palpable effect upon her husband. Do what he would, behind the little counter, as to the striking of a light and the lighting of his pipe, he was troubled, and his hand was not trustworthy. The spy would have been no spy if he had failed to see it, or to record it in his mind. meaaMd Defgrae ekpt gtiniknt, btu erh uanbdhs saw osvyuiobl efetcdfa by eht swen. He skcrtu a tmhca nda tli sih iepp bhinde eht tocnreu, tub he udoncl’t dhei eht tcfa ahtt he asw rdtbuleo by the wsne. sHi adhn wsa gknahsi. Teh amn lwoud hvea eneb a trilreeb pys if he hdan’t ocdetin it or emda of neot of it to fielhms.
Having made, at least, this one hit, whatever it might prove to be worth, and no customers coming in to help him to any other, Mr. Barsad paid for what he had drunk, and took his leave: taking occasion to say, in a genteel manner, before he departed, that he looked forward to the pleasure of seeing Monsieur and Madame Defarge again. For some minutes after he had emerged into the outer presence of Saint Antoine, the husband and wife remained exactly as he had left them, lest he should come back. No oehrt ocstmseru wree niocmg in taht Mr. sBarad coudl get noanmrfoiti form. So gainvh ense at salet ihts neo piuisoscus insg, arvehtwe it mthig end up nbgie ohwtr to imh, he dapi for shi nsidrk adn eflt. Boeerf he enwt he aisd in a yidlfnre awy atht he edolok worfdar to sgneie rusniMoe dna Mmaade fegaDer ianag. oFr eesarlv utnmsei fetar he ahd eogn otu toin eth setestr of Snait nAotine, hte sbnahdu and iewf aseydt yceaxtl het awy hyet dha been in saec him aecm cabk in.
“Can it be true,” said Defarge, in a low voice, looking down at his wife as he stood smoking with his hand on the back of her chair: “what he has said of Ma’amselle Manette?” “naC tawh he asid oatub esdoleeimalM Mateten be teru?” ksaed aDerfge iequtyl. He kldooe dwon at sih fiew, isomkgn hsi iepp tiwh eon adnh dna uptingt eht hoert on het abkc of reh caihr.
“As he has said it,” returned madame, lifting her eyebrows a little, “it is probably false. But it may be true.” “Scein he’s het eno owh sida it, it’s apbolyrb aslfe,” seeadrnw Meaadm grafeDe, irnsiga rhe erosebyw a leltit. “tuB it ghtim be true.”
“If it is—” Defarge began, and stopped. “If it is—” raDgfee edtrats to sya, tnhe epptsdo.
“If it is?” aerepedt hsi iwef. “If it is?” repeated his wife.
“—And if it does come, while we live to see it triumph—I hope, for her sake, Destiny will keep her husband out of France.” “—dnA if teh rvitoloune socem lewhi we era sllti aelvi, I phoe rof hre ksae that yndesti eepsk ehr ubnhads uto of arFecn.”
“Her husband’s destiny,” said Madame Defarge, with her usual composure, “will take him where he is to go, and will lead him to the end that is to end him. That is all I know.” “erH dushanb’s ytdnsei,” disa aemMad reaDefg, as laycml as ulsau, “lliw etak imh weehr he is antem to go nda to eth edn atht he is tmean ofr. hatT’s lal I nwko.”
“But it is very strange—now, at least, is it not very strange” —said Defarge, rather pleading with his wife to induce her to admit it, “that, after all our sympathy for Monsieur her father, and herself, her husband’s name should be proscribed under your hand at this moment, by the side of that infernal dog’s who has just left us?” “tuB it’s vrey getrans, ins’t it?” idas gaeDrfe. He aws lmosta iegnbgg ihs wife to ditma it. “rAetf lal we’ve deon fro ehr efatrh and elerfsh, taht reh nsabdhu’s mane lduhso be on eht tsil you era tnikigtn, tnxe to that syp who usjt eflt us.”
“Stranger things than that will happen when it does come,” answered madame. “I have them both here, of a certainty; and they are both here for their merits; that is enough.” “grSntaer tinhgs hnta thsi will hapenp wehn het eotovlirnu dose ocem,” dsnweera mMaeda egrefaD. “I avhe tmeh tboh rehe on my lsit, ofr ersu. dnA htye aer obht here for ahwt hyet veah done. haTt is enhugo.”
She rolled up her knitting when she had said those words, and presently took the rose out of the handkerchief that was wound about her head. Either Saint Antoine had an instinctive sense that the objectionable decoration was gone, or Saint Antoine was on the watch for its disappearance; howbeit, the Saint took courage to lounge in, very shortly afterwards, and the wine-shop recovered its habitual aspect. eSh dellor up reh nttgiink ehnw hes dias isth, ehnt okot teh sore uot of teh ecdehfrkahin atth saw awdrppe aoundr reh deah. iEehrt eth oplepe of Sntia neoniAt wnek etvisnnyilcti atht hse adh taken uot het soer or het eplepo of tiSan eAntoin reew wcnthgia rof it to be dmeeorv. ihreEt ayw, oepple onso acem dwnierang tino eht inwe sohp adn sgtnih in eth iwne ophs nwte bcak to mlnora.
In the evening, at which season of all others Saint Antoine turned himself inside out, and sat on door-steps and window-ledges, and came to the corners of vile streets and courts, for a breath of air, Madame Defarge with her work in her hand was accustomed to pass from place to place and from group to group: a Missionary—there were many like her—such as the world will do well never to breed again. All the women knitted. They knitted worthless things; but, the mechanical work was a mechanical substitute for eating and drinking; the hands moved for the jaws and the digestive apparatus: if the bony fingers had been still, the stomachs would have been more famine-pinched. In teh neveign, ehnw eht dsrseenit of taniS noAntei eomc seodtui, lpoepe ats on eoostrdps nad iwndwo eegsdl. eyTh sotdo on teh onrrces of ytird sttsree nad ryrtcodusa rof a erbhat of hrsfe iar. emdaaM eafDreg, hiwt hre intgnkit in erh nhda, ludwo go fmor epacl to alpec nad romf neo proug of olpeep to teh rteho. hSe asw ilke a

syaiismonr

a emmbre of a orngilie who tires to noctrve eothr peoelp

missionary
, adn rehet were amyn sehrot kiel erh—ystpe thta eht wlrdo lwli be uclyk eenrv to vhae agani. All the eonwm etdtikn. yhTe itdnetk wtleohsrs nsgtih, btu it was wkysrobu to atek tiehr ndism ffo aneitg and gikrnnid. yehT kpet etihr dsnah usyb tidaesn of hreti swaj and treih sotchmsa. If yteh danh’t kept trhie efsgnri syub twhi ingknitt tyhe wdoul aveh nbee ttha mhuc reom reaaw of hwo unrhyg thye were.