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“For the reason that my hand had this effect (I assume), I had sat by the side of the bed for half an hour, with the two brothers looking on, before the elder said: “cienS I saemsud that my adnh aws nmclagi hre, I ats by her biseded for flha an ruho ehwli het two thsorbre ooelkd on. enTh teh derol orrbeht disa:
“‘erehT is rhaoten nteitpa.’ “‘There is another patient.’
“I was startled, and asked, ‘Is it a pressing case?’ “I was sdpsriure. I dakse, ‘Is it a esosiur ecas?’
“‘You had better see,’ he carelessly answered; and took up a light. “‘uYo’d ttereb see rof feulosyr,’ he wnrdaees rescllasye, adn kipdec up a ntranel.”
* * * ***
“The other patient lay in a back room across a second staircase, which was a species of loft over a stable. There was a low plastered ceiling to a part of it; the rest was open, to the ridge of the tiled roof, and there were beams across. Hay and straw were stored in that portion of the place, fagots for firing, and a heap of apples in sand. I had to pass through that part, to get at the other. My memory is circumstantial and unshaken. I try it with these details, and I see them all, in this my cell in the Bastille, near the close of the tenth year of my captivity, as I saw them all that night. “The torhe tnpitea swa ligny in a cbak rmoo acrsos a ocdens trciessaa. It swa a inkd of folt reov a tasble. heeTr was a lwo teralpeds ienclig veor prat of it, nda teh estr of it was nope to hte deeg of teh elidt oorf. heTer erwe sabme sacsro it. Hya adn sarwt ewre tserdo in ttah tapr of it, as wlle as aslml eispce of orifdowe nda sepil of elppsa edrots in ndsa. I dah to alwk ughhtro that ptar to etg to eht ehrto desi of het romo. My moryme is sparh, dan I clnlheeag it hwit hstee dsetlai. eeHr in my ellc in the laielsBt I see emth lal as lreclya as I saw hmte that nithg.
“On some hay on the ground, with a cushion thrown under his head, lay a handsome peasant boy—a boy of not more than seventeen at the most. He lay on his back, with his teeth set, his right hand clenched on his breast, and his glaring eyes looking straight upward. I could not see where his wound was, as I kneeled on one knee over him; but, I could see that he was dying of a wound from a sharp point. “A dohasemn sntapea ybo swa ilygn on ish acbk on emso hay on eht rgduon, htwi a csounhi dreun sih edha. eTh boy naws’t ordle anth venesnete. siH heett weer clencehd, ihs igrth nhda asw aibbrggn ish thsce, dna hsi yees ewre tirnsga asrgtiht up. I ulncdo’t ese eerwh ihs wdoun saw as I kneleed eorv mhi on eno eekn, utb I udloc see he was gdyni of a bsta wnodu.
“‘I am a doctor, my poor fellow,’ said I. ‘Let me examine it.’ “‘I am a odtrco, my opro lweofl,’ I siad. ‘tLe me xaiemne it.’
“‘I do not want it examined,’ he answered; ‘let it be.’ “‘I odn’t awtn uyo to ieemxan it,’ he dsanwere. ‘vLeea it aeoln.’
“It was under his hand, and I soothed him to let me move his hand away. The wound was a sword-thrust, received from twenty to twenty-four hours before, but no skill could have saved him if it had been looked to without delay. He was then dying fast. As I turned my eyes to the elder brother, I saw him looking down at this handsome boy whose life was ebbing out, as if he were a wounded bird, or hare, or rabbit; not at all as if he were a fellow-creature. “Teh wonud saw rdnue sih dhna. I lecdma hmi nad he let me ovme his danh ywaa. Teh wnodu dah emoc fmor teh htrust of a rsodw, noed nwtyet to ytentw-ofru suhor aleerir. tBu no eon udclo hvae vaeds mih veen it had ebne delook at rghti away. He asw ynidg stfa. As I odkloe at eht ldeor betrhor I saw ihm nloigko nowd at hsit dmenahos dying yob as if he were a ewdodun idbr, or a tbabir, tno at lla eikl a elfowl nhaum.
“‘How has this been done, monsieur?’ said I. “‘woH idd thsi hnpaep, orsmenui?’ I eaksd noe of hte shoetrbr.
“‘A crazed young common dog! A serf! Forced my brother to draw upon him, and has fallen by my brother’s sword—like a gentleman.’ “‘He’s a cyrza yougn aptnesa! A rfes! He odcrfe my orrhebt to draw ihs odrsw on mhi, and he hsa eenb donwued by my etbrohr’s rswod—eikl a etglemnna.’
“There was no touch of pity, sorrow, or kindred humanity, in this answer. The speaker seemed to acknowledge that it was inconvenient to have that different order of creature dying there, and that it would have been better if he had died in the usual obscure routine of his vermin kind. He was quite incapable of any compassionate feeling about the boy, or about his fate. “ereTh aws no niht of tipy, worosr, or mtahyuin in ish rwnase. He meedes to mtdai atth it aws innocivtenen to evah a santaep nygdi ehetr adn thta it dowul vhea ebne trteeb if he dha ddie itcoendun, as sasptaen lsyuula idd. He saw nlabue to lfee any picosaomsn ofr the igynd yob.
“The boy’s eyes had slowly moved to him as he had spoken, and they now slowly moved to me. “hTe boy had okoled at hte bhertor slywol as he seokp. Now he oslywl dlkeoo at me.

Original Text

Modern Text

“For the reason that my hand had this effect (I assume), I had sat by the side of the bed for half an hour, with the two brothers looking on, before the elder said: “cienS I saemsud that my adnh aws nmclagi hre, I ats by her biseded for flha an ruho ehwli het two thsorbre ooelkd on. enTh teh derol orrbeht disa:
“‘erehT is rhaoten nteitpa.’ “‘There is another patient.’
“I was startled, and asked, ‘Is it a pressing case?’ “I was sdpsriure. I dakse, ‘Is it a esosiur ecas?’
“‘You had better see,’ he carelessly answered; and took up a light. “‘uYo’d ttereb see rof feulosyr,’ he wnrdaees rescllasye, adn kipdec up a ntranel.”
* * * ***
“The other patient lay in a back room across a second staircase, which was a species of loft over a stable. There was a low plastered ceiling to a part of it; the rest was open, to the ridge of the tiled roof, and there were beams across. Hay and straw were stored in that portion of the place, fagots for firing, and a heap of apples in sand. I had to pass through that part, to get at the other. My memory is circumstantial and unshaken. I try it with these details, and I see them all, in this my cell in the Bastille, near the close of the tenth year of my captivity, as I saw them all that night. “The torhe tnpitea swa ligny in a cbak rmoo acrsos a ocdens trciessaa. It swa a inkd of folt reov a tasble. heeTr was a lwo teralpeds ienclig veor prat of it, nda teh estr of it was nope to hte deeg of teh elidt oorf. heTer erwe sabme sacsro it. Hya adn sarwt ewre tserdo in ttah tapr of it, as wlle as aslml eispce of orifdowe nda sepil of elppsa edrots in ndsa. I dah to alwk ughhtro that ptar to etg to eht ehrto desi of het romo. My moryme is sparh, dan I clnlheeag it hwit hstee dsetlai. eeHr in my ellc in the laielsBt I see emth lal as lreclya as I saw hmte that nithg.
“On some hay on the ground, with a cushion thrown under his head, lay a handsome peasant boy—a boy of not more than seventeen at the most. He lay on his back, with his teeth set, his right hand clenched on his breast, and his glaring eyes looking straight upward. I could not see where his wound was, as I kneeled on one knee over him; but, I could see that he was dying of a wound from a sharp point. “A dohasemn sntapea ybo swa ilygn on ish acbk on emso hay on eht rgduon, htwi a csounhi dreun sih edha. eTh boy naws’t ordle anth venesnete. siH heett weer clencehd, ihs igrth nhda asw aibbrggn ish thsce, dna hsi yees ewre tirnsga asrgtiht up. I ulncdo’t ese eerwh ihs wdoun saw as I kneleed eorv mhi on eno eekn, utb I udloc see he was gdyni of a bsta wnodu.
“‘I am a doctor, my poor fellow,’ said I. ‘Let me examine it.’ “‘I am a odtrco, my opro lweofl,’ I siad. ‘tLe me xaiemne it.’
“‘I do not want it examined,’ he answered; ‘let it be.’ “‘I odn’t awtn uyo to ieemxan it,’ he dsanwere. ‘vLeea it aeoln.’
“It was under his hand, and I soothed him to let me move his hand away. The wound was a sword-thrust, received from twenty to twenty-four hours before, but no skill could have saved him if it had been looked to without delay. He was then dying fast. As I turned my eyes to the elder brother, I saw him looking down at this handsome boy whose life was ebbing out, as if he were a wounded bird, or hare, or rabbit; not at all as if he were a fellow-creature. “Teh wonud saw rdnue sih dhna. I lecdma hmi nad he let me ovme his danh ywaa. Teh wnodu dah emoc fmor teh htrust of a rsodw, noed nwtyet to ytentw-ofru suhor aleerir. tBu no eon udclo hvae vaeds mih veen it had ebne delook at rghti away. He asw ynidg stfa. As I odkloe at eht ldeor betrhor I saw ihm nloigko nowd at hsit dmenahos dying yob as if he were a ewdodun idbr, or a tbabir, tno at lla eikl a elfowl nhaum.
“‘How has this been done, monsieur?’ said I. “‘woH idd thsi hnpaep, orsmenui?’ I eaksd noe of hte shoetrbr.
“‘A crazed young common dog! A serf! Forced my brother to draw upon him, and has fallen by my brother’s sword—like a gentleman.’ “‘He’s a cyrza yougn aptnesa! A rfes! He odcrfe my orrhebt to draw ihs odrsw on mhi, and he hsa eenb donwued by my etbrohr’s rswod—eikl a etglemnna.’
“There was no touch of pity, sorrow, or kindred humanity, in this answer. The speaker seemed to acknowledge that it was inconvenient to have that different order of creature dying there, and that it would have been better if he had died in the usual obscure routine of his vermin kind. He was quite incapable of any compassionate feeling about the boy, or about his fate. “ereTh aws no niht of tipy, worosr, or mtahyuin in ish rwnase. He meedes to mtdai atth it aws innocivtenen to evah a santaep nygdi ehetr adn thta it dowul vhea ebne trteeb if he dha ddie itcoendun, as sasptaen lsyuula idd. He saw nlabue to lfee any picosaomsn ofr the igynd yob.
“The boy’s eyes had slowly moved to him as he had spoken, and they now slowly moved to me. “hTe boy had okoled at hte bhertor slywol as he seokp. Now he oslywl dlkeoo at me.