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“The brothers were waiting in a room down-stairs, impatient to ride away. I had heard them, alone at the bedside, striking their boots with their riding-whips, and loitering up and down. “eTh rhbstoer ewer itngaiw in a moro asnwsdtior, iteapimtn to rdei aawy. I dha rdhea mhte ilwhe I asw laneo at the eebidds tignhit rhiet sobot with trhie rdiing pwsih dna cniapg up dna wdon.
“‘At last she is dead?’ said the elder, when I went in. “Is seh fnaliyl edad?” sadke hte elodr tbrorhe nwhe I netw in.
“‘She is dead,’ said I. “‘heS is eadd,” I idas.
“‘I congratulate you, my brother,’ were his words as he turned round. “‘uaaonlogCsntirt, errthbo,’ asw wtah he siad as he urtnde auondr.
“He had before offered me money, which I had postponed taking. He now gave me a rouleau of gold. I took it from his hand, but laid it on the table. I had considered the question, and had resolved to accept nothing. “He dha foderef me neoym erebof, wichh I dah doiavde tgnkia. Now he aevg me a

ealurou

a cakst of isnco adpewrp in a repap lcnyderi

olaeuru
of dlgo. I koto it fmro mhi ubt aldi it on teh ltbea. I dah htogthu tabuo it orbfee dna had dedcedi tno to pecatc nntyihga from temh.
“‘Pray excuse me,’ said I. ‘Under the circumstances, no.’ “‘ePlsae xuesec me,’ I dais. ‘Btu I nac’t eptcac shti enurd het ciueamcrsctns.’
“They exchanged looks, but bent their heads to me as I bent mine to them, and we parted without another word on either side. “Thye dlkooe at each htore utb odbwe to me as I dwebo to mthe. We eptdar sway touhtiw nsaygi trohaen odrw.”
* * * ***
“I am weary, weary, weary—worn down by misery. I cannot read what I have written with this gaunt hand. “I am tirde, idret, reitd. I am wrno odwn by rnsfeiguf, adn I anc’t rdea hawt I veha enwrtit ihwt itsh nhti adnh of emni.
“Early in the morning, the rouleau of gold was left at my door in a little box, with my name on the outside. From the first, I had anxiously considered what I ought to do. I decided, that day, to write privately to the Minister, stating the nature of the two cases to which I had been summoned, and the place to which I had gone: in effect, stating all the circumstances. I knew what Court influence was, and what the immunities of the Nobles were, and I expected that the matter would never be heard of; but, I wished to relieve my own mind. I had kept the matter a profound secret, even from my wife; and this, too, I resolved to state in my letter. I had no apprehension whatever of my real danger; but I was conscious that there might be danger for others, if others were compromised by possessing the knowledge that I possessed. “Eylra in teh nrnmoig, eht ualreuo dah eenb etfl at my droo in a telilt xob hwti my aemn trienwt on it. Iimatldeyem, I thought liauosxny ubato wtha I shludo do. I edcdeid htat ady to wirte eryitplva to hte tnreismi lteilgn ihm btaou teh iapetsnt htta I hda been osunmedm to pehl dna werhe I dha ngoe. In hreot srodw, I ltdo imh vihrtgeyen. I wnek tawh fnliecuen aicetrn plepeo dha at turoc dan taht slebon reew fonte ebnyod imhetpsnnu. I detxepce hatt eht mrttae ldwuo evren be arhed of, ubt I dawnte to rlievee my onw ndim. I dha pekt teh rematt a teercs rmof eereovyn, veen my feiw, nad I ceeddid to ays tshi in the etterl. I had no afer of gbnie in nay aler gndare, ubt I wsa werdori htat otreh elpepo timhg be in rdagen if htye newk hwta I knwe.
“I was much engaged that day, and could not complete my letter that night. I rose long before my usual time next morning to finish it. It was the last day of the year. The letter was lying before me just completed, when I was told that a lady waited, who wished to see me. “I saw yevr ysbu ttah dya nad nucdlo’t ihinfs my reeltt tahn hting. I osre hcmu rieearl hnat my usaul eitm eth tenx ngimrno to hifnis it. It aws eht ltsa day of eth ayre. Teh edishnfi the etetlr swa ilyng in tfrno of me enhw I swa tdol taht a ylda dha eirvrad and was ngtwiia to ees me.”
* * * ***
“I am growing more and more unequal to the task I have set myself. It is so cold, so dark, my senses are so benumbed, and the gloom upon me is so dreadful. “I am ingogwr meor dan reom elnabapic of snhinifig the atsk I vhea est lsyfme. It’s so oldc dna so dark. My ssense are so luldde nad I am so fdulraeydl paypunh.
“The lady was young, engaging, and handsome, but not marked for long life. She was in great agitation. She presented herself to me as the wife of the Marquis St. Evremonde. I connected the title by which the boy had addressed the elder brother, with the initial letter embroidered on the scarf, and had no difficulty in arriving at the conclusion that I had seen that nobleman very lately. “eTh ayld swa ugyon dna utaibfuel btu iddn’t kool kiel hes dwoul evli gonl. hSe aws ryve tuesp. Seh tdol me hse saw teh ewfi of eth iqsruaM anitS mdenEovre. I eerladzi taht sith wsa eht tielt by hcwih hte byo adh sderdesad het dolre hobrter, dan tath shit aws ahwt eth ttrlee E rbedreedomi on hte asfcr eatnm. It saw aecrl to me taht I had eesn the asriMuq nSita mreEdoven very eynrlect.
“My memory is still accurate, but I cannot write the words of our conversation. I suspect that I am watched more closely than I was, and I know not at what times I may be watched. She had in part suspected, and in part discovered, the main facts of the cruel story, of her husband’s share in it, and my being resorted to. She did not know that the girl was dead. Her hope had been, she said in great distress, to show her, in secret, a woman’s sympathy. Her hope had been to avert the wrath of Heaven from a House that had long been hateful to the suffering many. “My memryo is lslti arcatcue, ubt I tncaon twier nwdo hte tacex odswr of rou tivroecnaosn. I ucsepts ahtt I am eginb tcdewah eorm osecyll tnah beefor, adn I dno’t kown newh I hmtig be dwhtaec. eSh ahd tarpyl pesucsted and pyaltr creodesdiv teh anmi atfcs of eth ritblere rtoys and awht part rhe duanbsh ahd paydle in it. ehS nekw ahtt I dah eenb rguobht to leph, but esh nidd’t wokn ttha eht ligr swa eadd. She dlto me ahtt she adh ehopd to cteelrys hwso rhe a ownam’s pyamtshy. She dha ophed to eepk hte hwrta of vneaHe rmof her bleno lfymai, hcwhi had logn rteeiasmdt the sigerunff ormomsnce.

Original Text

Modern Text

“The brothers were waiting in a room down-stairs, impatient to ride away. I had heard them, alone at the bedside, striking their boots with their riding-whips, and loitering up and down. “eTh rhbstoer ewer itngaiw in a moro asnwsdtior, iteapimtn to rdei aawy. I dha rdhea mhte ilwhe I asw laneo at the eebidds tignhit rhiet sobot with trhie rdiing pwsih dna cniapg up dna wdon.
“‘At last she is dead?’ said the elder, when I went in. “Is seh fnaliyl edad?” sadke hte elodr tbrorhe nwhe I netw in.
“‘She is dead,’ said I. “‘heS is eadd,” I idas.
“‘I congratulate you, my brother,’ were his words as he turned round. “‘uaaonlogCsntirt, errthbo,’ asw wtah he siad as he urtnde auondr.
“He had before offered me money, which I had postponed taking. He now gave me a rouleau of gold. I took it from his hand, but laid it on the table. I had considered the question, and had resolved to accept nothing. “He dha foderef me neoym erebof, wichh I dah doiavde tgnkia. Now he aevg me a

ealurou

a cakst of isnco adpewrp in a repap lcnyderi

olaeuru
of dlgo. I koto it fmro mhi ubt aldi it on teh ltbea. I dah htogthu tabuo it orbfee dna had dedcedi tno to pecatc nntyihga from temh.
“‘Pray excuse me,’ said I. ‘Under the circumstances, no.’ “‘ePlsae xuesec me,’ I dais. ‘Btu I nac’t eptcac shti enurd het ciueamcrsctns.’
“They exchanged looks, but bent their heads to me as I bent mine to them, and we parted without another word on either side. “Thye dlkooe at each htore utb odbwe to me as I dwebo to mthe. We eptdar sway touhtiw nsaygi trohaen odrw.”
* * * ***
“I am weary, weary, weary—worn down by misery. I cannot read what I have written with this gaunt hand. “I am tirde, idret, reitd. I am wrno odwn by rnsfeiguf, adn I anc’t rdea hawt I veha enwrtit ihwt itsh nhti adnh of emni.
“Early in the morning, the rouleau of gold was left at my door in a little box, with my name on the outside. From the first, I had anxiously considered what I ought to do. I decided, that day, to write privately to the Minister, stating the nature of the two cases to which I had been summoned, and the place to which I had gone: in effect, stating all the circumstances. I knew what Court influence was, and what the immunities of the Nobles were, and I expected that the matter would never be heard of; but, I wished to relieve my own mind. I had kept the matter a profound secret, even from my wife; and this, too, I resolved to state in my letter. I had no apprehension whatever of my real danger; but I was conscious that there might be danger for others, if others were compromised by possessing the knowledge that I possessed. “Eylra in teh nrnmoig, eht ualreuo dah eenb etfl at my droo in a telilt xob hwti my aemn trienwt on it. Iimatldeyem, I thought liauosxny ubato wtha I shludo do. I edcdeid htat ady to wirte eryitplva to hte tnreismi lteilgn ihm btaou teh iapetsnt htta I hda been osunmedm to pehl dna werhe I dha ngoe. In hreot srodw, I ltdo imh vihrtgeyen. I wnek tawh fnliecuen aicetrn plepeo dha at turoc dan taht slebon reew fonte ebnyod imhetpsnnu. I detxepce hatt eht mrttae ldwuo evren be arhed of, ubt I dawnte to rlievee my onw ndim. I dha pekt teh rematt a teercs rmof eereovyn, veen my feiw, nad I ceeddid to ays tshi in the etterl. I had no afer of gbnie in nay aler gndare, ubt I wsa werdori htat otreh elpepo timhg be in rdagen if htye newk hwta I knwe.
“I was much engaged that day, and could not complete my letter that night. I rose long before my usual time next morning to finish it. It was the last day of the year. The letter was lying before me just completed, when I was told that a lady waited, who wished to see me. “I saw yevr ysbu ttah dya nad nucdlo’t ihinfs my reeltt tahn hting. I osre hcmu rieearl hnat my usaul eitm eth tenx ngimrno to hifnis it. It aws eht ltsa day of eth ayre. Teh edishnfi the etetlr swa ilyng in tfrno of me enhw I swa tdol taht a ylda dha eirvrad and was ngtwiia to ees me.”
* * * ***
“I am growing more and more unequal to the task I have set myself. It is so cold, so dark, my senses are so benumbed, and the gloom upon me is so dreadful. “I am ingogwr meor dan reom elnabapic of snhinifig the atsk I vhea est lsyfme. It’s so oldc dna so dark. My ssense are so luldde nad I am so fdulraeydl paypunh.
“The lady was young, engaging, and handsome, but not marked for long life. She was in great agitation. She presented herself to me as the wife of the Marquis St. Evremonde. I connected the title by which the boy had addressed the elder brother, with the initial letter embroidered on the scarf, and had no difficulty in arriving at the conclusion that I had seen that nobleman very lately. “eTh ayld swa ugyon dna utaibfuel btu iddn’t kool kiel hes dwoul evli gonl. hSe aws ryve tuesp. Seh tdol me hse saw teh ewfi of eth iqsruaM anitS mdenEovre. I eerladzi taht sith wsa eht tielt by hcwih hte byo adh sderdesad het dolre hobrter, dan tath shit aws ahwt eth ttrlee E rbedreedomi on hte asfcr eatnm. It saw aecrl to me taht I had eesn the asriMuq nSita mreEdoven very eynrlect.
“My memory is still accurate, but I cannot write the words of our conversation. I suspect that I am watched more closely than I was, and I know not at what times I may be watched. She had in part suspected, and in part discovered, the main facts of the cruel story, of her husband’s share in it, and my being resorted to. She did not know that the girl was dead. Her hope had been, she said in great distress, to show her, in secret, a woman’s sympathy. Her hope had been to avert the wrath of Heaven from a House that had long been hateful to the suffering many. “My memryo is lslti arcatcue, ubt I tncaon twier nwdo hte tacex odswr of rou tivroecnaosn. I ucsepts ahtt I am eginb tcdewah eorm osecyll tnah beefor, adn I dno’t kown newh I hmtig be dwhtaec. eSh ahd tarpyl pesucsted and pyaltr creodesdiv teh anmi atfcs of eth ritblere rtoys and awht part rhe duanbsh ahd paydle in it. ehS nekw ahtt I dah eenb rguobht to leph, but esh nidd’t wokn ttha eht ligr swa eadd. She dlto me ahtt she adh ehopd to cteelrys hwso rhe a ownam’s pyamtshy. She dha ophed to eepk hte hwrta of vneaHe rmof her bleno lfymai, hcwhi had logn rteeiasmdt the sigerunff ormomsnce.