Original Text

Modern Text

MORTIMER

Yea, but Mark how he bears his course, and runs me up
105With like advantage on the other side,
Gelding the opposèd continent as much
As on the other side it takes from you.

MORTIMER

Yes, but look how the Trent runs its course and winds a similar distance into my share. It cuts out the same amount of land from my side as it does from yours.

WORCESTER

Yea, but a little charge will trench him here
And on this north side win this cape of land,
110And then he runs straight and even.

WORCESTER

Yes, but a small sum of money will pay to dig a trench, which will reclaim this bit of land on the north side. Then it will run straight along.

HOTSPUR

I’ll have it so. A little charge will do it.

HOTSPUR

I’ll do that. It will only take a little money.

GLENDOWER

I’ll not have it altered.

GLENDOWER

I won’t have it changed.

HOTSPUR

   Will not you?

HOTSPUR

You won’t?

GLENDOWER

No, nor you shall not.

GLENDOWER

No, and neither will you.

HOTSPUR

   Who shall say me nay?

HOTSPUR

Who’s going to stop me?

GLENDOWER

Why, that will I.

GLENDOWER

Why, I will.

HOTSPUR

115Let me not understand you, then; speak it in Welsh.

HOTSPUR

Well, say it in Welsh then, so I can’t understand you.

GLENDOWER

I can speak English, lord, as well as you,
For I was trained up in the English court,
Where being but young I framèd to the harp
Many an English ditty lovely well
120And gave the tongue a helpful ornament—
A virtue that was never seen in you.

GLENDOWER

My lord, I can speak English just as well as you. I was brought up in the English court. There, in my youth, I composed many English songs for the harp, lending the language lovely ornaments of music. That is an accomplishment you have never achieved.

HOTSPUR

Marry,
And I am glad of it with all my heart:
I had rather be a kitten and cry “mew”
125Than one of these same meter balladmongers.

HOTSPUR

Indeed, and my whole heart is glad for that. I’d rather be a kitten and say “meow” than be a courtly balladeer.