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155As a tired horse, a railing wife,
Worse than a smoky house: I had rather live
With cheese and garlic in a windmill, far,
Than feed on cates and have him talk to me
In any summerhouse in Christendom.
I’d rather live in a windmill and eat nothing but cheese and garlic than in a luxurious home eating delicacies, if it meant I had to listen to him talk.

MORTIMER

160In faith, he is a worthy gentleman,
Exceedingly well read and profited
In strange concealments, valiant as a lion,
And as wondrous affable, and as bountiful
As mines of India. Shall I tell you, cousin?
165He holds your temper in a high respect
And curbs himself even of his natural scope
When you come cross his humor. Faith, he does.
I warrant you that man is not alive
Might so have tempted him as you have done
170Without the taste of danger and reproof.
But do not use it oft, let me entreat you.

MORTIMER

Truly, he’s a worthy man. He’s exceedingly well-read, and proficient in the occult; he’s as brave as a lion, incredibly charming, and as generous as the jewel mines of India. And do you know what, cousin? He holds you in great respect. He restrains his temper when you do something to put him in a bad mood. I promise you, there isn’t a man alive who could have challenged him as you have, and gotten away without being hurt or punished. But don’t try it too often, I beg you.

WORCESTER

(to HOTSPUR) In faith, my lord, you are too willful-blame,
And, since your coming hither, have done enough
To put him quite beside his patience.
175You must needs learn, lord, to amend this fault.
Though sometimes it show greatness, courage, blood—
And that’s the dearest grace it renders you—
Yet oftentimes it doth present harsh rage,
Defect of manners, want of government,
180Pride, haughtiness, opinion, and disdain,
The least of which, haunting a nobleman,
Loseth men’s hearts and leaves behind a stain
Upon the beauty of all parts besides,
Beguiling them of commendation.

WORCESTER

(to HOTSPUR) Truly, my lord, you are to blame in your stubbornness. Since you arrived, you have done enough to test his patience. You must learn, sir, to correct this fault. Sometimes it demonstrates greatness, courage, strength—and that honors you. But often it reveals fury, bad manners, lack of self-control, pride, arrogance, conceitedness, and contempt. In a gentlemen, the least of these qualities will make you lose people’s affections. It stains your beautiful qualities, making it impossible for them to be noticed.

HOTSPUR

185Well, I am schooled. Good manners be your speed!
Here come our wives, and let us take our leave.

HOTSPUR

Well, I have had my lesson. May good manners bring you success! Here come our wives; let’s say our goodbyes.