Original Text

Modern Text

Enter GLENDOWER with the LADIES PERCY AND MORTIMER
GLENDOWER enters with the LADIES PERCY AND MORTIMER

MORTIMER

This is the deadly spite that angers me:
My wife can speak no English, I no Welsh.

MORTIMER

This is the bad luck that angers me: my wife speaks no English, and I speak no Welsh.

GLENDOWER

My daughter weeps; she’ll not part with you.
190She’ll be a soldier too, she’ll to the wars.

GLENDOWER

My daughter is weeping: she doesn’t want to be parted from you. She wants to be a soldier and join you in the war.

MORTIMER

Good father, tell her that she and my aunt Percy
Shall follow in your conduct speedily.

MORTIMER

Father-in-law, tell her that she and Lady Percy will come with you after us.
GLENDOWER speaks to THE LADY in Welsh, and she answers him in the same
GLENDOWER and THE LADY speak in Welsh.

GLENDOWER

She is desperate here, a peevish self-willed harlotry,
One that no persuasion can do good upon.

GLENDOWER

She’s desperate now; a cranky, selfish hussy. Nobody can change her mind.
THE LADY speaks again in Welsh
THE LADY speaks more Welsh.

MORTIMER

195I understand thy looks. That pretty Welsh
Which thou pourest down from these swelling heavens
I am too perfect in, and but for shame
In such a parley should I answer thee.

MORTIMER

I understand you by the look on your face. Those pretty Welsh tears streaming from your heavenly eyes I understand perfectly; I’d answer in the same language, if it weren’t shameful for a man to cry.
THE LADY speaks again in Welsh
THE LADY speaks more Welsh.
I understand thy kisses and thou mine,
200And that’s a feeling disputation;
But I will never be a truant, love,
Till I have learned thy language; for thy tongue
Makes Welsh as sweet as ditties highly penned,
Sung by a fair queen in a summer’s bower,
205With ravishing division, to her lute.
I understand your kisses and you mine; that’s a conversation of emotion. I’ll study continuously, my love, until I learn your language. Your voice makes Welsh sound as sweet as the most eloquently written songs, sung by a fair queen in a garden of summer flowers, with a gorgeous accompaniment on her a lute.