Henry IV, Part 1

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 3

page Act 3 Scene 3 Page 6

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MISTRESS QUICKLY

115Thou art an unjust man in saying so. Thou or any man knows where to have me, thou knave, thou.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

You’re awful for saying so: you or any man would know where to put me, you brute, you!

PRINCE HENRY

Thou sayest true, hostess, and he slanders thee most grossly.

PRINCE HENRY

You’re right, hostess, and he has really insulted you.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

So he doth you, my lord, and said this other day you owed him a thousand pound.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

He insulted you, too, my lord. Just the other day, he said you owed him a thousand pounds.

PRINCE HENRY

120Sirrah, do I owe you a thousand pound?

PRINCE HENRY

Sirrah, do I owe you a thousand pounds?

FALSTAFF

A thousand pound, Hal? A million. Thy love is worth a million; thou owest me thy love.

FALSTAFF

A thousand pounds, Hal? A million. Your love is worth a million, and you owe me your love.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

Nay, my lord, he called you “jack,” and said he would cudgel you.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

No, sir. He called you a bastard and said he’d beat you.

FALSTAFF

125Did I, Bardolph?

FALSTAFF

Did I, Bardolph?

BARDOLPH

Indeed, Sir John, you said so.

BARDOLPH

Indeed, Sir John, you said so.

FALSTAFF

Yea, if he said my ring was copper.

FALSTAFF

That’s right, if he said my ring was junk and made of copper.

PRINCE HENRY

I say ’tis copper. Darest thou be as good as thy word now?

PRINCE HENRY

And I do say that it’s made of copper. So will you dare keep your word and beat me?

FALSTAFF

Why, Hal, thou knowest, as thou art but man, I dare, but as thou art Prince, I fear thee as I fear the roaring of a lion’s whelp.

FALSTAFF

Hal, know this: if you were only a man, I would dare. But since you’re also a Prince, I’m scared of you, as much as I’m scared by the roar of a lion’s cub.

PRINCE HENRY

And why not as the lion?

PRINCE HENRY

Why the cub and not the lion?

FALSTAFF

The King is to be feared as the lion. Dost thou think I’ll fear thee as I fear thy father? Nay, an I do, I pray God my girdle break.

FALSTAFF

Only the King is as frightening as the lion. You think I’m as scared of you as I am of your father? If I am, I pray to God for my

belt

The breaking of a belt was considered bad luck.

belt
to break.