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WORCESTER

Hear me, my liege:
For mine own part I could be well content
To entertain the lag end of my life
25With quiet hours. For I do protest
I have not sought the day of this dislike.

WORCESTER

Listen, my lord. For me, I would love nothing more than to spend my old age in peace and quiet. I protest: I did not seek out this day of aggression.

KING

You have not sought it. How comes it then?

KING

You did not seek it? Then how did it come here?

FALSTAFF

Rebellion lay in his way, and he found it.

FALSTAFF

Rebellion was standing in front of him, and he bumped into it.

PRINCE HENRY

Peace, chewet, peace.

PRINCE HENRY

Quiet, you chatterer, quiet!

WORCESTER

30 (to the KING) It pleased your Majesty to turn your looks
Of favour from myself and all our house;
And yet I must remember you, my lord,
We were the first and dearest of your friends.
For you my staff of office did I break
35In Richard’s time, and posted day and night
To meet you on the way, and kiss your hand
When yet you were in place and in account
Nothing so strong and fortunate as I.
It was myself, my brother, and his son
40That brought you home and boldly did outdare
The dangers of the time. You swore to us,
And you did swear that oath at Doncaster,
That you did nothing purpose 'gainst the state,
Nor claim no further than your new-fall'n right,
45The seat of Gaunt, dukedom of Lancaster.
To this we swore our aid. But in short space
It rained down fortune show'ring on your head,
And such a flood of greatness fell on you—
What with our help, what with the absent King,
50What with the injuries of a wanton time,
The seeming sufferances that you had borne,

WORCESTER

(to the KING) Your Highness chose to turn your back on me and my family. I must remind you, sir, that we were your first and dearest friends. For you, I quit my position under Richard, and ran day and night to meet you on the road and kiss your hand. At that time, you were far less powerful than I was. But my brother, his son, and I brought you home and ignored the danger. At Doncaster you swore an oath to us that you were not going to challenge the King; all you wanted was your late father’s estate, the dukedom of Lancaster, and in this we promised to help you.
But soon, good luck began to pour on you like rain, and a flood of greatness fell upon you. You had a swarm of advantages: you had our assistance; and the King had been away so long; and the country was suffering under violence; and you seemed to have been so grievously wronged; and difficult winds were keeping