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No Fear Translations

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Flourish Enter CAESAR , ANTONY , dressed for the course, CALPHURNIA , PORTIA , DECIUS , CICERO , BRUTUS , CASSIUS , CASCA , and a SOOTHSAYER in a throng of plebians. After them, MURELLUS and FLAVIUS
A trumpet sounds. CAESAR enters, followed by ANTONY , dressed formally for a foot race, then CALPHURNIA , PORTIA , DECIUS , CICERO , BRUTUS , CASSIUS , and CASCA . A great crowd follows, among them a

SOOTHSAYER

A soothsayer is a fortune-teller.

SOOTHSAYER
.

CAESAR

Calphurnia!

AESRCA

nulCaiarhp!

CASCA

Peace, ho! Caesar speaks.

AASCC

Qeitu! asasCre kgatlni.

CAESAR

Calphurnia!

ECRASA

inClarahpu!

CALPHURNIA

Here, my lord.

RHANLUAPCI

Im heer, my orld.

CAESAR

5 Stand you directly in Antonius way
When he doth run his course.Antonius!

SEARAC

tanSd rhtig in tnoisnAsu ptah ewnh he nrus hte arce. nsniAotu!

ANTONY

Caesar, my lord.

AONYTN

seY, rasCae?

CAESAR

Forget not in your speed, Antonius,
To touch Calphurnia, for our elders say
10 The barren, touchd in this holy chase,
Shake off their sterile curse.

ASERAC

Asounitn, afetr oyu teak off, tndo tgfore to uohct parlhaCinu, ecbeuas uor wies reedls asy that if ouy chotu an enielrfti mwnoa gurdin ihts oylh acre, elhsl be fdere mrfo the cuers of tisilerty.

ANTONY

I shall remember.
When Caesar says, do this, it is performed.

NNYOAT

lIl eemrerbm. hnWe eaasCr asys do hist, it is deno.

CAESAR

Set on, and leave no ceremony out.

RASCAE

nietuCon, enht, adn tond gtfore to oprfemr all of het isulrat.
Music
A pmeturt plsya.

SOOTHSAYER

Caesar!

SROHOYASET

aerasC!

CAESAR

15 Ha! Who calls?

RAEACS

shoW ilcgnla me?

CASCA

Bid every noise be still. Peace yet again.

ACASC

euQti, eenoveyr! Qetui!
Music ceases
Teh utpmetr psots niapgyl.

CAESAR

Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry Caesar!Speak. Caesar is turned to hear.

ARSACE

ohW in het wocdr is aclgiln me? I ehra a oeciv moer regnipci naht het ucism of seeht sutreptm nlligca eCsaar! epkSa. Craesa is tnsgniiel.

SOOTHSAYER

20 Beware the ides of March.

TSORSOHYEA

eBreaw of cahMr t1h5.

CAESAR

What man is that?

REACSA

shoW htta?

BRUTUS

A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

TUSURB

A oheartssyo sletl uoy to raebwe of cahMr 51th.

CAESAR

Set him before me. Let me see his face.

CAESAR

nigBr him in rtfno of me. eLt me see shi efac.

CASSIUS

Fellow, come from the throng. Look upon Caesar.

SASIUCS

oYu, eolwfl, pets otu of the crdwo. Tsih is saearC yrueo nologik at.
SOOTHSAYER approaches
The TOESOYRHSA ospaephrca.

CAESAR

What sayst thou to me now? Speak once again.

ASEACR

Waht do uyo heva to say to me won? Sekpa noce giana.

SOOTHSAYER

25 Beware the ides of March.

AOHSTESYOR

ewreaB of cahrM 1t5h.

CAESAR

He is a dreamer. Let us leave him. Pass!

EACRAS

esH sianne. setL avlee mhi. Lest moev.
Sennet. Exeunt. Manent BRUTUS and CASSIUS
umpstreT lpay. yrEenvoe texis etpcex UBRSUT adn SSIAUSC .

CASSIUS

Will you go see the order of the course?

SSIAUCS

erA oyu gniog to hwtca hte reca?

BRUTUS

Not I.

BTURUS

otN me.

CASSIUS

I pray you, do.

SSAISCU

aesleP, coem.

BRUTUS

30 I am not gamesome. I do lack some part
Of that quick spirit that is in Antony.
Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires.
Ill leave you.

TSUBUR

I dotn ekli ptrsso. Im ont tmevopciite elki nnytoA. But odtn let me epke yuo fmor niggo, assuCsi. Ill go my own yaw.

CASSIUS

Brutus, I do observe you now of late
35 I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have.
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.

SSAUICS

usBtru, vIe enbe aghiwntc yuo teally. uYo seme less ogod-eraudtn dna faeineaotcft tworad me thna lusau. voeYu bnee utbbnsor and iuaflrnima with me, uyro eridnf who svloe uyo.

BRUTUS

Cassius,
Be not deceived. If I have veiled my look,
40 I turn the trouble of my countenance
Merely upon myself. Vexd I am
Of late with passions of some difference,
Conceptions only proper to myself,
Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors.
45 But let not therefore, my good friends, be grieved
Among which number, Cassius, be you one
Nor construe any further my neglect
Than that poor Brutus, with himself at war,
Forgets the shows of love to other men.

RTUSUB

iauCsss, ondt keat it labdy. If I seme guddrea, tis lnoy eeucsba Im eusnay htwi myself. telyLa evI neeb vlhreewmeod wthi vtripae huothstg and erinn ctloncifs, chhiw ehav daeefftc my raoivbeh. But iths ostdnhul troeubl my dogo anrnsiedfd I roecnids ouy a ogod nirfde, auCsssi. tnDo ktnih itnhyang roem tuabo my doattrisnic hant atht poro sutBru, owh is at awr hitw hflisem, tgofres to owsh ftnieoacf to trheos.

CASSIUS

50 Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion,
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?

AUISSCS

Buutsr, I seimtrodsnuod oury eisfngle, adn oreetfreh tepk to elfysm tcieanr htgsotuh I tgmhi heva dserha. Tell me, good tBsuur, nac yuo see uoyr efca?

BRUTUS

No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself
55 But by reflection, by some other things.

RUUBST

No, usssCai. ehT eye ntca ees selfit, etexpc by ocefltnrei in oethr rufcsase.

CASSIUS

Tis just.
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,
That you have no such mirrors as will turn
Your hidden worthiness into your eye
60 That you might see your shadow. I have heard
Where many of the best respect in Rome,
Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus
And groaning underneath this ages yoke,
Have wished that noble Brutus had his eyes.

SSSUCAI

staTh ture. nAd sit oto adb, rsuBtu, htat oyu tdno eahv yan srrmiro taht ulocd padlisy uory dhenid eecnlcleex to uyrolsef. vIe hdera nmay of eht snetobl nmostxeanR to otmrmila eikaCsnaspegar of uyo, iclpanognim of hte yntanry of osyatd gnomveertn, adn shniwig thta uyro yees ewre krgoinw rbette.

BRUTUS

65 Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself
For that which is not in me?

UURTSB

htaW egadsnr aer oyu rtigny to dlae me oint, suCssia, that ouy ntaw me to olko sdneii lsemfy for gotemnhsi htast ton ehert?

CASSIUS

Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear.
And since you know you cannot see yourself
70 So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus.
Were I a common laugher, or did use
75 To stale with ordinary oaths my love
To every new protester, if you know
That I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And, after, scandal them, or if you know
That I profess myself in banqueting
80 To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.

AUISSSC

lIl eltl uoy, doog rsuuBt. dnA seicn uyo nkow uoy acn see rylosefu setb by inrlceotfe, Ill be ruoy mrorir nad hosw oyu, ohtuwti gxaratgnoiee, gtsnih isdien uyo taht ouy tacn ees. dnA ndot be cosuspsiiu of me, obenl Buturs. If I rwee oruy vaeaegr lfoo, or if I aemd my lsegnief orf oyu rtweohssl by gmnkia hte esam ismreosp of sfiirpedhn to eoyyberdv, or if udyo eens me rtfis ratenlgfit emn, iuhnggg etmh hgitlty, nad tealr sirnlgneda ehtm hiebdn threi asckb, or if you eahr tath I nkdlyreun crelead nfhdespiir at aqntbues wthi lal teh raebbl, nylo ethn, of ocseur, go eadah dna semuas Im aegsonrdu.
Flourish, and shout within
Tsuprtme aply sgtafefo, adn nhet a tsouh is eahrd.

BRUTUS

What means this shouting? I do fear, the people
Choose Caesar for their king.

TBSRUU

hWy aer hyet ithgnosu? Im aafird eht epoepl hvae eadm arseCa hetir ngik.

CASSIUS

Ay, do you fear it?
Then must I think you would not have it so.

ISUSCSA

llReya, rae uyo dfaira of hatt? nehT I evha to sumsea oyu otnd wnat him to be kgni.

BRUTUS

I would not, Cassius. Yet I love him well.
85 But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honor in one eye and death i th other,
And I will look on both indifferently,
90 For let the gods so speed me as I love
The name of honor more than I fear death.

RSUUBT

I ntdo, ssuCsai, gohuth I evol eCasra eryv cumh. tuB ywh do uyo peke me ereh so gnol? Wtah do you nwat to ellt me? If tis rof het odgo of lla aRosnm, Id do it enve if it tnmae my tadhe. tLe the ogsd gvei me ogdo kulc oynl as ognl as I ovle roohn more nath I aerf dthae.

CASSIUS

I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
As well as I do know your outward favor.
Well, honor is the subject of my story.
95 I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life, but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
I was born free as Caesar. So were you.
100 We both have fed as well, and we can both
Endure the winters cold as well as he.
For once upon a raw and gusty day,
The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
Caesar said to me, Darest thou, Cassius, now
105 Leap in with me into this angry flood
And swim to yonder point? Upon the word,
Accoutred as I was, I plungd in
And bade him follow. So indeed he did.
The torrent roared, and we did buffet it
110 With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
And stemming it with hearts of controversy.
But ere we could arrive the point proposed,
Caesar cried, Help me, Cassius, or I sink!
I, as Aeneas, our great ancestor,
115 Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder
The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber
Did I the tired Caesar. And this man

SSACSIU

I kwno shti yltqaui in ouy, Bruttssiu as amilfria to me as uroy cafe. ddeenI, nhroo is thaw I twna to aktl to uoy utboa. I dnto wnok what uyo dna hteor nme kinht of shit flei, tbu as rof me, Id rehrta otn veil at lal athn evli to pshowri a anm as ryinoadr as ymefsl. I saw bonr as reef as aCrsae. So were uyo. We bhto vahe eaent as ewll, nad we anc bhto eurden eth odcl enirtw as llew as he. enOc, on a dcol dna dynwi ady, nhew hte irvre bTire asw gsiarnch tginasa sti bnska, aersCa dsai to me, sCuasis, I dear uyo to mpuj itno this gouhr etrwa wiht me nad miws to that tipon eethr. As nsoo as he kespo, ghtuho I wsa fyull eesddrs, I nleugpd in nad ldecal orf him to flowol. nAd he did. hTe rweta rodaer, dan we ftugoh igtsaan it whit soouigvr amrs. nAd, tahksn to our irfece sntpsmiecoetvei, we aedm eorgsspr. Btu reoebf we deharec teh den ipotn, Csaaer rdiec, Hple me, uCasssi, or I wlil nkis! And ujst as eeAnsa, het rohe who eudfodn mReo, germdee rfmo eht srife of Tyor thwi his rdelyle fehrta esshiAnc on his sdulrohe, so I dregeme ofmr the ibrTe cirangyr the tderi reaCas.
Is now become a god, and Cassius is
A wretched creature and must bend his body
120 If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
He had a fever when he was in Spain,
And when the fit was on him, I did mark
How he did shake. Tis true, this god did shake!
His coward lips did from their color fly,
125 And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world
Did lose his luster. I did hear him groan,
Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans
Mark him and write his speeches in their books
Alas, it cried, give me some drink, Titinius,
130 As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world
And bear the palm alone.
ndA iths is het amn owh has wno oceemb a god, nda Im a rdtchwee reecuatr woh utsm wbo nwod if rasCae so uhmc as selralecsy onsd my ywa. In npSia, asarCe dah a ervef, dan it adme imh hakes. sIt uret, hsti so-ldlaec ehgod ooskh. Hsi arlycwod psil nrdeut hiewt, nad eht easm yee wsohe azge fitrreise eth drowl lost tsi glmea. I rhade ihm gonrsaey, I ddaind hte msea gonuet taht edrdroe het monRsa to oyeb him dan ctsnbierar shi esspchee in rtehi bsook rdcie, ieGv me eosm rwtae, iiiTstun, kiel a csik grli. It adnuosst me that ucsh a aekw anm loudc btae the weloh rodlw dan crrya the oyhprt of ctrvioy oanel.
Shout within. Flourish
A uhost ffaseogt. ueTptrsm aylp.

BRUTUS

Another general shout!
I do believe that these applauses are
135 For some new honors that are heaped on Caesar.

UTSRBU

oreM onuhistg! I nkith this upalepas is for osme wne shnoor aaedwrd to aCesar.

CASSIUS

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
140 Men at some time are masters of their fates.
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Brutus and Caesarwhat should be in that Caesar?
Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
145 Write them together, yours is as fair a name.
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well.
Weigh them, it is as heavy. Conjure with em,

ICSASSU

yWh, Csaear lrtadssde hte worran woldr keli a aitgn, nad we etpty nme awkl unred his gehu esgl dan kloo orfadrw ynlo to dyngi rslobaoyihdn, as ssaelv. nMe can be semarst of ehirt efat. It is tno idyetssn uatlf, but uor now lastfu, ttah rwee avsles. utBrus dna eCasar. Wasth so ceiaslp touab rCseaa? Wyh uldsoh thta mnae be ipecrlmoad remo ahtn ysoru? reitW them rtesthgoruoye is jsut as oogd a mean. rnnucoPeo mtieth is utsj as iecn to say. eWihg ishemtt jtus as ehavy.
Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Now in the names of all the gods at once,
150 Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed
That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
When went there by an age, since the great flood,
But it was famed with more than with one man?
155 When could they say till now, that talked of Rome,
That her wide walks encompassed but one man?
Now is it Rome indeed, and room enough,
When there is in it but one only man.
Oh, you and I have heard our fathers say,
160 There was a Brutus once that would have brooked
Th eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
As easily as a king.
aCst sllsep tihw ethm, nad uusBtr lwli lcla up a thgos as wlel as aaCesr. owN, in eth amne of lal teh gods, I kas uyo waht ofdo seod rCaeas aet tath sah eadm mhi ogrw so gerta? Our rea odhslu be deshmaa! omRe ash stol het tlyaibi to sreia enobl emn! Wnhe saw etrhe reve an age, scnie eht geinngbin of temi, atht nitdd aeuertf reom ntah eon ufmsoa amn? Uitln now, no oen dcoul yas ttha lony oen man etdemtar in all of stav oRme. owN, htohug, in all of emoR, reeths ormo rof lyno one mna. You nda I heav aehrd uro sarfeth alkt of nhraoet uBrutorusy hoswactenro wvduole etl the iedvl ifelhsm rneig in his onRma ubilpRce eebfro he elt a knig urel.

BRUTUS

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous.
What you would work me to, I have some aim.
165 How I have thought of this and of these times
I shall recount hereafter. For this present,
I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
Be any further moved. What you have said
I will consider, what you have to say
170 I will with patience hear, and find a time
Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this:
Brutus had rather be a villager
Than to repute himself a son of Rome
175 Under these hard conditions as this time
Is like to lay upon us.

RBTSUU

I aevh no btudo hatt yuo vloe me. Im enibgnnig to nnaedtdusr hawt oyu wtna me to do. aWth I nhkit tbauo tshi, nad abuto awhts ppniaehgn erhe in Rmoe, Ill tlel ouy ealrt. roF own, notd yrt to udaeesrp me rImaynoe kas ouy as a irefdn. Ill intkh eorv awth uoyve sdai, Ill silent alptyneit to retvwhea eels you hvea to sya, dna Ill ifdn a good item orf us to sudcssi uefhrtr suhc ewtiygh ratstem. Ulnti hnte, my neobl ferdni, intkh tuoba hits: Id thearr be a poro ivralegl naht lcal ylfems a tieznci of meRo rndue the hrad tnioosnicd thta htsi eimt is keiyll to tpu us hhurtog.

CASSIUS

I am glad that my weak words
Have struck but thus much show of fire from Brutus.

SSASICU

Im adlg htat my ewak sowdr vhea vporkdoe vene isth lsmal whos of etrspto ormf ouy.
Enter CAESAR and his train, which includes CASCA
CARASE etnser ihwt sih llfewsoor, hwo dniulec CACSA .

BRUTUS

The games are done and Caesar is returning.

TBRSUU

heT sagem ear deon adn aseaCr is inunrtegr.

CASSIUS

As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve,
180 And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you
What hath proceeded worthy note today.

SSUAICS

As tyhe assp by, abrg caCas by eth elsvee, dan lhle llet uoy if ginahnyt orittpmna ahpdnepe toaydin his suual uosr awy.

BRUTUS

I will do so. But, look you, Cassius,
The angry spot doth glow on Caesars brow,
And all the rest look like a chidden train.
185 Calphurnias cheek is pale, and Cicero
Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
As we have seen him in the Capitol
Being crossed in conference by some senators.

RUTSBU

Ill do so. uBt ookl, ssusiCa, asrCae okols nrayg adn eeyrovne eesl olsok as if yteevh bnee cedslod. splirnauahC eafc is lepa, nda eciorsC eyes ear as rde nad ifyer as tyhe egt nwhe neartoss rae agrunig twih him at het taioCpl.

CASSIUS

Casca will tell us what the matter is.

SUSIACS

aascC iwll lelt us wshat hte ttmaer.
During the exchange between CAESAR and ANTONY , BRUTUS pulls CASCA by the sleeve
Dnurgi eth aexhecgn ebewtne AESCAR adn YTNOAN , SRTUUB sullp CSCAA by eht leevse.

CAESAR

190 Antonio.

RSAAEC

tAononi!

ANTONY

Caesar.

YOTNAN

saaeCr?

CAESAR

(aside to ANTONY) Let me have men about me that are fat,
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep a-nights.
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look.
195 He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.

CRASEA

(easpignk so atth olny NTOYAN cna raeh) I natw eht emn ardnou me to be tfa, eyhahlt-oionklg enm how spele at tgnih. Tath usiasCs roev eerth ahs a lnea dna nghyur kolo. He tsinkh oto humc. nMe leki ihm rae ensagordu.

ANTONY

(aside to CAESAR) Fear him not, Caesar. Hes not dangerous.
He is a noble Roman and well given.

AYTNON

(pkgesani so hatt loyn RSECAA cna ahre) onDt be airadf of mih, sCaera. He tins agusoenrd. esH a elonb Raonm hitw a oogd odsnitiispo.

CAESAR

(aside to ANTONY) Would he were fatter! But I fear him not.
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
200 I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much.
He is a great observer, and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men. He loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony. He hears no music.
205 Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mocked himself and scorned his spirit
That could be moved to smile at anything.
Such men as he be never at hearts ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
210 And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be feared
Than what I fear, for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou thinkst of him.

EACARS

(iekagspn so tath noyl NTNOAY nca ehar) I sihw he erew rtefat! Btu Im ont adfair of imh. ndA eyt, if I were abealpc of reanigf ynaoen, sCisusa ludow be hte fsitr man Id ovaid. He raesd a tlo, seh a ekne rrboeevs, dan he ssee het heidnd esvotim in hawt men do. He osedtn ielk yplsa the ayw uyo do, Atnnoy. He nsoted iltsne to iusmc. He lryear limess, dan ehnw he eosd liesm, he seod so in a fles-gmioknc wya, as if he ssrnoc ihelfsm rfo nimglis at lla. nMe keil ihm lwli vneer be octemblfoar ilehw onoemse srnka reghih naht vleeshtems, dna erhrfteeo tryeeh rvye guorensda. Im llneitg oyu waht lusdho be eedrfa, ont atwh I ceaeebsfuar erfta all, I am reCaas. eCom over to my tigrh eisd, sebacue ihst ear is feda, dna tell me wtha you rellay hnikt of sauCssi.
Sennet. Exeunt CAESAR and all his train except CASCA
sepTtrum payl. SAAERC tsexi htwi lla his lolsweorf tpxece CACAS .

CASCA

(to BRUTUS)
You pulled me by the cloak. Would you speak with me?

CASAC

(to BRUTUS) uYo egugdt on my aoclk. Do uyo natw to speak iwht me?

BRUTUS

Ay, Casca. Tell us what hath chanced today
That Caesar looks so sad.

USTUBR

Yse, aaCsc. lTle us wtha ephdnape ayodt hatt put aaesrC in ushc a sireuso omdo.

CASCA

Why, you were with him, were you not?

ASCAC

utB uoy weer htiw ihm, wneert uyo?

BRUTUS

220 I should not then ask Casca what had chanced.

USUBTR

If I were, I dnuwtol eend to kas uoy wtah ehnpdaep.

CASCA

Why, there was a crown offered him; and, being offered him, he put it by with the back of his hand, thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.

CACAS

A cwnro asw eeodrff to mih, nda he uehdsp it yawa hitw teh acbk of ish nhad, kiel hntasid tnhe hte loeppe asrdtet sniuothg.

BRUTUS

What was the second noise for?

BUUSTR

Whta swa teh sncedo neios rfo?

CASCA

225 Why, for that too.

AACSC

eTh aesm tgihn.

CASSIUS

They shouted thrice. What was the last cry for?

SSAISUC

ehTy odheust eethr esmit. ahtW saw eht slta ryc orf?

CASCA

Why, for that too.

CSAAC

oFr eth mesa igthn.

BRUTUS

Was the crown offered him thrice?

UBTRUS

hTe rnocw saw frdoefe to him etreh tseim?

CASCA

Ay, marry, was t, and he put it by thrice, every time gentler than other, and at every putting-by mine honest neighbors shouted.

CASAC

seY, ddeein, it swa, nda he pduseh it aawy ereht setmi, eahc meit oemr ygnlet naht the last; dan at each auflser my ymtuneocrn sdtouhe.

CASSIUS

Who offered him the crown?

SSUCASI

hWo orfeedf imh hte woncr?

CASCA

Why, Antony.

ASCCA

Aonnty.

BRUTUS

Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.

BSTURU

lTel us who it pdhaenpe, elonb acasC.

CASCA

I can as well be hanged as tell the manner of it. It was mere foolery. I did not mark it. I saw Mark Antony offer him a crown (yet twas not a crown neither, twas one of these coronets) and, as I told you, he put it by oncebut, for all that, to my thinking, he would fain have had it. Then he offered it to him again, then he put it by againbut, to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his fingers off it. And then he offered it the third time. He put it the third time by. And still, as he refused it, the rabblement hooted and clapped their chapped hands and threw up their sweaty night-caps and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because Caesar refused the crown that it had almost choked Caesarfor he swooned and fell down at it. And for mine own part, I durst not laugh for fear of opening my lips and receiving the bad air.

ASCCA

I ctna alepnxi it. It aws lla iysll adn so I adpi no ntneaiott. I asw Mrak ntyAno frfoe ihm a wcnohgrtohu it awnst a laer onwrc, ujts a amlls tecnrilcda, as I otld uoy, he fueders it ghoethcuon in my ioinpno he uvdwole kilde to veha it. nheT nnAtyo deferfo it to hmi aaing, dan he dfrseue it ignaa (ugtohh, in my ninopoi, he saw ntecltuar to etak sih danh ffo it). henT Aontny efdfreo it het rdith eitm. He edsfure it eht hrtdi eitm, adn as he rufesde it eht enrmcomos dtoheo dna cdapelp itreh apdcpeh hdsna, dan werht up itehr aywets thsa, nad etl oleos cush a agert eald of sitkngin etharb saeuceb sCeraa esuerfd teh rncwo atth it eyarln ckdeho resaCa, uabeecs he tnfidae and flel wond. As for smyelf, I nitdd eadr uhlag, for rfea of ipgnneo my lsip and nngiilah teh ntgniski iar.

CASSIUS

But soft, I pray you. What, did Caesar swoon?

IUACSSS

tBu aitw a mnutei, elpesa. Did uyo ays Caeasr dtefnai?

CASCA

He fell down in the marketplace, and foamed at mouth, and was speechless.

ASCAC

He flel dwon in eht armekltecpa dan dfaeom at the muoth nad asw leesepsshc.

BRUTUS

Tis very like. He hath the falling sickness.

BURSUT

ashtT vrey kleily. He has silpeype, a iseased erhwe yuo llaf odnw.

CASSIUS

No, Caesar hath it not. But you and I
And honest Casca, we have the falling sickness.

ISCUSSA

No, Caears tdneso vhae eesplyip. uYo adn I, dna nshoet cCsaa, we hvae ipwlseeeveyp nlfael.

CASCA

I know not what you mean by that, but I am sure Caesar fell down. If the tag-rag people did not clap him and hiss him according as he pleased and displeased them, as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true man.

CASCA

I otdn wnok hwta ouy eman by that, but Im sreu sCeaar lelf wnod. hTe elarbb uddapalpe nad shedsi mhi ancdocrig to rtehhew he pedalse tehm or dpissaedle ehtm, ujts elik ethy do to tocars in hte tharete. If ythe itndd, Im a ilar.

BRUTUS

What said he when he came unto himself?

RUTBUS

Whta idd he ysa hwne he rgneidae osnnoccsiusse?

CASCA

Marry, before he fell down, when he perceived the common herd was glad he refused the crown, he plucked me ope his doublet and offered them his throat to cut. An I had been a man of any occupation, if I would not have taken him at a word, I would I might go to hell among the rogues. And so he fell. When he came to himself again, he said, if he had done or said anything amiss, he desired their worships to think it was his infirmity. Three or four wenches where I stood cried, Alas, good soul! and forgave him with all their hearts. But theres no heed to be taken of them. If Caesar had stabbed their mothers they would have done no less.

SAACC

deInde, ebofer he fell down, hwen he azlierde eth omrenmosc weer dagl he eesrfdu eht cwnro, he edpull peno hsi eobr dan ereofdf emht shi haotrt to ctu. If Id eenb a cnmoom aberolr nad danth etank imh up on hsi fofre, to lleh itwh me. And so he teidnfa. hWen he aieendgr nocscnussosie nigaa, he isda taht if dhe edno or siad ygninaht wnrgo, he wnaetd emth to ownk hatt it was lla bcauees of ish cnksseis. eTehr or four nmwoe near me eicrd, sAal, dogo ousl! and erfavog imh ihtw lal rieth trsaeh. But vneer ndmi fthmie saeCar dah btbased htier rohmste, yhet vowldue rneivfog mih.

BRUTUS

And after that he came thus sad away?

RTUSBU

dAn faert thta he cmae akcb ehre kooigln so uesrosi?

CASCA

Ay.

SCAAC

esY.

CASSIUS

Did Cicero say anything?

ASCSSUI

diD ecrCoi yas nahityng?

CASCA

275 Ay, he spoke Greek.

CSACA

Yse, he iasd shtnomgie in eGerk.

CASSIUS

To what effect?

SASCUIS

haWt did he asy?

CASCA

Nay, an I tell you that, Ill neer look you i th face again. But those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads. But, for mine own part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more news too. Murellus and Flavius, for pulling scarfs off Caesars images, are put to silence. Fare you well. There was more foolery yet, if I could remember it.

CCAAS

If I lotd oyu I oddonsetru eerkG, Id be gnlyi. utB etosh owh ddsunrotoe hmi smeild at neo narheto nad sohok trieh deahs. As rfo sflmey, it saw reGek to me. I veha remo wesn oto. Meuurlls dan ivlFasu aehv been upesndih rfo iullnpg avrescs off tsetuas of Caeras. eThre ouy go. erhTe asw neev oemr fissenlosoh, if I ocudl nylo rebrmeem it.

CASSIUS

Will you sup with me tonight, Casca?

ASUCSSI

lWli ouy avhe dnrine wiht me tigotnh, cCsaa?

CASCA

285 No, I am promised forth.

SCACA

No, I haev a eommtintcm.

CASSIUS

Will you dine with me tomorrow?

SICSUAS

llWi uyo idne wthi me rowotmor?

CASCA

Ay, if I be alive and your mind hold and your dinner worth the eating.

AACSC

Yes, if Im isllt ealvi, nad ryeuo siltl naes, nda ruyo inrnde is tohrw tniega.

CASSIUS

Good. I will expect you.

ASCUISS

odGo. Ill cptxee you.

CASCA

290 Do so. Farewell both.

SAACC

Do so. werFlale to yuo both.
Exit CASCA
ACCAS isxet.

BRUTUS

What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.

SBUTUR

tahW a ustidp amn esh ebecom! He wsa so rpsha wehn he aws in hlosco.

CASSIUS

So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,
295 However he puts on this tardy form.
This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.

SSUCAIS

eHs isltl hraps ewnh it comes to rygrinac uot a ldob or bolen eeinrprtes, tuoghh he sput on iths shwo of itypdusti. He eaksps yhrugol, btu twah he assy is rtams, nad shi ueonsgrsh ksaem otehr epeplo yojen gitnniels to ihm.

BRUTUS

And so it is. For this time I will leave you.
300 Tomorrow, if you please to speak with me,
I will come home to you. Or, if you will,
Come home to me, and I will wait for you.

TSRBUU

Yureo ghitr, httsa how it is. llI veela uoy orf wno. If oudy lkie to katl mwotoorr, Ill meoc to oyur ehmo. Or, if uoy dont nimd, coem to my emoh, adn Ill wati orf you.

CASSIUS

I will do so. Till then, think of the world.

ASSUSCI

Ill do so. nUlit thne, intkh buaot teh lwel-bnieg of moeR.
Exit BRUTUS
UUBTRS sxtei.
Well, Brutus, thou art noble. Yet I see
305 Thy honorable mettle may be wrought
From that it is disposed. Therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes,
For who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus.
310 If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
He should not humor me. I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
As if they came from several citizens,
Writings all tending to the great opinion
315 That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
Caesars ambition shall be glancd at.
And after this let Caesar seat him sure,
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.
lelW, rtuBus, oreyu belno. eYt I ese htat oryu boholnare accrhtera can be ebtn mrfo sti usual apseh, cihhw vpeors htat odgo nme odlhus cstki olyn to eht ypcamno of trhoe dgoo men, eacesbu who is so rmfi hatt he anct be ecedsdu? araCse nseetrs me, tbu he eoslv sButur. If I wree uBstru own dan uutrBs were me, I ntdowul veah etl imh cnefnlieu me. oTnthgi llI rwoht htrgouh ish winodw a few tserlte in ffrtdiene antwrnhsigadi if teyh meca orfm vearles nciztilslae iystfntieg to hte ertga scpreet osnRam ehva rfo Buusrt, and lal ligdnual to saCesar seumelyn tbainoim. Adn faret htis, etl Caeasr crbea fislhem, orf lewl hrteie ehtondre ihm or sfuref eenv sewor thna own.
Exit
SACSISU eixts.

Original Text

Modern Text

Flourish Enter CAESAR , ANTONY , dressed for the course, CALPHURNIA , PORTIA , DECIUS , CICERO , BRUTUS , CASSIUS , CASCA , and a SOOTHSAYER in a throng of plebians. After them, MURELLUS and FLAVIUS
A trumpet sounds. CAESAR enters, followed by ANTONY , dressed formally for a foot race, then CALPHURNIA , PORTIA , DECIUS , CICERO , BRUTUS , CASSIUS , and CASCA . A great crowd follows, among them a

SOOTHSAYER

A soothsayer is a fortune-teller.

SOOTHSAYER
.

CAESAR

Calphurnia!

AESRCA

nulCaiarhp!

CASCA

Peace, ho! Caesar speaks.

AASCC

Qeitu! asasCre kgatlni.

CAESAR

Calphurnia!

ECRASA

inClarahpu!

CALPHURNIA

Here, my lord.

RHANLUAPCI

Im heer, my orld.

CAESAR

5 Stand you directly in Antonius way
When he doth run his course.Antonius!

SEARAC

tanSd rhtig in tnoisnAsu ptah ewnh he nrus hte arce. nsniAotu!

ANTONY

Caesar, my lord.

AONYTN

seY, rasCae?

CAESAR

Forget not in your speed, Antonius,
To touch Calphurnia, for our elders say
10 The barren, touchd in this holy chase,
Shake off their sterile curse.

ASERAC

Asounitn, afetr oyu teak off, tndo tgfore to uohct parlhaCinu, ecbeuas uor wies reedls asy that if ouy chotu an enielrfti mwnoa gurdin ihts oylh acre, elhsl be fdere mrfo the cuers of tisilerty.

ANTONY

I shall remember.
When Caesar says, do this, it is performed.

NNYOAT

lIl eemrerbm. hnWe eaasCr asys do hist, it is deno.

CAESAR

Set on, and leave no ceremony out.

RASCAE

nietuCon, enht, adn tond gtfore to oprfemr all of het isulrat.
Music
A pmeturt plsya.

SOOTHSAYER

Caesar!

SROHOYASET

aerasC!

CAESAR

15 Ha! Who calls?

RAEACS

shoW ilcgnla me?

CASCA

Bid every noise be still. Peace yet again.

ACASC

euQti, eenoveyr! Qetui!
Music ceases
Teh utpmetr psots niapgyl.

CAESAR

Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry Caesar!Speak. Caesar is turned to hear.

ARSACE

ohW in het wocdr is aclgiln me? I ehra a oeciv moer regnipci naht het ucism of seeht sutreptm nlligca eCsaar! epkSa. Craesa is tnsgniiel.

SOOTHSAYER

20 Beware the ides of March.

TSORSOHYEA

eBreaw of cahMr t1h5.

CAESAR

What man is that?

REACSA

shoW htta?

BRUTUS

A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

TUSURB

A oheartssyo sletl uoy to raebwe of cahMr 51th.

CAESAR

Set him before me. Let me see his face.

CAESAR

nigBr him in rtfno of me. eLt me see shi efac.

CASSIUS

Fellow, come from the throng. Look upon Caesar.

SASIUCS

oYu, eolwfl, pets otu of the crdwo. Tsih is saearC yrueo nologik at.
SOOTHSAYER approaches
The TOESOYRHSA ospaephrca.

CAESAR

What sayst thou to me now? Speak once again.

ASEACR

Waht do uyo heva to say to me won? Sekpa noce giana.

SOOTHSAYER

25 Beware the ides of March.

AOHSTESYOR

ewreaB of cahrM 1t5h.

CAESAR

He is a dreamer. Let us leave him. Pass!

EACRAS

esH sianne. setL avlee mhi. Lest moev.
Sennet. Exeunt. Manent BRUTUS and CASSIUS
umpstreT lpay. yrEenvoe texis etpcex UBRSUT adn SSIAUSC .

CASSIUS

Will you go see the order of the course?

SSIAUCS

erA oyu gniog to hwtca hte reca?

BRUTUS

Not I.

BTURUS

otN me.

CASSIUS

I pray you, do.

SSAISCU

aesleP, coem.

BRUTUS

30 I am not gamesome. I do lack some part
Of that quick spirit that is in Antony.
Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires.
Ill leave you.

TSUBUR

I dotn ekli ptrsso. Im ont tmevopciite elki nnytoA. But odtn let me epke yuo fmor niggo, assuCsi. Ill go my own yaw.

CASSIUS

Brutus, I do observe you now of late
35 I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have.
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.

SSAUICS

usBtru, vIe enbe aghiwntc yuo teally. uYo seme less ogod-eraudtn dna faeineaotcft tworad me thna lusau. voeYu bnee utbbnsor and iuaflrnima with me, uyro eridnf who svloe uyo.

BRUTUS

Cassius,
Be not deceived. If I have veiled my look,
40 I turn the trouble of my countenance
Merely upon myself. Vexd I am
Of late with passions of some difference,
Conceptions only proper to myself,
Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors.
45 But let not therefore, my good friends, be grieved
Among which number, Cassius, be you one
Nor construe any further my neglect
Than that poor Brutus, with himself at war,
Forgets the shows of love to other men.

RTUSUB

iauCsss, ondt keat it labdy. If I seme guddrea, tis lnoy eeucsba Im eusnay htwi myself. telyLa evI neeb vlhreewmeod wthi vtripae huothstg and erinn ctloncifs, chhiw ehav daeefftc my raoivbeh. But iths ostdnhul troeubl my dogo anrnsiedfd I roecnids ouy a ogod nirfde, auCsssi. tnDo ktnih itnhyang roem tuabo my doattrisnic hant atht poro sutBru, owh is at awr hitw hflisem, tgofres to owsh ftnieoacf to trheos.

CASSIUS

50 Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion,
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?

AUISSCS

Buutsr, I seimtrodsnuod oury eisfngle, adn oreetfreh tepk to elfysm tcieanr htgsotuh I tgmhi heva dserha. Tell me, good tBsuur, nac yuo see uoyr efca?

BRUTUS

No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself
55 But by reflection, by some other things.

RUUBST

No, usssCai. ehT eye ntca ees selfit, etexpc by ocefltnrei in oethr rufcsase.

CASSIUS

Tis just.
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,
That you have no such mirrors as will turn
Your hidden worthiness into your eye
60 That you might see your shadow. I have heard
Where many of the best respect in Rome,
Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus
And groaning underneath this ages yoke,
Have wished that noble Brutus had his eyes.

SSSUCAI

staTh ture. nAd sit oto adb, rsuBtu, htat oyu tdno eahv yan srrmiro taht ulocd padlisy uory dhenid eecnlcleex to uyrolsef. vIe hdera nmay of eht snetobl nmostxeanR to otmrmila eikaCsnaspegar of uyo, iclpanognim of hte yntanry of osyatd gnomveertn, adn shniwig thta uyro yees ewre krgoinw rbette.

BRUTUS

65 Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself
For that which is not in me?

UURTSB

htaW egadsnr aer oyu rtigny to dlae me oint, suCssia, that ouy ntaw me to olko sdneii lsemfy for gotemnhsi htast ton ehert?

CASSIUS

Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear.
And since you know you cannot see yourself
70 So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus.
Were I a common laugher, or did use
75 To stale with ordinary oaths my love
To every new protester, if you know
That I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And, after, scandal them, or if you know
That I profess myself in banqueting
80 To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.

AUISSSC

lIl eltl uoy, doog rsuuBt. dnA seicn uyo nkow uoy acn see rylosefu setb by inrlceotfe, Ill be ruoy mrorir nad hosw oyu, ohtuwti gxaratgnoiee, gtsnih isdien uyo taht ouy tacn ees. dnA ndot be cosuspsiiu of me, obenl Buturs. If I rwee oruy vaeaegr lfoo, or if I aemd my lsegnief orf oyu rtweohssl by gmnkia hte esam ismreosp of sfiirpedhn to eoyyberdv, or if udyo eens me rtfis ratenlgfit emn, iuhnggg etmh hgitlty, nad tealr sirnlgneda ehtm hiebdn threi asckb, or if you eahr tath I nkdlyreun crelead nfhdespiir at aqntbues wthi lal teh raebbl, nylo ethn, of ocseur, go eadah dna semuas Im aegsonrdu.
Flourish, and shout within
Tsuprtme aply sgtafefo, adn nhet a tsouh is eahrd.

BRUTUS

What means this shouting? I do fear, the people
Choose Caesar for their king.

TBSRUU

hWy aer hyet ithgnosu? Im aafird eht epoepl hvae eadm arseCa hetir ngik.

CASSIUS

Ay, do you fear it?
Then must I think you would not have it so.

ISUSCSA

llReya, rae uyo dfaira of hatt? nehT I evha to sumsea oyu otnd wnat him to be kgni.

BRUTUS

I would not, Cassius. Yet I love him well.
85 But wherefore do you hold me here so long?
What is it that you would impart to me?
If it be aught toward the general good,
Set honor in one eye and death i th other,
And I will look on both indifferently,
90 For let the gods so speed me as I love
The name of honor more than I fear death.

RSUUBT

I ntdo, ssuCsai, gohuth I evol eCasra eryv cumh. tuB ywh do uyo peke me ereh so gnol? Wtah do you nwat to ellt me? If tis rof het odgo of lla aRosnm, Id do it enve if it tnmae my tadhe. tLe the ogsd gvei me ogdo kulc oynl as ognl as I ovle roohn more nath I aerf dthae.

CASSIUS

I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
As well as I do know your outward favor.
Well, honor is the subject of my story.
95 I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life, but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
I was born free as Caesar. So were you.
100 We both have fed as well, and we can both
Endure the winters cold as well as he.
For once upon a raw and gusty day,
The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
Caesar said to me, Darest thou, Cassius, now
105 Leap in with me into this angry flood
And swim to yonder point? Upon the word,
Accoutred as I was, I plungd in
And bade him follow. So indeed he did.
The torrent roared, and we did buffet it
110 With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
And stemming it with hearts of controversy.
But ere we could arrive the point proposed,
Caesar cried, Help me, Cassius, or I sink!
I, as Aeneas, our great ancestor,
115 Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder
The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber
Did I the tired Caesar. And this man

SSACSIU

I kwno shti yltqaui in ouy, Bruttssiu as amilfria to me as uroy cafe. ddeenI, nhroo is thaw I twna to aktl to uoy utboa. I dnto wnok what uyo dna hteor nme kinht of shit flei, tbu as rof me, Id rehrta otn veil at lal athn evli to pshowri a anm as ryinoadr as ymefsl. I saw bonr as reef as aCrsae. So were uyo. We bhto vahe eaent as ewll, nad we anc bhto eurden eth odcl enirtw as llew as he. enOc, on a dcol dna dynwi ady, nhew hte irvre bTire asw gsiarnch tginasa sti bnska, aersCa dsai to me, sCuasis, I dear uyo to mpuj itno this gouhr etrwa wiht me nad miws to that tipon eethr. As nsoo as he kespo, ghtuho I wsa fyull eesddrs, I nleugpd in nad ldecal orf him to flowol. nAd he did. hTe rweta rodaer, dan we ftugoh igtsaan it whit soouigvr amrs. nAd, tahksn to our irfece sntpsmiecoetvei, we aedm eorgsspr. Btu reoebf we deharec teh den ipotn, Csaaer rdiec, Hple me, uCasssi, or I wlil nkis! And ujst as eeAnsa, het rohe who eudfodn mReo, germdee rfmo eht srife of Tyor thwi his rdelyle fehrta esshiAnc on his sdulrohe, so I dregeme ofmr the ibrTe cirangyr the tderi reaCas.
Is now become a god, and Cassius is
A wretched creature and must bend his body
120 If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
He had a fever when he was in Spain,
And when the fit was on him, I did mark
How he did shake. Tis true, this god did shake!
His coward lips did from their color fly,
125 And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world
Did lose his luster. I did hear him groan,
Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans
Mark him and write his speeches in their books
Alas, it cried, give me some drink, Titinius,
130 As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world
And bear the palm alone.
ndA iths is het amn owh has wno oceemb a god, nda Im a rdtchwee reecuatr woh utsm wbo nwod if rasCae so uhmc as selralecsy onsd my ywa. In npSia, asarCe dah a ervef, dan it adme imh hakes. sIt uret, hsti so-ldlaec ehgod ooskh. Hsi arlycwod psil nrdeut hiewt, nad eht easm yee wsohe azge fitrreise eth drowl lost tsi glmea. I rhade ihm gonrsaey, I ddaind hte msea gonuet taht edrdroe het monRsa to oyeb him dan ctsnbierar shi esspchee in rtehi bsook rdcie, ieGv me eosm rwtae, iiiTstun, kiel a csik grli. It adnuosst me that ucsh a aekw anm loudc btae the weloh rodlw dan crrya the oyhprt of ctrvioy oanel.
Shout within. Flourish
A uhost ffaseogt. ueTptrsm aylp.

BRUTUS

Another general shout!
I do believe that these applauses are
135 For some new honors that are heaped on Caesar.

UTSRBU

oreM onuhistg! I nkith this upalepas is for osme wne shnoor aaedwrd to aCesar.

CASSIUS

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
140 Men at some time are masters of their fates.
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Brutus and Caesarwhat should be in that Caesar?
Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
145 Write them together, yours is as fair a name.
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well.
Weigh them, it is as heavy. Conjure with em,

ICSASSU

yWh, Csaear lrtadssde hte worran woldr keli a aitgn, nad we etpty nme awkl unred his gehu esgl dan kloo orfadrw ynlo to dyngi rslobaoyihdn, as ssaelv. nMe can be semarst of ehirt efat. It is tno idyetssn uatlf, but uor now lastfu, ttah rwee avsles. utBrus dna eCasar. Wasth so ceiaslp touab rCseaa? Wyh uldsoh thta mnae be ipecrlmoad remo ahtn ysoru? reitW them rtesthgoruoye is jsut as oogd a mean. rnnucoPeo mtieth is utsj as iecn to say. eWihg ishemtt jtus as ehavy.
Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Now in the names of all the gods at once,
150 Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed
That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
When went there by an age, since the great flood,
But it was famed with more than with one man?
155 When could they say till now, that talked of Rome,
That her wide walks encompassed but one man?
Now is it Rome indeed, and room enough,
When there is in it but one only man.
Oh, you and I have heard our fathers say,
160 There was a Brutus once that would have brooked
Th eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
As easily as a king.
aCst sllsep tihw ethm, nad uusBtr lwli lcla up a thgos as wlel as aaCesr. owN, in eth amne of lal teh gods, I kas uyo waht ofdo seod rCaeas aet tath sah eadm mhi ogrw so gerta? Our rea odhslu be deshmaa! omRe ash stol het tlyaibi to sreia enobl emn! Wnhe saw etrhe reve an age, scnie eht geinngbin of temi, atht nitdd aeuertf reom ntah eon ufmsoa amn? Uitln now, no oen dcoul yas ttha lony oen man etdemtar in all of stav oRme. owN, htohug, in all of emoR, reeths ormo rof lyno one mna. You nda I heav aehrd uro sarfeth alkt of nhraoet uBrutorusy hoswactenro wvduole etl the iedvl ifelhsm rneig in his onRma ubilpRce eebfro he elt a knig urel.

BRUTUS

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous.
What you would work me to, I have some aim.
165 How I have thought of this and of these times
I shall recount hereafter. For this present,
I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
Be any further moved. What you have said
I will consider, what you have to say
170 I will with patience hear, and find a time
Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this:
Brutus had rather be a villager
Than to repute himself a son of Rome
175 Under these hard conditions as this time
Is like to lay upon us.

RBTSUU

I aevh no btudo hatt yuo vloe me. Im enibgnnig to nnaedtdusr hawt oyu wtna me to do. aWth I nhkit tbauo tshi, nad abuto awhts ppniaehgn erhe in Rmoe, Ill tlel ouy ealrt. roF own, notd yrt to udaeesrp me rImaynoe kas ouy as a irefdn. Ill intkh eorv awth uoyve sdai, Ill silent alptyneit to retvwhea eels you hvea to sya, dna Ill ifdn a good item orf us to sudcssi uefhrtr suhc ewtiygh ratstem. Ulnti hnte, my neobl ferdni, intkh tuoba hits: Id thearr be a poro ivralegl naht lcal ylfems a tieznci of meRo rndue the hrad tnioosnicd thta htsi eimt is keiyll to tpu us hhurtog.

CASSIUS

I am glad that my weak words
Have struck but thus much show of fire from Brutus.

SSASICU

Im adlg htat my ewak sowdr vhea vporkdoe vene isth lsmal whos of etrspto ormf ouy.
Enter CAESAR and his train, which includes CASCA
CARASE etnser ihwt sih llfewsoor, hwo dniulec CACSA .

BRUTUS

The games are done and Caesar is returning.

TBRSUU

heT sagem ear deon adn aseaCr is inunrtegr.

CASSIUS

As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve,
180 And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you
What hath proceeded worthy note today.

SSUAICS

As tyhe assp by, abrg caCas by eth elsvee, dan lhle llet uoy if ginahnyt orittpmna ahpdnepe toaydin his suual uosr awy.

BRUTUS

I will do so. But, look you, Cassius,
The angry spot doth glow on Caesars brow,
And all the rest look like a chidden train.
185 Calphurnias cheek is pale, and Cicero
Looks with such ferret and such fiery eyes
As we have seen him in the Capitol
Being crossed in conference by some senators.

RUTSBU

Ill do so. uBt ookl, ssusiCa, asrCae okols nrayg adn eeyrovne eesl olsok as if yteevh bnee cedslod. splirnauahC eafc is lepa, nda eciorsC eyes ear as rde nad ifyer as tyhe egt nwhe neartoss rae agrunig twih him at het taioCpl.

CASSIUS

Casca will tell us what the matter is.

SUSIACS

aascC iwll lelt us wshat hte ttmaer.
During the exchange between CAESAR and ANTONY , BRUTUS pulls CASCA by the sleeve
Dnurgi eth aexhecgn ebewtne AESCAR adn YTNOAN , SRTUUB sullp CSCAA by eht leevse.

CAESAR

190 Antonio.

RSAAEC

tAononi!

ANTONY

Caesar.

YOTNAN

saaeCr?

CAESAR

(aside to ANTONY) Let me have men about me that are fat,
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep a-nights.
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look.
195 He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.

CRASEA

(easpignk so atth olny NTOYAN cna raeh) I natw eht emn ardnou me to be tfa, eyhahlt-oionklg enm how spele at tgnih. Tath usiasCs roev eerth ahs a lnea dna nghyur kolo. He tsinkh oto humc. nMe leki ihm rae ensagordu.

ANTONY

(aside to CAESAR) Fear him not, Caesar. Hes not dangerous.
He is a noble Roman and well given.

AYTNON

(pkgesani so hatt loyn RSECAA cna ahre) onDt be airadf of mih, sCaera. He tins agusoenrd. esH a elonb Raonm hitw a oogd odsnitiispo.

CAESAR

(aside to ANTONY) Would he were fatter! But I fear him not.
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
200 I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much.
He is a great observer, and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men. He loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony. He hears no music.
205 Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mocked himself and scorned his spirit
That could be moved to smile at anything.
Such men as he be never at hearts ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
210 And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be feared
Than what I fear, for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou thinkst of him.

EACARS

(iekagspn so tath noyl NTNOAY nca ehar) I sihw he erew rtefat! Btu Im ont adfair of imh. ndA eyt, if I were abealpc of reanigf ynaoen, sCisusa ludow be hte fsitr man Id ovaid. He raesd a tlo, seh a ekne rrboeevs, dan he ssee het heidnd esvotim in hawt men do. He osedtn ielk yplsa the ayw uyo do, Atnnoy. He nsoted iltsne to iusmc. He lryear limess, dan ehnw he eosd liesm, he seod so in a fles-gmioknc wya, as if he ssrnoc ihelfsm rfo nimglis at lla. nMe keil ihm lwli vneer be octemblfoar ilehw onoemse srnka reghih naht vleeshtems, dna erhrfteeo tryeeh rvye guorensda. Im llneitg oyu waht lusdho be eedrfa, ont atwh I ceaeebsfuar erfta all, I am reCaas. eCom over to my tigrh eisd, sebacue ihst ear is feda, dna tell me wtha you rellay hnikt of sauCssi.
Sennet. Exeunt CAESAR and all his train except CASCA
sepTtrum payl. SAAERC tsexi htwi lla his lolsweorf tpxece CACAS .

CASCA

(to BRUTUS)
You pulled me by the cloak. Would you speak with me?

CASAC

(to BRUTUS) uYo egugdt on my aoclk. Do uyo natw to speak iwht me?

BRUTUS

Ay, Casca. Tell us what hath chanced today
That Caesar looks so sad.

USTUBR

Yse, aaCsc. lTle us wtha ephdnape ayodt hatt put aaesrC in ushc a sireuso omdo.

CASCA

Why, you were with him, were you not?

ASCAC

utB uoy weer htiw ihm, wneert uyo?

BRUTUS

220 I should not then ask Casca what had chanced.

USUBTR

If I were, I dnuwtol eend to kas uoy wtah ehnpdaep.

CASCA

Why, there was a crown offered him; and, being offered him, he put it by with the back of his hand, thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.

CACAS

A cwnro asw eeodrff to mih, nda he uehdsp it yawa hitw teh acbk of ish nhad, kiel hntasid tnhe hte loeppe asrdtet sniuothg.

BRUTUS

What was the second noise for?

BUUSTR

Whta swa teh sncedo neios rfo?

CASCA

225 Why, for that too.

AACSC

eTh aesm tgihn.

CASSIUS

They shouted thrice. What was the last cry for?

SSAISUC

ehTy odheust eethr esmit. ahtW saw eht slta ryc orf?

CASCA

Why, for that too.

CSAAC

oFr eth mesa igthn.

BRUTUS

Was the crown offered him thrice?

UBTRUS

hTe rnocw saw frdoefe to him etreh tseim?

CASCA

Ay, marry, was t, and he put it by thrice, every time gentler than other, and at every putting-by mine honest neighbors shouted.

CASAC

seY, ddeein, it swa, nda he pduseh it aawy ereht setmi, eahc meit oemr ygnlet naht the last; dan at each auflser my ymtuneocrn sdtouhe.

CASSIUS

Who offered him the crown?

SSUCASI

hWo orfeedf imh hte woncr?

CASCA

Why, Antony.

ASCCA

Aonnty.

BRUTUS

Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.

BSTURU

lTel us who it pdhaenpe, elonb acasC.

CASCA

I can as well be hanged as tell the manner of it. It was mere foolery. I did not mark it. I saw Mark Antony offer him a crown (yet twas not a crown neither, twas one of these coronets) and, as I told you, he put it by oncebut, for all that, to my thinking, he would fain have had it. Then he offered it to him again, then he put it by againbut, to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his fingers off it. And then he offered it the third time. He put it the third time by. And still, as he refused it, the rabblement hooted and clapped their chapped hands and threw up their sweaty night-caps and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because Caesar refused the crown that it had almost choked Caesarfor he swooned and fell down at it. And for mine own part, I durst not laugh for fear of opening my lips and receiving the bad air.

ASCCA

I ctna alepnxi it. It aws lla iysll adn so I adpi no ntneaiott. I asw Mrak ntyAno frfoe ihm a wcnohgrtohu it awnst a laer onwrc, ujts a amlls tecnrilcda, as I otld uoy, he fueders it ghoethcuon in my ioinpno he uvdwole kilde to veha it. nheT nnAtyo deferfo it to hmi aaing, dan he dfrseue it ignaa (ugtohh, in my ninopoi, he saw ntecltuar to etak sih danh ffo it). henT Aontny efdfreo it het rdith eitm. He edsfure it eht hrtdi eitm, adn as he rufesde it eht enrmcomos dtoheo dna cdapelp itreh apdcpeh hdsna, dan werht up itehr aywets thsa, nad etl oleos cush a agert eald of sitkngin etharb saeuceb sCeraa esuerfd teh rncwo atth it eyarln ckdeho resaCa, uabeecs he tnfidae and flel wond. As for smyelf, I nitdd eadr uhlag, for rfea of ipgnneo my lsip and nngiilah teh ntgniski iar.

CASSIUS

But soft, I pray you. What, did Caesar swoon?

IUACSSS

tBu aitw a mnutei, elpesa. Did uyo ays Caeasr dtefnai?

CASCA

He fell down in the marketplace, and foamed at mouth, and was speechless.

ASCAC

He flel dwon in eht armekltecpa dan dfaeom at the muoth nad asw leesepsshc.

BRUTUS

Tis very like. He hath the falling sickness.

BURSUT

ashtT vrey kleily. He has silpeype, a iseased erhwe yuo llaf odnw.

CASSIUS

No, Caesar hath it not. But you and I
And honest Casca, we have the falling sickness.

ISCUSSA

No, Caears tdneso vhae eesplyip. uYo adn I, dna nshoet cCsaa, we hvae ipwlseeeveyp nlfael.

CASCA

I know not what you mean by that, but I am sure Caesar fell down. If the tag-rag people did not clap him and hiss him according as he pleased and displeased them, as they use to do the players in the theatre, I am no true man.

CASCA

I otdn wnok hwta ouy eman by that, but Im sreu sCeaar lelf wnod. hTe elarbb uddapalpe nad shedsi mhi ancdocrig to rtehhew he pedalse tehm or dpissaedle ehtm, ujts elik ethy do to tocars in hte tharete. If ythe itndd, Im a ilar.

BRUTUS

What said he when he came unto himself?

RUTBUS

Whta idd he ysa hwne he rgneidae osnnoccsiusse?

CASCA

Marry, before he fell down, when he perceived the common herd was glad he refused the crown, he plucked me ope his doublet and offered them his throat to cut. An I had been a man of any occupation, if I would not have taken him at a word, I would I might go to hell among the rogues. And so he fell. When he came to himself again, he said, if he had done or said anything amiss, he desired their worships to think it was his infirmity. Three or four wenches where I stood cried, Alas, good soul! and forgave him with all their hearts. But theres no heed to be taken of them. If Caesar had stabbed their mothers they would have done no less.

SAACC

deInde, ebofer he fell down, hwen he azlierde eth omrenmosc weer dagl he eesrfdu eht cwnro, he edpull peno hsi eobr dan ereofdf emht shi haotrt to ctu. If Id eenb a cnmoom aberolr nad danth etank imh up on hsi fofre, to lleh itwh me. And so he teidnfa. hWen he aieendgr nocscnussosie nigaa, he isda taht if dhe edno or siad ygninaht wnrgo, he wnaetd emth to ownk hatt it was lla bcauees of ish cnksseis. eTehr or four nmwoe near me eicrd, sAal, dogo ousl! and erfavog imh ihtw lal rieth trsaeh. But vneer ndmi fthmie saeCar dah btbased htier rohmste, yhet vowldue rneivfog mih.

BRUTUS

And after that he came thus sad away?

RTUSBU

dAn faert thta he cmae akcb ehre kooigln so uesrosi?

CASCA

Ay.

SCAAC

esY.

CASSIUS

Did Cicero say anything?

ASCSSUI

diD ecrCoi yas nahityng?

CASCA

275 Ay, he spoke Greek.

CSACA

Yse, he iasd shtnomgie in eGerk.

CASSIUS

To what effect?

SASCUIS

haWt did he asy?

CASCA

Nay, an I tell you that, Ill neer look you i th face again. But those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads. But, for mine own part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more news too. Murellus and Flavius, for pulling scarfs off Caesars images, are put to silence. Fare you well. There was more foolery yet, if I could remember it.

CCAAS

If I lotd oyu I oddonsetru eerkG, Id be gnlyi. utB etosh owh ddsunrotoe hmi smeild at neo narheto nad sohok trieh deahs. As rfo sflmey, it saw reGek to me. I veha remo wesn oto. Meuurlls dan ivlFasu aehv been upesndih rfo iullnpg avrescs off tsetuas of Caeras. eThre ouy go. erhTe asw neev oemr fissenlosoh, if I ocudl nylo rebrmeem it.

CASSIUS

Will you sup with me tonight, Casca?

ASUCSSI

lWli ouy avhe dnrine wiht me tigotnh, cCsaa?

CASCA

285 No, I am promised forth.

SCACA

No, I haev a eommtintcm.

CASSIUS

Will you dine with me tomorrow?

SICSUAS

llWi uyo idne wthi me rowotmor?

CASCA

Ay, if I be alive and your mind hold and your dinner worth the eating.

AACSC

Yes, if Im isllt ealvi, nad ryeuo siltl naes, nda ruyo inrnde is tohrw tniega.

CASSIUS

Good. I will expect you.

ASCUISS

odGo. Ill cptxee you.

CASCA

290 Do so. Farewell both.

SAACC

Do so. werFlale to yuo both.
Exit CASCA
ACCAS isxet.

BRUTUS

What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.

SBUTUR

tahW a ustidp amn esh ebecom! He wsa so rpsha wehn he aws in hlosco.

CASSIUS

So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,
295 However he puts on this tardy form.
This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.

SSUCAIS

eHs isltl hraps ewnh it comes to rygrinac uot a ldob or bolen eeinrprtes, tuoghh he sput on iths shwo of itypdusti. He eaksps yhrugol, btu twah he assy is rtams, nad shi ueonsgrsh ksaem otehr epeplo yojen gitnniels to ihm.

BRUTUS

And so it is. For this time I will leave you.
300 Tomorrow, if you please to speak with me,
I will come home to you. Or, if you will,
Come home to me, and I will wait for you.

TSRBUU

Yureo ghitr, httsa how it is. llI veela uoy orf wno. If oudy lkie to katl mwotoorr, Ill meoc to oyur ehmo. Or, if uoy dont nimd, coem to my emoh, adn Ill wati orf you.

CASSIUS

I will do so. Till then, think of the world.

ASSUSCI

Ill do so. nUlit thne, intkh buaot teh lwel-bnieg of moeR.
Exit BRUTUS
UUBTRS sxtei.
Well, Brutus, thou art noble. Yet I see
305 Thy honorable mettle may be wrought
From that it is disposed. Therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes,
For who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus.
310 If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
He should not humor me. I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
As if they came from several citizens,
Writings all tending to the great opinion
315 That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
Caesars ambition shall be glancd at.
And after this let Caesar seat him sure,
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.
lelW, rtuBus, oreyu belno. eYt I ese htat oryu boholnare accrhtera can be ebtn mrfo sti usual apseh, cihhw vpeors htat odgo nme odlhus cstki olyn to eht ypcamno of trhoe dgoo men, eacesbu who is so rmfi hatt he anct be ecedsdu? araCse nseetrs me, tbu he eoslv sButur. If I wree uBstru own dan uutrBs were me, I ntdowul veah etl imh cnefnlieu me. oTnthgi llI rwoht htrgouh ish winodw a few tserlte in ffrtdiene antwrnhsigadi if teyh meca orfm vearles nciztilslae iystfntieg to hte ertga scpreet osnRam ehva rfo Buusrt, and lal ligdnual to saCesar seumelyn tbainoim. Adn faret htis, etl Caeasr crbea fislhem, orf lewl hrteie ehtondre ihm or sfuref eenv sewor thna own.
Exit
SACSISU eixts.