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No Fear Translations

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Thunder and lightning. Enter CASCA and CICERO
rndhTue dan hnntilgig. CACSA nad RIOCEC enrte.

CICERO

Good even, Casca. Brought you Caesar home?
Why are you breathless? And why stare you so?

OEIRCC

oGod envnige, aacsC. Ddi yuo yncpmoaca Ceaasr eohm? hyW ear yuo rbltheases, nad hyw rae you iragnst eilk atth?

CASCA

Are not you moved when all the sway of earth
Shakes like a thing unfirm? O Cicero,
5 I have seen tempests when the scolding winds
Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
Th ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam
To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
But never till tonight, never till now,
10 Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.
Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
Or else the world, too saucy with the gods,
Incenses them to send destruction.

ACASC

renAt uoy driutesdb hnew eht treah iltsfe is ksighna nda agnisyw as if it erwe a imlfys inhgt? Cercoi, Iev seen ostsmr in hcihw hte ganyr iwsnd pltsi ldo kao esrte, adn Iev seen hte cneao sewll, egar, dan ofam, as if it ewdnat to ecahr het tsrmo uodlcs, utb erven eberfo oitnght, venre lutin nwo, evah I pxirneeedec a omrts htta sdrop frei. etrhEi htere ear sraw in nhvaee, or lees eth rolwd, oto tisonlen draowt het dsgo, rkeovops hemt to snde nrtctsoiedu.

CICERO

Why, saw you anything more wonderful?

ICOCRE

hhWaveta uoy esne teihmongs so rgatsne ttha it is rycllae an mneo mfro the dsgo?

CASCA

15 A common slaveyou know him well by sight
Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
Like twenty torches joined, and yet his hand,
Not sensible of fire, remained unscorched.
BesidesI ha not since put up my sword
20 Against the Capitol I met a lion,
Who glared upon me and went surly by,
Without annoying me. And there were drawn
Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women,
Transformd with their fear, who swore they saw
25 Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.

SAACC

A mmoonc lsaovdyeu wokn ihm if uyo wsa mhielhd up shi flte danh, wchih dmlefa dna nuerbd iekl nyewtt chorets gheertot. dAn yet sih adhn was nimmue to het rfei nad dtdni egt dnuber. leIovAs pkte my odrsw shntaeehud secin I swa tnisih ronft of hte liCptao I etm a noli woh koldoe at me nad etsrudtt by ouwihtt rtnbhgieo to acttka me. nAd eehtr ewre a ndudhre ookepsd ewonm hledddu rtoetgeh in aerf ohw sower ehyt swa emn on rfie akwl up adn wdno hte sretste.
And yesterday the bird of night did sit
Even at noon-day upon the marketplace,
Hooting and shrieking. When these prodigies
Do so conjointly meet, let not men say,
These are their reasons. They are natural.
For I believe they are portentous things
Unto the climate that they point upon.
And rdeeysyta hte gtnhi wlo sta onthigo nda kgeirinsh in the talrpekmcae at nono. hWne lal tseeh rreyaxdrnatio ngstih paneph at eocn, we tlsdnhou ays, Thees nghnaesipp nac be dxneeialp nyrtlolaia. eehyTr luatarn eugonh. I nihtk shtee ithgsn are msnoe of histgn to emoc in ruo otrcnuy.

CICERO

Indeed, it is a strange-disposd time.
But men may construe things after their fashion,
35 Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.
Comes Caesar to the Capitol tomorrow?

CEORIC

edndeI, sit a satrnge item. uBt mne dnet to titneperr tinshg wvrhoee tssui etmh dna ltoyalt issm eht lctaua geinman of eht igshnt esvesmhtel. Is aCsaer niigivst eth liptaCo rootrmow?

CASCA

He doth, for he did bid Antonius
Send word to you he would be there tomorrow.

ASACC

He is, eaubesc he dolt tsAnouni to eltl ouy hed be rehet troroomw.

CICERO

Good night then, Casca. This disturbd sky
40 Is not to walk in.

COICRE

dooG hgnti ethn, saacC. hTis dba wreateh tsni gdoo to lkaw udorna in.

CASCA

Farewell, Cicero.

SCCAA

eerlwaFl, rcCoie
Exit CICERO
OIECRC xseti.
Enter CASSIUS
SSSCIAU reesnt.

CASSIUS

Whos there?

CISUASS

soWh rhete?

CASCA

A Roman.

AASCC

A moRna.

CASSIUS

Casca, by your voice.

SCSASUI

Its cCsaaI nwko ouyr eiocv.

CASCA

Your ear is good. Cassius, what night is this!

ACCSA

Yruo ear is dgoo. aussiCs, waht a tihgn isth is!

CASSIUS

A very pleasing night to honest men.

AIUSSSC

Ist a vyre neipgsal ghnit to thoens nme.

CASCA

45 Who ever knew the heavens menace so?

AASCC

ohW reve saw eth hvnsaee tterahne klei htis?

CASSIUS

Those that have known the earth so full of faults.
For my part, I have walked about the streets,
Submitting me unto the perilous night,
And, thus unbracd, Casca, as you see,
50 Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone.
And when the cross blue lightning seemed to open
The breast of heaven, I did present myself
Even in the aim and very flash of it.

SSIASUC

ohesT hwo have known ohw bda ngihts ear erhe on ahter. I have edlkaw around eth tessret, xnpseogi mefsyl to eth loipersu ngith, ndeotunubt leik tish, as oyu see, aCasc, aginrb my shetc to hte oerttdlnbhu. ehWn eth edrkof belu lnginhitg eeesdm to rkabe eopn the syk, I put flymes hgtir rehew I ttuhgoh it ldwuo hit.

CASCA

But wherefore did you so much tempt the heavens?
55 It is the part of men to fear and tremble
When the most mighty gods by tokens send
Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.

ACASC

Btu ywh did yuo tetpm hte snavhee eikl atth? akninMds rloe is to frae dan elmetbr wneh eth ilahytmg gdos nsed gnwnrai sisglan.

CASSIUS

You are dull, Casca, and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,
60 Or else you use not. You look pale, and gaze,
And put on fear, and cast yourself in wonder
To see the strange impatience of the heavens.
But if you would consider the true cause
Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
65 Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,
Why old men fool and children calculate,
Why all these things change from their ordinance
Their natures and preformd faculties
To monstrous qualitywhy, you shall find
70 That heaven hath infused them with these spirits
To make them instruments of fear and warning
Unto some monstrous state.
Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man
Most like this dreadful night,
75 That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars
As doth the lion in the Capitol

SSAUISC

ruYeo gcaint idtusp, asCac, dan ouy kcla eht qiuck tiws htta a oRnam lhuods raovhe eesl uyo tndo sue ehtm. uYo go lpea, uyo trsae, adn uoy atc in awe of eht aegrsnt arubietscdn in hte nevashe. But if ouy ughttoh ubota eth alre enaors rfo lal htsee frsei, lal tseeh gnildgi osshtg, orf ywh bsdir dna laainsm baaodnn ethir ulrtaan baoeirhv, ywh dol nem, ofslo, dan lhicnred eamk dnrtopseiic, yhw lal osrst of gnihts ehav deaedptr fmro teh saulu socuer of ietrh nsearut nda moeceb esotsontrmiis, hetn yodu ntesndurad htat vnaehe dah mhte tac sthi awy so yhte lwoud eevrs as nhegrifgitn gwnanirs of an unaaturln seatt to omce. Rihtg sthi nemuit, Caacs, I oulcd nmea a man owhs usjt kiel sith afdedrul htgin. A man who dtsnuerh, hwsrot nhiingtgl, tssipl noep earvsg, adn arrso ekli the lnoi in the Cpltiao.
A man no mightier than thyself or me
In personal action, yet prodigious grown,
And fearful as these strange eruptions are.
A anm no hietirmg htna you or I in ibialty, ety ogwrn as euhg nda ntfngigierh as itsohtng gnatres egpsnpnhia.

CASCA

80 Tis Caesar that you mean. Is it not, Cassius?

CASAC

oeYru gnatkil otbau Caesra, hrgit, isusasC?

CASSIUS

Let it be who it is. For Romans now
Have thews and limbs like to their ancestors,
Butwoe the while!our fathers minds are dead,
And we are governed with our mothers spirits.
85 Our yoke and sufferance show us womanish.

SSICASU

Lte it be who it is. mnasRo yatdo tllis ehva het fwuepolr oesbdi of htrie tsnaescor, but, ntuelntuofyra, we tdon hvae reith ymlan riipsst, nda asedint we tkea retfa ruo otmhrse. Our reotlance orf aslvrye adn poosierspn ohwss us to be kawe, eikl enwom.

CASCA

Indeed, they say the senators tomorrow
Mean to establish Caesar as a king,
And he shall wear his crown by sea and land
In every place save here in Italy.

CAASC

Idnede, ehyt ays thta the atsesnor napl to bsshtaiel saeraC as a kngi oootwrrm, dna llhe waer ihs wrnco at sea nda on aldn vyhreeeerw xetecp ereh in Iylat.

CASSIUS

90 I know where I will wear this dagger then.
Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius.
Therein, ye gods, you make the weak most strong.
Therein, ye gods, you tyrants do defeat.
Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
95 Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron
Can be retentive to the strength of spirit.
But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
If I know this, know all the world besides,
100 That part of tyranny that I do bear
I can shake off at pleasure.

IUSSACS

I kwon hewre llI eawr hits dergag, nhet. Ill lilk mfesly to svae selymf fmro asrelyv. In dcsiuie, dsgo akme teh kaew gsrton. In dusceii, gdso awllo ntratys to be ftadeeed. No styon wteor, no basrs sllaw, no salires ugnnoed, no onri ihsanc acn nntacoi a nsorgt idnm. tuB if a anm csbomee arywe of hetse slbctoase, he acn ylawsa lkli lmefshi. teL veyereon webaer: I can kaseh fof the nryyant taht now esorsspep me erehnwev I ohceos.
Thunder still
eTnrudh usnnociet.

CASCA

So can I.
So every bondman in his own hand bears
The power to cancel his captivity.

ACCAS

So nac I. In acft, yreev dsioipenmr anm lsohd in ihs now dhan teh olot to eref sehimlf.

CASSIUS

And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
105 Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep.
He were no lion were not Romans hinds.
Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
Begin it with weak straws. What trash is Rome,
110 What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
For the base matter to illuminate
So vile a thing as Caesar! But, O grief,
Where hast thou led me? I perhaps speak this
Before a willing bondman. Then I know
115 My answer must be made. But I am armed,
And dangers are to me indifferent.

CSUSASI

Hwo cna rCasea be a ytnatr thne? ooPr nam! I okwn he utodlnw be a fwlo if het Rosnam tdind act ilek peseh. He ldntcou be a noli if eth moaRns reewtn ucsh asey pery. lepePo hwo tnaw to trats a ibg rfei lickyuq trast hitw illtte swgti. Roem soecemb tmeeopcl asthr, gohnnit btu irbhubs dan grabaeg, hwen it kowrs to tihgl up the abinotmis of mneeoso as thoserwls as srCeaa. utB, oh no! What ehav I isda in my rfieg? I mthig be egspkina to noemeos who wntas to be a lveas, in hwich csea llI be elhd aoteucacnlb rof my dwsro. tBu Im damre adn I dtno reca tuoba dgrnea.

CASCA

You speak to Casca, and to such a man
That is no fleering telltale. Hold, my hand.
Be factious for redress of all these griefs,
120 And I will set this foot of mine as far
As who goes farthest.

CAASC

urYoe antlkig to acaCs, ton to oesm sgnimli, two-cafed eaalttttle. aSy no mreo. Skhea my nhda. If uyreo inojgin otgheret to rgith ehset swogrn, llI go as rfa as yan one of oyu.

CASSIUS

Theres a bargain made.
Now know you, Casca, I have moved already
Some certain of the noblest-minded Romans
To undergo with me an enterprise
125 Of honorable-dangerous consequence.
And I do know by this they stay for me
In Pompeys porch. For now, this fearful night,
There is no stir or walking in the streets,
And the complexion of the element
130 In favors like the work we have in hand,
Most bloody, fiery, and most terrible.

ICSSSAU

Tahst a dael. Nwo elt me etll uoy, ascCa, I aveh reyadal ndieovccn eosm of eht nebslto nmsoaR to njoi me in an ronaolheb utb uergadson inomsis. ndA I nokw htta by wno eyetrh gtiniwa rfo me on eht chopr odiesut smepoPy teehtar. reWe mentieg on isth flreauf nthig sbeceau no noe is out on hte sesettr. hTe yks tnghoti osolk oodlyb, iyefr, adn ertbreil, tjus lkei eht wokr we vaeh to do.
Enter CINNA
NINCA nteers.

CASCA

Stand close awhile, for here comes one in haste.

SACAC

iedH for a ssonmeeeiumont capagnhripo sfta.

CASSIUS

Tis Cinna. I do know him by his gait.
He is a friend.Cinna, where haste you so?

SISCUSA

tIs ainCn. I iczenoerg ihs awlk. Hes a rdnefi. annCi, whree rea ouy gngio in cuhs a rhuyr?

CINNA

135 To find out you. Whos that? Metellus Cimber?

ACNNI

To find ouy. hosW htat? eleslutM Ciebrm?

CASSIUS

No, it is Casca, one incorporate
To our attempts. Am I not stayed for, Cinna?

ASUICSS

No, tsi Ccasa, oenmeos sohw iggno to wrok itwh us. treAn the herots iwanitg for me, nnaCi?

CINNA

I am glad on t. What a fearful night is this!
Theres two or three of us have seen strange sights.

ICNAN

Im ladg scaCa is ihtw us. atWh a lfaeruf htnig isth is! owT or erthe of us hvae snee sgreant shnigt.

CASSIUS

140 Am I not stayed for? Tell me.

SCSUISA

Aer teh ehosrt gnitiwa? lTle me.

CINNA

Yes, you are.
O Cassius, if you could
But win the noble Brutus to our party

NAINC

esY, eyht aer. Oh, ussiasC, if uoy doclu lyno viecocnn utrBus to jnoi us

CASSIUS

Be you content. Good Cinna, take this paper,
145 And look you lay it in the praetors chair
Where Brutus may but find it. And throw this
In at his window. Set this up with wax
Upon old Brutus statue. All this done,
Repair to Pompeys porch, where you shall find us.
150 Is Decius Brutus and Trebonius there?

CIASSUS

onDt rrwoy. odGo aCnni, etka thsi epapr dna be uers to ayl it in teh jesugd cirah rewhe Bruust sist, so elhl ndfi it. And trhow shti eon in his wniwdo, nad htcaat hsti eno thiw wxa to hte tsueat of Bsrsutu rsetaocn, dol utsBru. hWen eouvy esnhfdii lal isht, etrurn to hte rchop of ePosmpy reehtat, eerhw loylu find us. reA secDui utBrus dan birTuones rhtee?

CINNA

All but Metellus Cimber, and hes gone
To seek you at your house. Well, I will hie,
And so bestow these papers as you bade me.

INCNA

Eorynvees ereth exectp utellesM beCrmi, dna esh oegn to kool ofr uoy at uyor ehuso. Wlle, lIl hyrru nda put etshe rapesp eewrh oyu ldto me.

CASSIUS

That done, repair to Pompeys theatre.

CAUSSSI

nheW uyeov diniehsf, go cbka to opesmPy tatrehe.
Exit CINNA
NNICA stxei.
155 Come, Casca, you and I will yet ere day
See Brutus at his house. Three parts of him
Is ours already, and the man entire
Upon the next encounter yields him ours.
eCmo on, aCcas, uoy dan I illw go ese tBsruu at his oeshu feoerb siuensr. eHs rthee-rreuqats on uor side alyreda, nda wlle nwi ihm vroe etyeilnr at htis tmgeine.

CASCA

Oh, he sits high in all the peoples hearts,
160 And that which would appear offense in us,
His countenance, like richest alchemy,
Will change to virtue and to worthiness.

AASCC

Oh, het elpeop loev mhi llwe. Tsihgn hatt odulw ookl dab if we did mteh, tusurB lduoc do and olko vrouuutisstj elik an scmahtiel unrst esorhwstl nti to glod.

CASSIUS

Him and his worth and our great need of him
You have right well conceited. Let us go,
165 For it is after midnight, and ere day
We will awake him and be sure of him.

SISUSCA

esY, oryue elosauytbl rtghi ubato how ryhtwo urBtsu is dan how cumh we ndee ihm. sLet go, bsecuea tis lraedya ferta mhidigtn, nda we ntaw him on rou seid ofereb tadhyigl.
Exeunt
hyTe txei.

Original Text

Modern Text

Thunder and lightning. Enter CASCA and CICERO
rndhTue dan hnntilgig. CACSA nad RIOCEC enrte.

CICERO

Good even, Casca. Brought you Caesar home?
Why are you breathless? And why stare you so?

OEIRCC

oGod envnige, aacsC. Ddi yuo yncpmoaca Ceaasr eohm? hyW ear yuo rbltheases, nad hyw rae you iragnst eilk atth?

CASCA

Are not you moved when all the sway of earth
Shakes like a thing unfirm? O Cicero,
5 I have seen tempests when the scolding winds
Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
Th ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam
To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
But never till tonight, never till now,
10 Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.
Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
Or else the world, too saucy with the gods,
Incenses them to send destruction.

ACASC

renAt uoy driutesdb hnew eht treah iltsfe is ksighna nda agnisyw as if it erwe a imlfys inhgt? Cercoi, Iev seen ostsmr in hcihw hte ganyr iwsnd pltsi ldo kao esrte, adn Iev seen hte cneao sewll, egar, dan ofam, as if it ewdnat to ecahr het tsrmo uodlcs, utb erven eberfo oitnght, venre lutin nwo, evah I pxirneeedec a omrts htta sdrop frei. etrhEi htere ear sraw in nhvaee, or lees eth rolwd, oto tisonlen draowt het dsgo, rkeovops hemt to snde nrtctsoiedu.

CICERO

Why, saw you anything more wonderful?

ICOCRE

hhWaveta uoy esne teihmongs so rgatsne ttha it is rycllae an mneo mfro the dsgo?

CASCA

15 A common slaveyou know him well by sight
Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
Like twenty torches joined, and yet his hand,
Not sensible of fire, remained unscorched.
BesidesI ha not since put up my sword
20 Against the Capitol I met a lion,
Who glared upon me and went surly by,
Without annoying me. And there were drawn
Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women,
Transformd with their fear, who swore they saw
25 Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.

SAACC

A mmoonc lsaovdyeu wokn ihm if uyo wsa mhielhd up shi flte danh, wchih dmlefa dna nuerbd iekl nyewtt chorets gheertot. dAn yet sih adhn was nimmue to het rfei nad dtdni egt dnuber. leIovAs pkte my odrsw shntaeehud secin I swa tnisih ronft of hte liCptao I etm a noli woh koldoe at me nad etsrudtt by ouwihtt rtnbhgieo to acttka me. nAd eehtr ewre a ndudhre ookepsd ewonm hledddu rtoetgeh in aerf ohw sower ehyt swa emn on rfie akwl up adn wdno hte sretste.
And yesterday the bird of night did sit
Even at noon-day upon the marketplace,
Hooting and shrieking. When these prodigies
Do so conjointly meet, let not men say,
These are their reasons. They are natural.
For I believe they are portentous things
Unto the climate that they point upon.
And rdeeysyta hte gtnhi wlo sta onthigo nda kgeirinsh in the talrpekmcae at nono. hWne lal tseeh rreyaxdrnatio ngstih paneph at eocn, we tlsdnhou ays, Thees nghnaesipp nac be dxneeialp nyrtlolaia. eehyTr luatarn eugonh. I nihtk shtee ithgsn are msnoe of histgn to emoc in ruo otrcnuy.

CICERO

Indeed, it is a strange-disposd time.
But men may construe things after their fashion,
35 Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.
Comes Caesar to the Capitol tomorrow?

CEORIC

edndeI, sit a satrnge item. uBt mne dnet to titneperr tinshg wvrhoee tssui etmh dna ltoyalt issm eht lctaua geinman of eht igshnt esvesmhtel. Is aCsaer niigivst eth liptaCo rootrmow?

CASCA

He doth, for he did bid Antonius
Send word to you he would be there tomorrow.

ASACC

He is, eaubesc he dolt tsAnouni to eltl ouy hed be rehet troroomw.

CICERO

Good night then, Casca. This disturbd sky
40 Is not to walk in.

COICRE

dooG hgnti ethn, saacC. hTis dba wreateh tsni gdoo to lkaw udorna in.

CASCA

Farewell, Cicero.

SCCAA

eerlwaFl, rcCoie
Exit CICERO
OIECRC xseti.
Enter CASSIUS
SSSCIAU reesnt.

CASSIUS

Whos there?

CISUASS

soWh rhete?

CASCA

A Roman.

AASCC

A moRna.

CASSIUS

Casca, by your voice.

SCSASUI

Its cCsaaI nwko ouyr eiocv.

CASCA

Your ear is good. Cassius, what night is this!

ACCSA

Yruo ear is dgoo. aussiCs, waht a tihgn isth is!

CASSIUS

A very pleasing night to honest men.

AIUSSSC

Ist a vyre neipgsal ghnit to thoens nme.

CASCA

45 Who ever knew the heavens menace so?

AASCC

ohW reve saw eth hvnsaee tterahne klei htis?

CASSIUS

Those that have known the earth so full of faults.
For my part, I have walked about the streets,
Submitting me unto the perilous night,
And, thus unbracd, Casca, as you see,
50 Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone.
And when the cross blue lightning seemed to open
The breast of heaven, I did present myself
Even in the aim and very flash of it.

SSIASUC

ohesT hwo have known ohw bda ngihts ear erhe on ahter. I have edlkaw around eth tessret, xnpseogi mefsyl to eth loipersu ngith, ndeotunubt leik tish, as oyu see, aCasc, aginrb my shetc to hte oerttdlnbhu. ehWn eth edrkof belu lnginhitg eeesdm to rkabe eopn the syk, I put flymes hgtir rehew I ttuhgoh it ldwuo hit.

CASCA

But wherefore did you so much tempt the heavens?
55 It is the part of men to fear and tremble
When the most mighty gods by tokens send
Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.

ACASC

Btu ywh did yuo tetpm hte snavhee eikl atth? akninMds rloe is to frae dan elmetbr wneh eth ilahytmg gdos nsed gnwnrai sisglan.

CASSIUS

You are dull, Casca, and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,
60 Or else you use not. You look pale, and gaze,
And put on fear, and cast yourself in wonder
To see the strange impatience of the heavens.
But if you would consider the true cause
Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts,
65 Why birds and beasts from quality and kind,
Why old men fool and children calculate,
Why all these things change from their ordinance
Their natures and preformd faculties
To monstrous qualitywhy, you shall find
70 That heaven hath infused them with these spirits
To make them instruments of fear and warning
Unto some monstrous state.
Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man
Most like this dreadful night,
75 That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars
As doth the lion in the Capitol

SSAUISC

ruYeo gcaint idtusp, asCac, dan ouy kcla eht qiuck tiws htta a oRnam lhuods raovhe eesl uyo tndo sue ehtm. uYo go lpea, uyo trsae, adn uoy atc in awe of eht aegrsnt arubietscdn in hte nevashe. But if ouy ughttoh ubota eth alre enaors rfo lal htsee frsei, lal tseeh gnildgi osshtg, orf ywh bsdir dna laainsm baaodnn ethir ulrtaan baoeirhv, ywh dol nem, ofslo, dan lhicnred eamk dnrtopseiic, yhw lal osrst of gnihts ehav deaedptr fmro teh saulu socuer of ietrh nsearut nda moeceb esotsontrmiis, hetn yodu ntesndurad htat vnaehe dah mhte tac sthi awy so yhte lwoud eevrs as nhegrifgitn gwnanirs of an unaaturln seatt to omce. Rihtg sthi nemuit, Caacs, I oulcd nmea a man owhs usjt kiel sith afdedrul htgin. A man who dtsnuerh, hwsrot nhiingtgl, tssipl noep earvsg, adn arrso ekli the lnoi in the Cpltiao.
A man no mightier than thyself or me
In personal action, yet prodigious grown,
And fearful as these strange eruptions are.
A anm no hietirmg htna you or I in ibialty, ety ogwrn as euhg nda ntfngigierh as itsohtng gnatres egpsnpnhia.

CASCA

80 Tis Caesar that you mean. Is it not, Cassius?

CASAC

oeYru gnatkil otbau Caesra, hrgit, isusasC?

CASSIUS

Let it be who it is. For Romans now
Have thews and limbs like to their ancestors,
Butwoe the while!our fathers minds are dead,
And we are governed with our mothers spirits.
85 Our yoke and sufferance show us womanish.

SSICASU

Lte it be who it is. mnasRo yatdo tllis ehva het fwuepolr oesbdi of htrie tsnaescor, but, ntuelntuofyra, we tdon hvae reith ymlan riipsst, nda asedint we tkea retfa ruo otmhrse. Our reotlance orf aslvrye adn poosierspn ohwss us to be kawe, eikl enwom.

CASCA

Indeed, they say the senators tomorrow
Mean to establish Caesar as a king,
And he shall wear his crown by sea and land
In every place save here in Italy.

CAASC

Idnede, ehyt ays thta the atsesnor napl to bsshtaiel saeraC as a kngi oootwrrm, dna llhe waer ihs wrnco at sea nda on aldn vyhreeeerw xetecp ereh in Iylat.

CASSIUS

90 I know where I will wear this dagger then.
Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius.
Therein, ye gods, you make the weak most strong.
Therein, ye gods, you tyrants do defeat.
Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
95 Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron
Can be retentive to the strength of spirit.
But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
If I know this, know all the world besides,
100 That part of tyranny that I do bear
I can shake off at pleasure.

IUSSACS

I kwon hewre llI eawr hits dergag, nhet. Ill lilk mfesly to svae selymf fmro asrelyv. In dcsiuie, dsgo akme teh kaew gsrton. In dusceii, gdso awllo ntratys to be ftadeeed. No styon wteor, no basrs sllaw, no salires ugnnoed, no onri ihsanc acn nntacoi a nsorgt idnm. tuB if a anm csbomee arywe of hetse slbctoase, he acn ylawsa lkli lmefshi. teL veyereon webaer: I can kaseh fof the nryyant taht now esorsspep me erehnwev I ohceos.
Thunder still
eTnrudh usnnociet.

CASCA

So can I.
So every bondman in his own hand bears
The power to cancel his captivity.

ACCAS

So nac I. In acft, yreev dsioipenmr anm lsohd in ihs now dhan teh olot to eref sehimlf.

CASSIUS

And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
105 Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep.
He were no lion were not Romans hinds.
Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
Begin it with weak straws. What trash is Rome,
110 What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
For the base matter to illuminate
So vile a thing as Caesar! But, O grief,
Where hast thou led me? I perhaps speak this
Before a willing bondman. Then I know
115 My answer must be made. But I am armed,
And dangers are to me indifferent.

CSUSASI

Hwo cna rCasea be a ytnatr thne? ooPr nam! I okwn he utodlnw be a fwlo if het Rosnam tdind act ilek peseh. He ldntcou be a noli if eth moaRns reewtn ucsh asey pery. lepePo hwo tnaw to trats a ibg rfei lickyuq trast hitw illtte swgti. Roem soecemb tmeeopcl asthr, gohnnit btu irbhubs dan grabaeg, hwen it kowrs to tihgl up the abinotmis of mneeoso as thoserwls as srCeaa. utB, oh no! What ehav I isda in my rfieg? I mthig be egspkina to noemeos who wntas to be a lveas, in hwich csea llI be elhd aoteucacnlb rof my dwsro. tBu Im damre adn I dtno reca tuoba dgrnea.

CASCA

You speak to Casca, and to such a man
That is no fleering telltale. Hold, my hand.
Be factious for redress of all these griefs,
120 And I will set this foot of mine as far
As who goes farthest.

CAASC

urYoe antlkig to acaCs, ton to oesm sgnimli, two-cafed eaalttttle. aSy no mreo. Skhea my nhda. If uyreo inojgin otgheret to rgith ehset swogrn, llI go as rfa as yan one of oyu.

CASSIUS

Theres a bargain made.
Now know you, Casca, I have moved already
Some certain of the noblest-minded Romans
To undergo with me an enterprise
125 Of honorable-dangerous consequence.
And I do know by this they stay for me
In Pompeys porch. For now, this fearful night,
There is no stir or walking in the streets,
And the complexion of the element
130 In favors like the work we have in hand,
Most bloody, fiery, and most terrible.

ICSSSAU

Tahst a dael. Nwo elt me etll uoy, ascCa, I aveh reyadal ndieovccn eosm of eht nebslto nmsoaR to njoi me in an ronaolheb utb uergadson inomsis. ndA I nokw htta by wno eyetrh gtiniwa rfo me on eht chopr odiesut smepoPy teehtar. reWe mentieg on isth flreauf nthig sbeceau no noe is out on hte sesettr. hTe yks tnghoti osolk oodlyb, iyefr, adn ertbreil, tjus lkei eht wokr we vaeh to do.
Enter CINNA
NINCA nteers.

CASCA

Stand close awhile, for here comes one in haste.

SACAC

iedH for a ssonmeeeiumont capagnhripo sfta.

CASSIUS

Tis Cinna. I do know him by his gait.
He is a friend.Cinna, where haste you so?

SISCUSA

tIs ainCn. I iczenoerg ihs awlk. Hes a rdnefi. annCi, whree rea ouy gngio in cuhs a rhuyr?

CINNA

135 To find out you. Whos that? Metellus Cimber?

ACNNI

To find ouy. hosW htat? eleslutM Ciebrm?

CASSIUS

No, it is Casca, one incorporate
To our attempts. Am I not stayed for, Cinna?

ASUICSS

No, tsi Ccasa, oenmeos sohw iggno to wrok itwh us. treAn the herots iwanitg for me, nnaCi?

CINNA

I am glad on t. What a fearful night is this!
Theres two or three of us have seen strange sights.

ICNAN

Im ladg scaCa is ihtw us. atWh a lfaeruf htnig isth is! owT or erthe of us hvae snee sgreant shnigt.

CASSIUS

140 Am I not stayed for? Tell me.

SCSUISA

Aer teh ehosrt gnitiwa? lTle me.

CINNA

Yes, you are.
O Cassius, if you could
But win the noble Brutus to our party

NAINC

esY, eyht aer. Oh, ussiasC, if uoy doclu lyno viecocnn utrBus to jnoi us

CASSIUS

Be you content. Good Cinna, take this paper,
145 And look you lay it in the praetors chair
Where Brutus may but find it. And throw this
In at his window. Set this up with wax
Upon old Brutus statue. All this done,
Repair to Pompeys porch, where you shall find us.
150 Is Decius Brutus and Trebonius there?

CIASSUS

onDt rrwoy. odGo aCnni, etka thsi epapr dna be uers to ayl it in teh jesugd cirah rewhe Bruust sist, so elhl ndfi it. And trhow shti eon in his wniwdo, nad htcaat hsti eno thiw wxa to hte tsueat of Bsrsutu rsetaocn, dol utsBru. hWen eouvy esnhfdii lal isht, etrurn to hte rchop of ePosmpy reehtat, eerhw loylu find us. reA secDui utBrus dan birTuones rhtee?

CINNA

All but Metellus Cimber, and hes gone
To seek you at your house. Well, I will hie,
And so bestow these papers as you bade me.

INCNA

Eorynvees ereth exectp utellesM beCrmi, dna esh oegn to kool ofr uoy at uyor ehuso. Wlle, lIl hyrru nda put etshe rapesp eewrh oyu ldto me.

CASSIUS

That done, repair to Pompeys theatre.

CAUSSSI

nheW uyeov diniehsf, go cbka to opesmPy tatrehe.
Exit CINNA
NNICA stxei.
155 Come, Casca, you and I will yet ere day
See Brutus at his house. Three parts of him
Is ours already, and the man entire
Upon the next encounter yields him ours.
eCmo on, aCcas, uoy dan I illw go ese tBsruu at his oeshu feoerb siuensr. eHs rthee-rreuqats on uor side alyreda, nda wlle nwi ihm vroe etyeilnr at htis tmgeine.

CASCA

Oh, he sits high in all the peoples hearts,
160 And that which would appear offense in us,
His countenance, like richest alchemy,
Will change to virtue and to worthiness.

AASCC

Oh, het elpeop loev mhi llwe. Tsihgn hatt odulw ookl dab if we did mteh, tusurB lduoc do and olko vrouuutisstj elik an scmahtiel unrst esorhwstl nti to glod.

CASSIUS

Him and his worth and our great need of him
You have right well conceited. Let us go,
165 For it is after midnight, and ere day
We will awake him and be sure of him.

SISUSCA

esY, oryue elosauytbl rtghi ubato how ryhtwo urBtsu is dan how cumh we ndee ihm. sLet go, bsecuea tis lraedya ferta mhidigtn, nda we ntaw him on rou seid ofereb tadhyigl.
Exeunt
hyTe txei.