Julius Caesar

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 2

page Act 3 Scene 2 Page 9

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FIRST PLEBEIAN

O piteous spectacle!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Oh, what a sad sight!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

    O noble Caesar!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Oh, noble Caesar!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

195O woeful day!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Oh, sad day!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

O traitors, villains!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Oh, traitors, villains!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

   O most bloody sight!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Oh, most bloody sight!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We will be revenged.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We will get revenge.

ALL

Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay!
Let not a traitor live!

ALL

Revenge! Let’s go after them! Seek! Burn! Set fire! Kill! Slay! Leave no traitors alive!

ANTONY

    Stay, countrymen.

ANTONY

Wait, countrymen.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

200Peace there! Hear the noble Antony.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Quiet there! Listen to the noble Antony.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We’ll hear him. We’ll follow him. We’ll die with him.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We’ll listen to him, we’ll follow him, we’ll die with him.

ANTONY

Good friends, sweet friends! Let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
They that have done this deed are honorable.
205What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
That made them do it. They are wise and honorable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts.
I am no orator, as Brutus is,
210But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man
That love my friend. And that they know full well
That gave me public leave to speak of him.
For I have neither wit nor words nor worth,
Action nor utterance nor the power of speech,
215To stir men’s blood. I only speak right on.
I tell you that which you yourselves do know,
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me. But were I Brutus,
And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
220Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue
In every wound of Caesar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

ANTONY

Good friends, sweet friends, don’t let me stir you up to such a sudden mutiny. Those who have done this deed are honorable. I don’t know what private grudges they had that made them do it. They’re wise and honorable, and will no doubt give you reasons for it. I haven’t come to steal your loyalty, friends. I’m no orator, as Brutus is. I’m only, as you know, a plain, blunt man who loved his friend, and the men who let me speak know this well. I have neither cleverness nor rhetorical skill nor the authority nor gesture nor eloquence nor the power of speech to stir men up. I just speak directly. I tell you what you already know. I show you sweet Caesar’s wounds—poor, speechless mouths!—and make them speak for me. But if I were Brutus and Brutus were me, then I’d stir you up, and install in each of Caesar’s wounds the kind of voice that could convince even stones to rise up and mutiny.