Julius Caesar

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

CASSIUS

    Hath Cassius lived
To be but mirth and laughter to his Brutus,
When grief and blood ill-tempered vexeth him?

CASSIUS

Have I lived this long only to be the butt of a joke whenever you’re angry or frustrated?

BRUTUS

120When I spoke that, I was ill-tempered too.

BRUTUS

When I said that, I was angry too.

CASSIUS

Do you confess so much? Give me your hand.

CASSIUS

You admit it, then? Give me your hand.

BRUTUS

And my heart too.

BRUTUS

And my heart too.
CASSIUS and BRUTUS shake hands
CASSIUS and BRUTUS shake hands.

CASSIUS

    O Brutus!

CASSIUS

Oh, Brutus!

BRUTUS

     What’s the matter?

BRUTUS

What’s the matter?

CASSIUS

Have not you love enough to bear with me,
When that rash humor which my mother gave me
125Makes me forgetful?

CASSIUS

Do you have enough love for me to be patient when my bad temper, which I inherited from my mother, makes me forget how I should behave?

BRUTUS

    Yes, Cassius. And from henceforth
When you are over-earnest with your Brutus,
He’ll think your mother chides and leave you so.

BRUTUS

Yes, Cassius. And from now on, when you get hot with me, I’ll assume it’s your mother speaking and leave it at that.

POET

(within) Let me go in to see the generals.
There is some grudge between 'em. 'Tis not meet
130They be alone.

POET

(offstage) Let me in to see the generals. There’s a grudge between them, and it isn’t a good idea for them to be alone.

LUCILLIUS

(within)    You shall not come to them.

LUCILLIUS

(offstage) You can’t see them.

POET

(within) Nothing but death shall stay me.

POET

(offstage) You’d have to kill me to stop me.
Enter a POET followed by LUCILLIUS and TITINIUS
A POET enters, followed by LUCILLIUS and TITINIUS.