Julius Caesar

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

And yesterday the bird of night did sit
Even at noon-day upon the marketplace,
Hooting and shrieking. When these prodigies
Do so conjointly meet, let not men say,
30“These are their reasons. They are natural.”
For I believe they are portentous things
Unto the climate that they point upon.
And yesterday the night owl sat hooting and shrieking in the marketplace at noon. When all these extraordinary things happen at once, we shouldn’t say, “These happenings can be explained rationally. They’re natural enough.” I think these things are omens of things to come in our country.

CICERO

Indeed, it is a strange-disposèd time.
But men may construe things after their fashion,
35Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.
Comes Caesar to the Capitol tomorrow?

CICERO

Indeed, it’s a strange time. But men tend to interpret things however suits them and totally miss the actual meaning of the things themselves. Is Caesar visiting the Capitol tomorrow?

CASCA

He doth, for he did bid Antonius
Send word to you he would be there tomorrow.

CASCA

He is, because he told Antonius to tell you he’d be there tomorrow.

CICERO

Good night then, Casca. This disturbèd sky
40Is not to walk in.

CICERO

Good night then, Casca. This bad weather isn’t good to walk around in.

CASCA

Farewell, Cicero.

CASCA

Farewell, Cicero
Exit CICERO
CICERO exits.
Enter CASSIUS
CASSIUS enters.

CASSIUS

Who’s there?

CASSIUS

Who’s there?

CASCA

   A Roman.

CASCA

A Roman.

CASSIUS

    Casca, by your voice.

CASSIUS

It’s Casca—I know your voice.

CASCA

Your ear is good. Cassius, what night is this!

CASCA

Your ear is good. Cassius, what a night this is!

CASSIUS

A very pleasing night to honest men.

CASSIUS

It’s a very pleasing night to honest men.

CASCA

45Who ever knew the heavens menace so?

CASCA

Who ever saw the heavens threaten like this?