Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 1 Scene 3
No Fear Act 1 Scene 3 Page 5

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CASSIUS

And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
105Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep.
He were no lion were not Romans hinds.
Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
Begin it with weak straws. What trash is Rome,
110What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
For the base matter to illuminate
So vile a thing as Caesar! But, O grief,
Where hast thou led me? I perhaps speak this
Before a willing bondman. Then I know
115My answer must be made. But I am armed,
And dangers are to me indifferent.

CASSIUS

How can Caesar be a tyrant then? Poor man! I know he wouldn’t be a wolf if the Romans didn’t act like sheep. He couldn’t be a lion if the Romans weren’t such easy prey. People who want to start a big fire quickly start with little twigs. Rome becomes complete trash, nothing but rubbish and garbage, when it works to light up the ambitions of someone as worthless as Caesar. But, oh no! What have I said in my grief? I might be speaking to someone who wants to be a slave, in which case I’ll be held accountable for my words. But I’m armed and I don’t care about danger.

CASCA

You speak to Casca, and to such a man
That is no fleering telltale. Hold, my hand.
Be factious for redress of all these griefs,
120And I will set this foot of mine as far
As who goes farthest.

CASCA

You’re talking to Casca, not to some smiling, two-faced tattletale. Say no more. Shake my hand. If you’re joining together to right these wrongs, I’ll go as far as any one of you.

CASSIUS

    There’s a bargain made.
Now know you, Casca, I have moved already
Some certain of the noblest-minded Romans
To undergo with me an enterprise
125Of honorable-dangerous consequence.
And I do know by this they stay for me
In Pompey’s porch. For now, this fearful night,
There is no stir or walking in the streets,
And the complexion of the element
130In favor’s like the work we have in hand,
Most bloody, fiery, and most terrible.

CASSIUS

That’s a deal. Now let me tell you, Casca, I have already convinced some of the noblest Romans to join me in an honorable but dangerous mission. And I know that by now they’re waiting for me on the porch outside Pompey’s theater. We’re meeting on this fearful night because no one is out on the streets. The sky tonight looks bloody, fiery, and terrible, just like the work we have to do.
Enter CINNA
CINNA enters.